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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Rhys Stevens and Maureen Beristain

The rapid expansion of the Canadian gambling industry since 1969 has generated substantial profits for provincial governments and industry operators. As gambling expands…

Abstract

The rapid expansion of the Canadian gambling industry since 1969 has generated substantial profits for provincial governments and industry operators. As gambling expands its reach and regulatory structures evolve, a growing body of researchers is starting to scrutinize the industry and its socio‐economic impacts on Canadians. This article provides background information on Canada's gambling industry and presents an overview of essential information resources.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Choong‐Ki Lee and Ki‐Joon Back

The purpose of this paper is to overview empirical research on gambling impacts, theories employed to these gambling impact studies and methodology of gambling impacts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to overview empirical research on gambling impacts, theories employed to these gambling impact studies and methodology of gambling impacts.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive review of literature on several gaming and tourism journals is presented.

Findings

The paper summarizes theories associated with gaming research, gaming impact variables and methodological perspectives in gaming research.

Practical implications

The overview of residents' perception provides policy makers to take appropriate actions, minimizing negative impact and maximizing positive impact of gaming industry.

Originality/value

The paper is the most comprehensive review of both theories and methodologies of journal articles dealing with residents' perception toward gambling development from early 1980s through 2009.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

Moira Conway

Throughout the United States, an increasing number of states have turned to legalizing gambling and constructing casinos as a source of economic development. In 2004…

Abstract

Throughout the United States, an increasing number of states have turned to legalizing gambling and constructing casinos as a source of economic development. In 2004, casino gambling was legalized in Pennsylvania. The state plans to open 14 slot machine casinos, and 2 of them would be located in the city of Philadelphia. Much debate occurred regarding the location of these casinos in Philadelphia; currently one casino is open and construction has yet to begin on the other. However, casinos have been proven to cause many potential problems for the area where they are located, such as pollution, crime, and traffic. Because of these problems, it is believed that casinos are often located in neighborhoods dominated by people who traditionally lack political power. This project seeks to analyze the public policy actions that have resulted in the two current casino locations in Philadelphia, and examine the socioeconomic characteristics of the areas surrounding the casinos using environmental justice GIS methods.

Details

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Jon Mills

Since the end of the Second World War, American society has seen the emergence of technology promising to make life easier, better and longer lasting. The more recent…

Abstract

Since the end of the Second World War, American society has seen the emergence of technology promising to make life easier, better and longer lasting. The more recent explosion of the Internet is fulfilling the dreams of the high‐tech pundits as it provides global real‐time communication links and makes the world's knowledge universally available. Privacy concerns surrounding the development of the Internet have mounted, and in response, service providers and website operators have enabled Web users to conduct transactions in nearly complete anonymity. While anonymity respects individual privacy, it also facilitates criminal activities needing secrecy. One such activity is money laundering, which is now being facilitated by the emerging Internet casinos industry. These casinos can be physically located anywhere with websites available worldwide. Internet casinos were a target of legislation by the US Congress, but the legislation, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act, failed to pass. So, at the moment, Internet casinos are a virtually unregulated mechanism for laundering illegal funds.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Alan D. Smith

Technology that directly leverages the internet is rapidly changing how people interact with one another, especially in the entertainment industry. Industries that were…

Abstract

Technology that directly leverages the internet is rapidly changing how people interact with one another, especially in the entertainment industry. Industries that were once considered amoral and illegal are adapting to new business models and transforming how business transactions are conducted and financial profits are generated. This is certainly the case with e‐gambling, in particular with regard to the proliferation of e‐casinos. Strategically important questions must be answered concerning how governmental agencies and new industries developed around the internet should be regulated, particularly issues associated with online gambling. Is online gambling the major addictive channel of all forms of gambling, and should the government do something to stop it? Should governments treat e‐casinos similarly to regular casinos and gaming activities and tax the industry to aid society? The internationality of the internet makes it very difficult to find solutions based only on local and national solutions. The future of cybergambling may be dependent on the diffusion of innovations, and whether they can deliver customer value in an ethical and legitimate manner.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Jordan Hillman and Walter E. Block

In the present epoch, when the witch hunt for victimless criminals continues apace and even increases, it is all the more important to protect our liberties. One of the…

Abstract

Purpose

In the present epoch, when the witch hunt for victimless criminals continues apace and even increases, it is all the more important to protect our liberties. One of the purposes of the present paper is to do so with regard to gambling.

Design/methodology/approach

We use logical arguments (reductios ad absurdum) and empirical case studies to make the case that online or any other kind of gambling in general, and poker in particular, are justified uses of our freedoms.

Findings

We find that although poker, whether online or in any other format is under attack by the powers that be, the case for such initiatives is a weak one.

Originality/value

The value of this essay is to focus attention on yet another one of our liberties that is in grave danger of being obliterated.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Chimezie Ozurumba

Corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2006. As a result, the annual…

Abstract

Corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2006. As a result, the annual gambling revenue realized by the casino industry has grown from $9 billion in 1991 to over $32 billion in 2006. The growth of gambling in many states has not been matched by a corresponding increase in academic research on casino gambling. To shed more light on casino gambling and state budgets, this research examines state education spending following the introduction of corporate casino gambling and attempts to answer the following question: Does gambling revenue earmarked for education spending displace funds usually spent on these programs?

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Chimezie Ozurumba and Younhee Kim

In the past two decades, corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2007. As…

Abstract

In the past two decades, corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2007. As a result, the annual gambling revenue realized by the casino industry has grown from $9 billion in 1991 to more than $34 billion in 2007. The growth of gambling revenue as a source of additional state tax revenue, however, has not been matched by a corresponding increase of academic research on casino gambling. The research addresses the question of whether states are maximizing collected corporate casino tax revenue and finds that states fall into one of four clusters: undertaxing; overtaxing; undertaxing but close to the revenuemaximization tax level; and overtaxing but close to the revenue-maximization tax level.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Chien-Yi Yang, Ming-Huey Li and Shih-Shuo Yeh

Using the modified theory of planned behavior, this study aims to understand residents’ supporting or rejecting mindsets toward legalizing gambling in Kinmen, Taiwan…

Abstract

Using the modified theory of planned behavior, this study aims to understand residents’ supporting or rejecting mindsets toward legalizing gambling in Kinmen, Taiwan, where exists a complex and somewhat contradictory relationships between economic growth and the preservation of the natural environment in the context of tourism specifically to small island destinations. This study develops a convenience sampling procedure in which 365 questionnaires are collected. A series of hypotheses tests are conducted via structural equation modeling. This study notices that perceived behavioral control is the most important attribute affecting behavioral intention. However, behavioral intention does not necessarily lead to actual behavior. Attitude is considered as a more reliable predictor of actual action. Attitude relied heavily on positive perceived behavioral control. Further, the respondents are concerned more about how legalizing gambling affects their current lifestyle.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-956-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

William N. Thompson, Carl Lutrin, R. Fred Wacker and Elizabeth Vercher

Elazar’s typology of political cultures is examined. From his categorization of jurisdictions with aspects of 'moralistic' political cultures, five are selected…

Abstract

Elazar’s typology of political cultures is examined. From his categorization of jurisdictions with aspects of 'moralistic' political cultures, five are selected: Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Connecticut, and France. Their recent political history is examined and it is demonstrated that these 'moralistic' type polities have abandoned policies which formerly condemned or at least contained legalized gambling. Instead each has responded to commercial pressures for expanded gambling. The reasons why ‘moralistic’ values in making decisions in this arena have been cast aside are examined. The reasons include an international cross-polity homogenization of political cultures, a blurring of the meaning of ‘moralistic’ in today’s politics, and above all, severe economic crises that take precedence over other values.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

1 – 10 of 350