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Abstract

Details

Technology-enhanced Learning and Linguistic Diversity: Strategies and Approaches to Teaching Students in a 2nd or 3rd Language
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-128-8

Book part
Publication date: 2 January 2013

Beatriz A. Duarte, Barbara Greybeck and Cynthia G. Simpson

The evaluation of minority children for special education by law should be nondiscriminatory. To be in compliance with federal mandates such as the Individuals with…

Abstract

The evaluation of minority children for special education by law should be nondiscriminatory. To be in compliance with federal mandates such as the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA), No Child Left Behind (NCLB), and Public Law 94-142, minority children who are also English language learners (ELLs) should be assessed in their native language or other appropriate mode of communication. During assessment, the child's language skills in terms of both Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) and Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) should be considered. Assessments like the Woodcock-Munoz and Student Oral Language Observation Matrix (SOLOM) can be used to determine the child's dominant language and proficiency in both their first (L1) and second (L2) languages. Models such as that proposed by Olvera and Gomez-Cerrillo (2011) which includes procedures for formal and informal assessments, as well as data collection and observation, can help guide a school psychologist or diagnostician when assessing a bilingual child. One main goal of this type of evaluation is to distinguish academic delays caused by a learning disability from those caused by a lack of proficiency in English. Cautions with respect to the testing of ELLs are highlighted.

Details

Learning Disabilities: Identification, Assessment, and Instruction of Students with LD
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-426-8

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2022

William T. Holmes

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to engage the field of leaders, practitioners, organizational trainers, and scholars into the idea that leader talk and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to engage the field of leaders, practitioners, organizational trainers, and scholars into the idea that leader talk and the implementation of Motivating Language Theory takes ability. It takes thought and intentionality. It goes beyond just the use of the three leadership languages known as the Motivating Language Constructs that are so often written about in Motivating Language Theory research as “Motivating Language” when indeed they are not.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual approach behind this quick primer is to take previous research in Motivating Language Theory and refine and expand the work centered around Motivating Language Ability in order to bring greater attention and focus to Motivating Language and the necessary skills leaders need to bring it about.

Findings

The findings of this conceptual paper explicitly highlight levels of leader talk and Motivating Language usage and provides ideas and strategies for the implementation of Motivating Language Ability.

Research limitations/implications

The research implication of this conceptual paper is to assist scholars in clarifying their use of Motivating Language in research as there are times when researchers will identify Motivating Language in their research but not have Motivating Language as a significant variable.

Practical implications

The practical implication of this conceptual paper is to provide guidance and information to practitioners in the field on content that is critical for leader and organizational development.

Originality/value

The value of this conceptual paper is that it builds off of research already published and adds additional clarification and emphasis to an understudied and discussed element of Motivating Language Theory and leader talk in general.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2022

Steven Bird and Gary F. Simons

This paper reports on the first 20 years of the Open Language Archives Community (OLAC), comprehensive infrastructure for indexing and discovering language resources.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports on the first 20 years of the Open Language Archives Community (OLAC), comprehensive infrastructure for indexing and discovering language resources.

Design/methodology/approach

We begin with the original vision, assess progress relative to the original requirements, and identify ongoing challenges.

Findings

Based on the overview of OLAC history and recent developments and on the analysis of the situation in the language archives area as a whole, the authors propose an agenda for a more sustainable future for open language archiving.

Originality/value

This paper examines the progress of OLAC and discusses improvements in such areas as participation, access, and sustainability.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2022

Muneera Muftah

Web-based language learning (WBLL) materials have long been favored by English language instructors because they are plentiful, easily accessible, user-friendly and, most…

Abstract

Purpose

Web-based language learning (WBLL) materials have long been favored by English language instructors because they are plentiful, easily accessible, user-friendly and, most importantly, free. This research looks into the effects of learning the simple perfect tense translation in three different English translation classes that used three different teaching methods: traditional face-to-face, integrative and web-based learning. It also aims to investigate the impact of gender on every mode of instruction and to identify the most effective method for learning translation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is quantitative, with a pretest/posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 93 third-year undergraduate students (51 female and 42 male students) participated in the pretest/posttest design. Each group was exposed to one mode of instruction for nine weeks. All groups sat for a pretest in the first week of the treatment. After the treatment, the participants were provided with a posttest, and the data obtained were analyzed using the SPSS computer software program.

Findings

The findings revealed a significant difference in both tests for all modes used. All three groups improved in their gain score, but the highest gain among these groups was the integrative method, followed by web-based learning. The result of the independent sample t-tests and ANOVA exhibited that there was no significant difference in the level of students between the two groups, both were sig. two-tailed (p = 0.342). Furthermore, it was discovered that gender did not affect students' performance in the posttest (Z = −1.564, p > 0.05) when each mode of instruction was applied. Finally, the integrative method was observed to be the most effective.

Practical implications

The findings can inspire translation course designers to plan necessary policies or syllabi regarding English translation courses and may serve as a platform for improving the curriculum for training and motivating the next generation of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners.

Originality/value

The findings of this study could be used to improve English instruction in countries where English is a second or foreign language. The actual gap in knowledge is that no other studies have compared all three groups in the past few years.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2022

Xu Ning and Jeannet Stephen

This research explores the standard language ideology in Chinese foreign language education policies. The most substantial in relation to language policy and management in…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the standard language ideology in Chinese foreign language education policies. The most substantial in relation to language policy and management in regard to language ideology are beliefs associated with the values on the named language and its varieties (Spolsky, 2009). In the standard language ideology, the standard is treated as being valuable linguistic capital and possessing prestige as well as authority. Mandarin is the most well-accepted standard Chinese, and similarly, UK English or US English is the most popular and Standard English (SE) in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework in this research is critical discourse analysis (CDA) and discourse-historical approach (DHA) to guide the data collection and data analysis. This research will review recent and seminal literature obtained from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) on language policy in China in relation to standard language ideology. The literature also investigates Chinese state's English language ideologies using official language education policies (FLEPs).

Findings

The results show that standard language ideology is a common mindset found within official state policies in regard to SE. The authors argue that the Chinese trust on the ideology of standard language appears to not be aligned to recent worldwide trends such as globalization and multilingualism.

Originality/value

This research can provide insights into future language planning and language policy in China and shows that the future research could do more on language planning in China.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2022

Mustafa Elkasih Abdulkarim, Mohamed Ismail Umlai and Layth Faris Al-Saudi

This study aims to explore the role that culture and language play in the implementation of International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role that culture and language play in the implementation of International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS).

Design/methodology/approach

The Hofstede–Gray and Huerta et al. (2013) models were used to collect data on language and accounting culture. Paired-sample t-test, regression and factor analyses were conducted on data from a sample of 101 respondents. This study also used ordinary least squares to test hypotheses.

Findings

The cultural dimensions of professionalism, secrecy and uniformity significantly influence the implementation of IPSAS. Furthermore, this study finds a significant link between culture, language and IPSAS implementation, which underlines the need for careful consideration of International Public Sector Accounting Standards Board policies in the promotion of IPSAS internationally.

Research limitations/implications

While this study is limited to its research method, using secondary data would have been challenging given the setting and accessibility issues. This study overcomes this problem by using a self-administered questionnaire. Prior studies confirm the reliability of the constructs. Despite providing justifications for why the authors use judgemental sampling, the authors acknowledge the limitation of the technique in survey distribution. Furthermore, the findings cannot be read without caution, as the authors focused on one country. However, interactions between accounting practices and culture in one country may be transferred to other countries that share a common language and culture with Qatar. The authors believe future research in this area will complement the understanding of the determinants of IPSAS implementation should the study be replicated.

Social implications

Policymakers, standard setters and regulators should promote and enforce an integrated approach that reflects the need for accountants and auditors to be conscious of the effects of culture and language, given the likelihood of widespread IPSAS adoption.

Originality/value

This study offers insight into the significance of culture and language in reforming public-sector accounting systems in developing nations and emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2022

Fauzia Syed, Saima Naseer, Fatima Bashir and Tasneem Fatima

Recent evidence suggests that leaders' communication is central to an organization's success. The purpose of the current research is to examine how the leader's motivating…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent evidence suggests that leaders' communication is central to an organization's success. The purpose of the current research is to examine how the leader's motivating language (direction giving, empathetic and meaning-making) translates into positive career outcomes through the mechanism of positive affective tone.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-wave time-lagged research design was applied to collect data (N = 320) from employees of the telecom sector of Pakistan.

Findings

Employing structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis, the study results indicate that high levels of leader's motivating language (direction giving and meaning-making) result in positive affective tone in employees, which further creates career motivation (career insight, career resilience and career identity) and career satisfaction. In contrast, positive affective tone does not mediate between empathetic language and career motivation (career insight, career resilience and career identity) and career satisfaction relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The present study's findings explicate the unique effects and mechanism through which leaders motivating language becomes influential in reaping its benefits for followers' career outcomes. More research is warranted to examine other attitudinal and behavioral outcomes of leaders motivating language. This study research prepares future researchers to investigate other mediators and moderators in the leaders motivating language–career outcomes relationship. The authors recommend further implications of the study's findings for research and practice in the domain of leadership, affect and careers.

Originality/value

The current study opens up a new perspective in leaders motivating language literature by examining the underlying mechanism of positive affective tone.

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Dirk Lewandowski

This paper's aim is to test the ability of the major search engines Google, Yahoo, MSN and Ask to distinguish between German‐ and English‐language documents.

1085

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to test the ability of the major search engines Google, Yahoo, MSN and Ask to distinguish between German‐ and English‐language documents.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 50 queries using words common in both German and English were submitted to the search engines. The advanced search option of language restriction was used, once in German and once in English, and the first 20 results per engine in each language were investigated.

Findings

While none of the search engines faced problems providing results in the language of the interface that was used, both Google and MSN faced difficulties when the results were restricted to a foreign language.

Research limitations/implications

Search engines were only tested in German and English. There is only anecdotal evidence that the problems are the same with other languages.

Practical implications

Searchers should not use the language restriction in Google and MSN when searching for foreign‐language documents. Instead, searchers should use Yahoo or Ask. If searching for foreign language documents in Google or MSN, the interface in the target language or country should be used.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates a problem with search engines that has not been previously investigated.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Ghazi Ghaith and Hassan Diab

The purpose of this paper is to determine the degree of interrelatedness and the role of a number of context‐specific factors in the English language proficiency…

663

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the degree of interrelatedness and the role of a number of context‐specific factors in the English language proficiency development of Arab college‐bound learners. These factors include: language class risk‐taking, sociability, discomfort, motivation, and attitude toward class.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a one‐group pretest‐posttest experimental design. In total, 67 (n=67) male English as a foreign language college‐bound learners participated in the study. All participants took general English language proficiency pretests and posttests in order to determine the effect size of improvement in their language proficiency after an intensive treatment of 200 contact hours. The calculated effect sizes of improvement were correlated with learners' scores on the factors under study as measured by a modified version of the Ely classroom climate measure. In addition, Pearson product‐moment correlation coefficients were computed and a step‐wise multiple regression analysis was run in order to determine the degree of interrelatedness among the variables under study and to determine their extent of their role in the effect size of the proficiency gains of the participants.

Findings

The findings indicated that language class sociability is positively related to students' motivation to learn and to a positive class attitude. Conversely, language class risk‐taking was found to be negatively related to class discomfort which in turn was negatively related to student motivation to learn. The findings also indicated that none of the affective variables under study predicted the effect size of the proficiency gains realized by learners.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study suggest that language acquisition is a complex process determined by interaction among a number of learner‐related and contextual factors. Furthermore, the findings suggest that motivation for learning is related to learners' affective feelings and may impact their class participation. A limitation of the study is that it employed a one‐group experimental design and, as such, there was no control or comparison group.

Practical implications

Using humanistic/affective methods of teaching could decrease students' feelings of class discomfort and increase their motivation and class sociability.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into the language acquisition process of Arab college‐bound learners based on empirical evidence.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

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