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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Lizhao Zhang, Xu Du, Jui-Long Hung and Hao Li

The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review to understand state-of-art research related to learning preferences from the aspects of impacts, influential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review to understand state-of-art research related to learning preferences from the aspects of impacts, influential factors and evaluation methods.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the systematic synthesis method to provide state-of-the-art knowledge on learning preference research by summarizing published studies in major databases and attempting to aggregate and reconcile the scientific results from the individual studies. The findings summarize aggregated research efforts and improve the quality of future research.

Findings

After analyzing existing literature, this study proposed three possible research directions in the future. First, researchers might focus on how to use the real-time tracking mechanism to further understand other impacts of learning preferences within the learning environments. Second, existing studies mainly focused on the influence of singular factors on learning preferences. The joint effects of multiple factors should be an important topic for future research. Finally, integrated algorithms might become the most popular evaluation method of learning preference in the era of smart learning environments.

Research limitations/implications

This review used the search results generated by Google Scholar and Web of Science databases. There might be published papers available in other databases that have not been taken into account.

Originality/value

The research summarizes the state-of-art research related to learning preferences. This paper is one of the first to discuss the development of learning preference research in smart learning environments.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Enrico Bracci, Mouhcine Tallaki and Monia Castellini

In accounting education studies, there is increasing interest in using teaching visual tools and contents. However, research about the pedagogical benefits of visual in…

Abstract

Purpose

In accounting education studies, there is increasing interest in using teaching visual tools and contents. However, research about the pedagogical benefits of visual in education is still limited. This paper aims to contribute to the debate by providing evidence on the extent to which the visual represents a relevant learning preference of accounting students.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted the visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic questionnaire as a tested means to study the learning preferences of accounting students. The empirical study is based on a survey conducted with undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students.

Findings

The results show that visualization appears to be the less-relevant learning preference of students. This result is not in line with the emergent discussion in accounting education literature, which examines how visual tools can improve the presentation of accounting information. This opens the debate about the potential use of visual tools in teaching accounting. Besides, gender and origin of students (national vs international) appeared as relevant factors in explaining a greater visual learning preference.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to contribute to the accounting literature by providing evidence on the extent to which the visual represents the relevant learning preferences of accounting students. In addition, given that most of the literature on students’ learning preferences are based on Anglo-Saxon contexts, the authors provide evidence from a Latin country.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2021

Gregoris Demetriou, George Papageorgiou and Andreas Efstathiades

The purpose of this research is the modeling of the relationship of Learning Style and Learning Source Preferences to Organizational Learning Capability (OLC).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is the modeling of the relationship of Learning Style and Learning Source Preferences to Organizational Learning Capability (OLC).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire gave us data from 274 employees in the hotel industry in Cyprus, which was chosen because it is a labor-intensive industry with big economic impact on the National Domestic Product (as per Cyprus Investment Promotion Agency this is more than 20%). SPSS and AMOS were used to analyse the proposed model.

Findings

The findings provided evidence to support the position that the proposed model demonstrates that OLC is affected by the Individual Learning Preferences (ILP) which are the learning style preference and the learning source preference of individual workers.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not consider the effect of learning style and learning source preferences on the different departments of a hotel. Further, a longitudinal study with more organizations within the hotel sector, or other economic sectors, was outside the scope of this study.

Practical implications

The proposed model can be used by organizations to reflect on how learning source and learning style preferences can affect the OLC.

Originality/value

What relevant research did not explore enough, is the learning preferences of individuals in their work environment and not as often seen, the learning styles or learning (dis)abilities of students in a school environment. Therefore, this research fulfills the need to study learning preferences in the business context and examines their effects on OLC.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2014

Susan A. Lynn

Student populations in higher education in the United States have become increasingly diverse as a result of demographic changes. As a result, educators need an…

Abstract

Student populations in higher education in the United States have become increasingly diverse as a result of demographic changes. As a result, educators need an understanding of the background and characteristics of these demographic subgroups in order to improve the quality of their education. Students’ approaches to learning affect their quality of learning and are influenced by their perceptions of the learning environment and assessment. The present study extends prior research by examining the approaches to learning, assessment preferences, and the relationship between approaches to learning and assessment preferences of intermediate accounting students enrolled in a public university in the United States with a diverse student population. Students with higher deep approaches to learning had higher preferences for assessment involving higher-order thinking tasks, integrated assessment, and nonconventional assessment. Students with higher surface approaches to learning had lower preferences for assessment involving higher-order thinking tasks. The differences in these relationships for subgroups of students defined by citizenship, age, gender, and race are presented. The implications of the results for teaching and learning in accounting education are discussed.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-840-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Darwish Abdulrahman Yousef

The purpose of this paper is to address the use of Honey and Mumford’s Learning Styles Questionnaire (LSQ) to investigate the learning style preferences of undergraduate…

1602

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the use of Honey and Mumford’s Learning Styles Questionnaire (LSQ) to investigate the learning style preferences of undergraduate students at the American University of Ras Al Khaimah (AURAK) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) culture. It also investigates whether there are significant differences across the four dimensions of learning styles due to students’ demographics.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed to a sample of 200 undergraduate students at AURAK in the UAE. The majority of students were Arabic native-speakers. Descriptive statistics were used to present the main characteristics of respondents and the results of the study. The independent samples t-test, Mann–Whitney test and Kurskal–Wallis test were used to find out if there are significant differences across the four dimensions of learning styles due to students’ demographics.

Findings

The results of the study illustrated that undergraduate students at AURAK have preferences for the reflector (15.0), pragmatist (14.2), theorist (13.9) and activist (12.3) learning styles. Moreover, there are only significant differences between Emirati and non-Emirati students across the four learning styles and between single and married students in the theorist learning style.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a number of limitations. First, the findings of the study are based on the data collected from only one university. Second, the sample is limited to undergraduate students and, therefore, it excludes graduate students who might have different experiences. Third, the results are based on a self-reported questionnaire which might affect the reliability of the results. On the other hand, it has a number of implications for educators and students. Educators will benefit from the results of this study in the sense that they need to adopt teaching styles and strategies that match the learning styles of the majority of their students. Students themselves will benefit from knowing their own learning style.

Originality/value

The present study validates a learning style theory developed in a western culture in an Arabic culture.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

M.L. van Oordt, T. van Oordt and P. du Toit

This paper aims to focus on the thinking styles of a group of Accounting students, and to determine whether team teaching by two criteria-specific lecturers can be an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the thinking styles of a group of Accounting students, and to determine whether team teaching by two criteria-specific lecturers can be an effective collaborative teaching approach to accommodate students’ diverse learning preferences. Research on thinking and learning processes led to a four-quadrant whole-brain model of people’s thinking styles and associated learning preferences. The model can be used to identify and accommodate students’ diverse thinking styles and learning preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was followed, using multiple data collection methods. The thinking styles of 288 students and two lecturers were surveyed using a thinking style questionnaire and the Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument. The results of the collaborative teaching approach were obtained by way of a survey questionnaire providing both quantitative and qualitative feedback, as well as a SWOT analysis completed by the involved lecturers.

Findings

The main results suggest that a collaborative teaching approach can address students’ diverse learning preferences, although some students may find constant switching between lecturers distracting.

Research limitations/implications

The collaborative teaching approach in the teaching interaction cannot be isolated. Collaborative teaching was not repeated or extended due to resource constraints.

Originality/value

Academics from all disciplines recognise a need for a teaching practice that addresses students’ diverse learning preferences. Hitherto, outside of special education, collaborative teaching has received little scholarly attention, especially as an approach to address tertiary students’ diverse learning preferences.

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Darwish Abdulrahamn Yousef

This study aims to incorporate the Honey and Mumford’s learning styles questionnaire (LSQ) to assess the learning style preferences of postgraduate students at the British…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to incorporate the Honey and Mumford’s learning styles questionnaire (LSQ) to assess the learning style preferences of postgraduate students at the British University in Dubai (BUiD), as well as investigating whether there are statistically significant differences in such preferences from demographic and academic characteristics perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed to a sample of 200 students (males and females) in various postgraduate programs. Descriptive statistics analysis presented the main characteristics of the respondents and the results of the study. The independent samples t-test and Kurskal–Wallis test determined if there are significant differences in learning style preferences among the postgraduate students because of their demographic and academic characteristics.

Findings

The results revealed that postgraduate students preferred the theorist (20.36), reflector (20.31), pragmatist (19.00) and activist (18.62) learning styles, while no significant statistical differences were found across the four learning styles from demographic and academic characteristics standpoint.

Research/limitations implications

On one hand, the present study has several limitations. First, the findings of the study are based on data from only single university. Second, the sample is limited to postgraduate students. Third, the results are based on a self-reported questionnaire, which might affect their reliability. On the other hand, this study has some implications for educators and students. Its results could help educator adopt appropriate teaching styles and strategies that match the preferred learning styles of the majority of their students. Students themselves could also benefit from knowing their own learning style.

Originality/value

The present study is the first scholarly attempt to explore learning style preferences of postgraduate students in the UAE higher education context.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Darwish Abdulrahman Yousef

The purpose of this study is to examine the use of Honey and Mumford’s (1986) learning styles questionnaire (LSQ) in the context of United Arab Emirates (UAE) higher…

1215

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the use of Honey and Mumford’s (1986) learning styles questionnaire (LSQ) in the context of United Arab Emirates (UAE) higher education. In particular, it aims at exploring the learning style preferences of United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) students using LSQ. It also investigates whether there are statistically significant differences in students’ learning style preferences because of their demographic and academic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 1,463 undergraduate students at the UAEU. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present the main characteristics of respondents, to explore the learning style preferences of UAEU students and to find out whether there are significant differences in students’ learning style preferences because of their demographic and academic characteristics.

Findings

Results indicated that UAEU students have strong preferences for the four learning styles. Results showed that about 68 per cent of UAEU students have strong or very strong preferences for the activist leaning style, whereas about 84 per cent have strong or very strong preferences for the reflector learning style, 78 per cent have strong or very strong preferences for the theorist learning style; about 60 per cent have strong or very strong preferences for the pragmatist learning style. Furthermore, there were statistically significant differences in certain learning styles because of students’ demographic and academic characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of limitations associated with this study. First, data were collected from a single university in the UAE. Second, the results are based on a self-report survey and this in turn might affect the reliability of the results. Another limitation is that this study is of snapshot type. Hence, it might not capture the dynamic nature of learning style. On the other hand, it has a number of implications for students, educators and administrators.

Originality/value

The present study is the first attempt to explore learning styles preference of undergraduate students using LSQ, not only in the content of UAE higher education but also in the Arab world.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Kim Buch and Susan Bartley

An exploratory study investigated the relationship between learning style and preference for training delivery mode. It was expected that learning style would influence…

15415

Abstract

An exploratory study investigated the relationship between learning style and preference for training delivery mode. It was expected that learning style would influence learners’ preference for receiving training through classroom‐, computer‐, TV‐, print‐, or audio‐based delivery modes. A total of 165 employees from a large US financial institution completed the Kolb Learning Style Instrument and a survey measuring training delivery mode preference. Results found support for the expected relationship between the two, with convergers showing a stronger preference for computer‐based delivery and assimilators showing a stronger preference for print‐based delivery. However, results also revealed an overall preference for classroom‐based delivery for adults in the study, regardless of their learning style. Implications of these results for training design and delivery are discussed.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Eugene Sadler‐Smith

The study is an attempt to provide empirical elaboration, in the context of business and management education, for the “onion” and cognitive control models of cognitive…

2916

Abstract

The study is an attempt to provide empirical elaboration, in the context of business and management education, for the “onion” and cognitive control models of cognitive style. Using a sample of 226 business and management undergraduates the research explored the relationship between cognitive style (measured using the cognitive style index and learning preference. Using principal components analysis, three categories of learning preference were discerned (active, reflective and individual). Correlational analysis and one way analysis of variance revealed statistically significant relationships between preferences for reflective and individual methods and cognitive style. The results provide some support for the “onion” and cognitive control models; the implications for business and management education, training and development are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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