Search results

1 – 10 of over 26000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

John Ozment and Douglas N. Chard

Before distribution managers can effectively manage customer service, they must be able to determine how sales respond to various levels of service. The potential for…

Abstract

Before distribution managers can effectively manage customer service, they must be able to determine how sales respond to various levels of service. The potential for customer service to contribute to a company's sales is generally acknowledged and has received considerable attention in the literature over the past several years. Much of the work, however, has been of a theoretical nature. Empirical studies have been confined largely to analyses of data collected by surveys which measure respondents' opinions regarding varying levels of logistics service. Hence, conclusions are based on sales expectations or purchase intentions of sellers and buyers, respectively. It is not suggested that respondents would misrepresent their concern for service levels, but little work has been done to confirm the proposed sales‐service relationships through analysis of historical data. If expectations and/or intentions indeed become actions, the impact should be observable in sales patterns over time.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Rachel S. Rauvola, Cort W. Rudolph and Hannes Zacher

In this chapter, the authors consider the role of time for research in occupational stress and well-being. First, temporal issues in studying occupational health…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors consider the role of time for research in occupational stress and well-being. First, temporal issues in studying occupational health longitudinally, focusing in particular on the role of time lags and their implications for observed results (e.g., effect detectability), analyses (e.g., handling unequal durations between measurement occasions), and interpretation (e.g., result generalizability, theoretical revision) were discussed. Then, time-based assumptions when modeling lagged effects in occupational health research, providing a focused review of how research has handled (or ignored) these assumptions in the past, and the relative benefits and drawbacks of these approaches were discussed. Finally, recommendations for readers, an accessible tutorial (including example data and code), and discussion of a new structural equation modeling technique, continuous time structural equation modeling, that can “handle” time in longitudinal studies of occupational health were provided.

Details

Examining and Exploring the Shifting Nature of Occupational Stress and Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-422-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

John Saunders

The adoption of a model‐building approach to marketing is today inevitable, due to improvements in hardware and software and the increased professionalisation of marketing…

Abstract

The adoption of a model‐building approach to marketing is today inevitable, due to improvements in hardware and software and the increased professionalisation of marketing and its techniques. Aggregate response models are focused upon, particularly the issues of which responses are realistic and should be modelled, how the response can be expressed and how a choice can be made between options available. The traditional model‐building process is described, and the inclusion of correct variables found to be critical, the primary means of doing this being statistical analysis. Simple expressions perform as effectively as more complex ones, and should be used if able to give operationally meaningful results. Cross‐correlation analysis and biased estimation techniques provide good guides to usable variables and their effects.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Da Liu, Wenbo Wang and Yinchuan Zhao

Weather affects consumer decision-making. However, academic research on how weather factors affect specific takeaway foods is limited. This paper aims to fill in the gap…

Abstract

Purpose

Weather affects consumer decision-making. However, academic research on how weather factors affect specific takeaway foods is limited. This paper aims to fill in the gap and therefore to contribute to online marketing and operation.

Design/methodology/approach

Web crawler techniques were first exploited to collect takeaway food ordering data from Meituan, the world’s largest GMV platform. Then statistics models and a time series regression model were selected to study the weather impact on online orders.

Findings

The findings highlight that certain weather factors, such as temperature, air quality and rainfall have clear effects on most category takeaway orders.

Originality/value

Quantitative analysis of weather impacts on the takeaway ordering business will help to guide the online service platforms for marketing promotion and the settled businesses to make reasonable arrangements for inventory and marketing tactics.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 February 2008

Terra McKinnish

This chapter demonstrates that fixed-effects and first-differences models often understate the effect of interest because of the variation used to identify the model. In…

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates that fixed-effects and first-differences models often understate the effect of interest because of the variation used to identify the model. In particular, the within-unit time-series variation often reflects transitory fluctuations that have little effect on behavioral outcomes. The data in effect suffer from measurement error, as a portion of the variation in the independent variable has no effect on the dependent variable. Two empirical examples are presented: one on the relationship between AFDC and fertility and the other on the relationship between local economic conditions and AFDC expenditures.

Details

Modelling and Evaluating Treatment Effects in Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1380-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 March 2010

Jennifer Earl and Sarah A. Soule

Scholarship on the effects of various kinds of state repression (e.g., counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, protest policing) on subsequent dissent has produced a body of…

Abstract

Scholarship on the effects of various kinds of state repression (e.g., counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, protest policing) on subsequent dissent has produced a body of contradictory findings. In an attempt to better understand the effects of one form of state repression – protest policing – on one form of dissent – public protest – this paper examines the effects of various policing strategies used at protest events on subsequent protest levels in the United States between 1960 and 1990. Theoretically, we argue the effects of repression cannot be broadly theorized but instead need to be hypothesized at the level of particular police strategies and actions. We theorize and empirically examine the impacts of five police strategies, while also improving on prior analyses by producing a comprehensive model that examines lagged and nonlinear effects and examines the effects across the entire social movement sector, as well as across two specific movement industries. Results (1) confirm that not all police strategies have the same effects; (2) show that policing strategies tend to have predominately linear effects; (3) show that police actions have their strongest effects in the very short term, with few effects detectable after a few weeks; and (4) point to interesting differences in the effects of policing strategies on subsequent protest across different social movements.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-036-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Abhishek Kumar Sinha, Aswini Kumar Mishra, Manogna RL and Rohit Prabhudesai

The objective of the study is to analyse the impact of research and development investment on the firm performance of “small” scale firms vis-a-vis “medium”-scale firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the study is to analyse the impact of research and development investment on the firm performance of “small” scale firms vis-a-vis “medium”-scale firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The dataset comprised of a balanced panel of 486 research and development conducting Indian manufacturing small and medium enterprises, constructed for the period of 2006–2017. Fixed Effects, Random Effects Model and Hausmann test were used to analyse the determinants of firm performance in manufacturing small and medium enterprises in India.

Findings

It was found that from firms’ research and development (R&D) investments in terms of performance could be attained if simultaneously internationalisation and higher capital intensity could be achieved.

Practical implications

Managers could pay specific attention to the antecedents of firm performance and calibrate their R&D investment, internationalisation efforts and capital intensity simultaneously to achieve higher growth and productivity. For policymakers, the results provide an insight into how the firms in both categories could be differently incentivised, such that resources are better utilised.

Originality/value

The study analysed the determinants of firm performance in small and medium-sized firms at a disaggregate level as well as at a sectoral level using fixed effects, random effects and lagged effects to arrive at novel results, which have important implications for their competitiveness.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Peter Huaiyu Chen, Kasing Man, Junbo Wang and Chunchi Wu

We examine the informational roles of trades and time between trades in the domestic and overseas US Treasury markets. A vector autoregressive model is employed to assess…

Abstract

We examine the informational roles of trades and time between trades in the domestic and overseas US Treasury markets. A vector autoregressive model is employed to assess the information content of trades and time duration between trades. We find significant impacts of trades and time duration between trades on price changes. Larger trade size induces greater price revision and return volatility, and higher trading intensity is associated with a greater price impact of trades, a faster price adjustment to new information and higher volatility. Higher informed trading and lower liquidity contribute to larger bid–ask spreads off the regular daytime trading period.

Details

Advances in Pacific Basin Business, Economics and Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-285-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Zachary Alexander Smith and Muhammad Zubair Mumtaz

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is significant evidence that hedge fund managers engage in deceptive manipulation of their reported performance results.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is significant evidence that hedge fund managers engage in deceptive manipulation of their reported performance results.

Design/methodology/approach

A model of hedge fund performance has been developed using standard regression analysis incorporating dependent lagged variables and an autoregressive process. In addition, the extreme bounds analysis technique has been used to examine the robustness and sensitivity of the explanatory variables. Finally, the conditional influence of the global stock market’s returns on hedge fund performance and the conditional return behavior of the Hedge Fund Index’s performance have been explored.

Findings

This paper begins by identifying a model of hedge fund performance using passive index funds that is well specified and robust. Next, the lag structure associated with hedge fund returns has been examined and it has been determined that it seems to take the hedge fund managers two months to integrate the global stock market’s returns into their reported performance; however, the lagged variables were reduced from the final model. The paper continues to explore the smoothing behavior by conditioning the dependent lagged variables on positive and negative returns and find that managers are conservative in their estimates of positive performance events, but, when experiencing a negative result, they seem to attempt to rapidly integrate that effect into the return series. The strength of their integration increases as the magnitude of the negative performance increases. Finally, the performance of returns for both the Hedge Fund Index and the passive indices were examined and no significant differences between the conditional returns were found.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this analysis illustrate that hedge fund performance is not all that different from the performance of passive indices included in this paper, although it does offer investors access to a unique return distribution. From a management perspective, we are reminded that we need to be cautious about hastily arriving at conclusions about something that looks different or feels different from everything else, because, at times, our preconceived notions will cause us to avoid participating in something that may add value to our organizations. From an investment perspective, sometimes having something that looks and behaves differently from everything else, improves our investment experience.

Originality/value

This paper provides a well-specified and robust model of hedge fund performance and uses extreme bounds analysis to test the robustness of this model. This paper also investigates the smoothing behavior of hedge fund performance by segmenting the returns into two cohorts, and it finds that the smoothing behavior is only significant after the hedge funds produce positive performance results, the strength of the relationship between the global stock market and hedge fund performance is more economically significant if the market has generated a negative performance result in the previous period, and that as the previous period’s performance becomes increasingly negative, the strength of the relationship between the Hedge Fund Index and the global stock market increases.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Xiaogang He, Zhixin Wang, Lin Mei and Yanling Lian

The purpose of this paper is to assess the immediate and lagged effects of founder's turnover on firm performance, and test the moderating effects of enterprise scale and…

Downloads
1544

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the immediate and lagged effects of founder's turnover on firm performance, and test the moderating effects of enterprise scale and founders' tenure on enterprise performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper selects 307 listed companies founded by founder from the Listed Company's Financial Database provided by the China Center for Economic Research. Based on 1,535 observations, this paper tests the relationship between founder turnover and performance by using the random effect model and the fixed effect model.

Findings

It is found that founders' turnover will have a significant immediate and negative effect on firm performance. There exists a lagged effect of founders' turnover, but this lagged effect is not as strong as immediate effect. It is also found that the effect of founders' turnover has been moderated by firm size and founders' characteristics.

Practical implications

Founders should choose an appropriate time of leaving when the firm's performance has reached a level high enough for the successor to have a better chance of improving its future operations.

Originality/value

Although some scholars have recognized the special role of founders and that enterprises' performances are mainly determined by the founders, few have studied founders' turnover on firm performance directly and empirically. This paper expands understanding of the founders' departure behavior on firm performance.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 26000