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Abstract

Details

Designing and Tracking Knowledge Management Metrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-723-3

Abstract

Details

Critical Capabilities and Competencies for Knowledge Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-767-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

James J. Hoffman, Mark L. Hoelscher and Karma Sherif

This article attempts to begin the process of removing the cloak of causal ambiguity by examining the role that knowledge management has in the creation of the wide

Abstract

Purpose

This article attempts to begin the process of removing the cloak of causal ambiguity by examining the role that knowledge management has in the creation of the wide variety of competitive advantages found in some organizations. Specifically, this article aims to extend understanding in the field of knowledge management by examining how knowledge management can affect organizational performance, and by examining one possible determinant of an organization's capacity to manage knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews literature on resources‐advantage theory of the firm, social capital and knowledge management to propose ways within the organization to improve their ability to manage knowledge and achieve sustained superior performance. The paper is structured around the following constructs: resource‐advantage theory of the firm, social capital, and knowledge management.

Findings

Describes the relationship between social capital and knowledge management and how both help organizations achieve a sustained superior performance within the market. Suggests that organizations with high levels of social capital have more knowledgemanagement capabilities than organizations with low levels of social capital.

Research limitations/implications

This article extends prior research of knowledge management by proposing how social capital can positively impact the ability of organizations to manage knowledge.

Practical implications

Since resources within all businesses are relatively limited, and particularly so when the business is small relative to its competitors, the revelation that social capital can lead to more effective knowledge management makes the decision to support and nurture social‐capital development much more credible.

Originality/value

Because there is no existing literature that has examined the relationship between social capital, knowledge management, and organizational performance, this paper provides a foundation for future studies that examine the relationship between social capital and knowledge management.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Steven Walczak

To propose and evaluate a novel management structure that encourages knowledge sharing across an organization.

Abstract

Purpose

To propose and evaluate a novel management structure that encourages knowledge sharing across an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The extant literature on the impact of organizational culture and its link to management structure is examined and used to develop a new knowledge sharing management structure. Roadblocks to implementing a new management structure and methods for overcoming these impediments are discussed. The efficacy of the proposed management structure is evaluated empirically by examining its effect on organizations that have implemented portions of the proposed structure.

Findings

The foundational ideas behind the proposed knowledge management organizational structure and the structure itself have been implemented in parts at various organizations located both in the USA and internationally. While the full management structure model has not been evaluated, the portions implemented in various organizations have enabled these organizations to assume leading roles in their respective industries.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed knowledge sharing management structure has not been fully implemented under controlled circumstances. The empirical evaluation is performed on portions of the proposed model, thus the full impact of the proposed management structure may well exceed the described benefits and additional structural‐shift roadblocks may limit the realization of the proposed benefits.

Practical implications

The proposed knowledge sharing management structure gives managers a practical way to approach cross organizational knowledge sharing, which is frequently identified as a theoretical benefit of knowledge management. Means for diminishing or circumventing recognized impediments to organizational change are described to further facilitate the implementation of the proposed cross‐organizational knowledge sharing structure.

Originality/value

The proposed knowledge sharing management structure is organized around knowledge‐based teams of knowledge workers, but further extends this concept to include larger knowledge groups to transform an organization into a knowledge‐based organization. If an organization's functional structure can be successfully transformed, then this enables the maximization of competitive advantage realized through knowledge management initiatives, more specifically through knowledge sharing. Upper level management, who are responsible for organizational change are the primary audience, though the principals described may be implemented through a more grass roots approach by lower level management.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Xiangyi Lin, Qingpu Zhang and Xiaolin Han

The purpose of this paper is to utilize “Wuli‐Shili‐Renli (WSR)” system methodology to analyze complexity of knowledge and knowledge management and create models for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilize “Wuli‐Shili‐Renli (WSR)” system methodology to analyze complexity of knowledge and knowledge management and create models for knowledge management system (KMS) synthetically.

Design/methodology/approach

As a complex system, knowledge management should be analyzed and established by system methodologies. There are many system methodologies. Owing to WSR is characteristic of oriental culture; the paper introduces concept and working process of WSR system methodology in knowledge management from WSR perspective.

Findings

WSR system methodology can be used to analyze contents of WSR in KMS and to establish an effective KMS.

Research limitations/implications

How to define WSR in KMS is a little difficult for users.

Practical implications

A new approach for system analysis and establishment of a successful KMS.

Originality/value

The paper shows how the WSR system approach can integrate quantitative approach and qualitative analysis to analyze and establish a KMS synthetically.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 38 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Hamilton Mphidi and Retha Snyman

The intranet has emerged as one of today's most effective tools for knowledge management. This article reports on the extent to which three South African academic…

Abstract

The intranet has emerged as one of today's most effective tools for knowledge management. This article reports on the extent to which three South African academic libraries, selected by means of the purposive sampling method, utilise the intranet as a knowledge management tool. Based on the literature, knowledge management and an intranet are briefly defined. The advantages of the intranet as a knowledge management tool as well as the content of an intranet are discussed. The opinions about knowledge management and the utilisation of the intranet as a knowledge management tool in the three academic libraries are weighed up against the findings in the literature. It is clear that a strong awareness exists of the importance of knowledge management and the value of the intranet as a knowledge management tool. However, the potential of the intranet as a knowledge management tool is not utilised fully.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Cevat Celep and Buket Çetin

This research aims to find out teachers' perception about the behaviors of their school leaders with regard to knowledge management, and the changes in teachers' opinion…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to find out teachers' perception about the behaviors of their school leaders with regard to knowledge management, and the changes in teachers' opinion considering their sex, age, educational level, experiment and tenure.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of the research is primary schools teachers in Edirne, Turkey. A total of 430 questionnaires were evaluated. The scale developed to identify elementary school teachers' perception about knowledge management practices at their schools is based on four other different scales: “Know‐all 50: Knowledge Management Assessment”, “Knowledge Management Framework Assessment Exercise”, “Assessing Readiness for Managing Knowledge Assets”, and “Working with Knowledge”.

Findings

Findings of the research suggest that there are seven existing sub‐dimensions of knowledge management at schools in Turkey, namely: leadership, cultural structure, knowledge hubs and centers, tacit knowledge, explicit knowledge, knowledge vision, and learning culture. In addition to this, there is a significant relationship between the different sub‐dimensions of knowledge management and whether teachers have e‐mail addresses of their own, their schools have internet connection (for external knowledge), web site, computer network (for internal knowledge) and whether the school has a subscription to professional publications.

Originality/value

The researches in different countries show that knowledge management has nine sub‐dimensions but in Turkey there are seven. This scale needs to be applied to different organizational settings in order to be validated nationwide.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

G.K. KULULANGA and R. McCAFFER

The greatest challenge facing construction executives is how to manage their intellectual capital. The business environment has now entered a knowledge era, where knowledge

Abstract

The greatest challenge facing construction executives is how to manage their intellectual capital. The business environment has now entered a knowledge era, where knowledge has become power and learning rapidly and competently has become a pre‐eminent strategy for success. Thus, knowledge is rapidly becoming more important to organizations than financial resources, market positions, technology and other tangible assets. However, the management of intellectual capital is still an under‐charted territory within construction organizations. Managing know‐how, know‐what, know‐why is unlike managing finances or construction plant, yet intellectual

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Jinette de Gooijer

Measuring the business benefits of knowledge management is difficult. Even more so for public sector agencies whose outcomes are social benefits, rather than simple…

Abstract

Measuring the business benefits of knowledge management is difficult. Even more so for public sector agencies whose outcomes are social benefits, rather than simple profit. Describes an approach for measuring the performance of knowledge management strategies for a public sector agency in Victoria, Australia. Knowledge management is defined as those actions which support collaboration and integration. Two models are presented for measuring knowledge management performance and knowledge management behaviours: a performance framework based on the balanced scorecard approach, and a behaviour framework that identifies levels of practice demonstrated by individuals. The Knowledge Management Performance Scorecard maps the objectives for knowledge management across the balanced scorecard’s key result areas The Knowledge Management Behaviour Framework identifies seven levels of knowledge management skills for demonstrating collaborative behaviour. The framework also outlines what might be typical behaviours of managers and the roles they would assume in relation to individuals at each level.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Jennifer Rowley

Explores the essential nature of knowledge management, and identifies key issues that impact on the successful implementation of knowledge management strategies. Although…

Abstract

Explores the essential nature of knowledge management, and identifies key issues that impact on the successful implementation of knowledge management strategies. Although there is a recognition that the knowledge society and the knowledge economy have arrived, and that knowledge is a key business asset, organisations are still in the early stages of understanding the implications of knowledge management. Core themes for knowledge management relate to: the creation of knowledge repositories; the improvement of knowledge acquisition; the enhancement of the knowledge environment; and the management of knowledge as an asset. The embedding and embracing of knowledge management within an organisation requires attention to objectives, types of knowledge, technologies, and organisational roles. Knowledge management strategies need to be tailored to specific organisations.

Details

Library Management, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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