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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Omar S. Itani, Vishag Badrinarayanan and Deva Rangarajan

This study aims to develop and test a process model of the effect of social media use by business-to-business (B2B) salespeople on their value cocreation and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop and test a process model of the effect of social media use by business-to-business (B2B) salespeople on their value cocreation and cross/upselling performance. Adopting a research acquisition perspective, the authors claim that salesperson’s social media use is critical for generating social capital – an operant resource characterized by superior market knowledge, reputation and networking – which, in turn, directly and synergistically enhances value cocreation and cross/upselling outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed based on extant sales research on salesperson’s social media use and social capital theory. Data from B2B salespeople is analyzed using structural equation modeling to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results demonstrate that salespeople’s social media use enhances their social capital with support for direct effects on market knowledge and reputation, and indirect effect on networking. The results also show that the three aspects of social capital drive value cocreation, which enhances cross/upselling performance. Post hoc analysis shows the indirect effects of salesperson’s social media use as well as the interconnected effects of the aspects of social capital on value cocreation.

Practical implications

The study indicates that salespeople should be encouraged to use social media as a means for enhancing market knowledge and reputation, which can then be leveraged to build networking skills. Providing training to salespeople and coaching them on how to build their social capital is essential if organizations need to capitalize on novel ways to improve the value cocreation performance of their sales teams.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates how salespeople’s social media use can enhance their social capital, which, in turn, is critical for value cocreation and cross/upselling performance. The proposed framework opens opportunities for future studies to examine the role of salesperson social capital and value cocreation in B2B exchanges.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Agnieszka Chwialkowska, Waheed Akbar Bhatti, Ahmad Arslan and Mario Glowik

The purpose of this paper is to study the US-based (American) physiotherapy customers’ goals to engage in value cocreation activities during their well-being experience.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the US-based (American) physiotherapy customers’ goals to engage in value cocreation activities during their well-being experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform Smart PLS-SEM analysis of the primary data of physiotherapy service customers in the USA.

Findings

The findings show that the US well-being customer engages in physiotherapy for individualizing, empowering, development, concerted and ethical motives but not for relating motives. These findings are contrasted with previous research to show that the service-dominant logic is not sufficient to account for the contextual complexity of the well-being experience and to explain the identified differences across culturally different customer segments.

Research limitations/implications

By integrating insights from health-care and cross-cultural literature, the authors highlight the importance of relationship dynamics, culture and institutional context in well-being sector and develop a more comprehensive understanding of the cocreation behaviors in this industry. This helps advance the value cocreation research in well-being sector and promote the well-being experiences such as physiotherapy.

Originality/value

The authors draw from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and challenge the service-dominant (S-D) logic as insufficient in explaining the value cocreation between the customer and expert in the well-being sector. The authors adapt physician–patient relationship model from health-care literature and cultural values of power distance from cross-cultural literature to complement the S-D logic to account for the complexity and nuanced context of the well-being cocreation experience.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2022

Christopher Ansell, Eva Sørensen and Jacob Torfing

This chapter explains how cocreation can be supported by establishing platforms, which provide knowledge, resources, and opportunities for local actors to come together in…

Abstract

This chapter explains how cocreation can be supported by establishing platforms, which provide knowledge, resources, and opportunities for local actors to come together in cocreation arenas. Platforms make it easy for local actors to connect, interact, and engage in productive joint activity. The chapter provides an overview of different types of platforms and describes their distinctive organizing logic, which includes mediating the relationship between different stakeholders, scaffolding their joint action, and leveraging their capacity for change. The chapter identifies important platform dynamics, such as attractor and amplifier effects, synergy, scaling, and social learning, that enable them to successfully support cocreation. Finally, the chapter discusses how platforms themselves can be designed to enhance these dynamics.

Details

Co-Creation for Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-798-2

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2022

Christopher Ansell, Eva Sørensen and Jacob Torfing

This chapter examines the translation of generic global goals into local action. It first discusses the translation of global goals into national agendas and the…

Abstract

This chapter examines the translation of generic global goals into local action. It first discusses the translation of global goals into national agendas and the challenges of localizing the goals. Localizing the goals is essential for ensuring that the SDGs reflect local needs, norms, and values, thus ensuring that local actors find them relevant and meaningful. The chapter argues that cocreation is a key vehicle for the localization of the SDGs and identifies the key benefits that arise from using cocreation as a localization strategy. Cocreation can foster the will and capacity for local governments and communities to advance the cause of sustainability. Cocreation can help communities integrate the sustainable development goals, identify hidden resources, build support networks, create social accountability, etc.

Details

Co-Creation for Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-798-2

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2022

Christopher Ansell, Eva Sørensen and Jacob Torfing

Abstract

Details

Co-Creation for Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-798-2

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Sabrina Bonomi, Francesca Ricciardi, Cecilia Rossignoli and Alessandro Zardini

This study investigates (1) the processes through which social enterprises develop resilient organizational logics and (2) the key resilience factors in the organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates (1) the processes through which social enterprises develop resilient organizational logics and (2) the key resilience factors in the organizational logics of successful social enterprises. The organizational logic is conceptualized here as the dynamic system of roles, rules and social expectations that result from the organization's business model, impact model and organizational form.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts an inductive approach to identify emerging resilience factors and processes in an exemplary case of social entrepreneurship (a work integration venture). The longitudinal data collection on this case took place from 2011 to 2016, based on approximately 440 h of participant observation and 10 semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The inductive analysis suggests that social enterprises develop resilient organizational logics through multi-level recursive processes of bridging institutional work. These processes enable the development of an organizational logic that is internally robust while linking distant practices, needs and expectations. The authors conceptualize these characteristics into a novel construct, the organizational logic's bridging power, which is operationalizable through two dimensions (hybridity-based and cocreation-based bridging power) and five sub-dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Like in all inductive studies, further research is needed to validate the proposed model. The new proposed construct “organizational logic's bridging power” is, interestingly, a meta-theoretical concept encouraging cross-fertilization between the literature on institutional logics and that on value cocreation.

Originality/value

The process development model proposed by this study highlights the importance of network-level institutional work for developing cocreation-based resilience. Furthermore, this study shows how institutional theories could be complemented with other bodies of knowledge in order to understand social enterprise resilience.

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

May-Kristin Vespestad and Anne Clancy

The purpose of this study is to explore perceptions of successful collaboration by a group of professionals in primary health care, using service-dominant logic (SDL) as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore perceptions of successful collaboration by a group of professionals in primary health care, using service-dominant logic (SDL) as a theoretical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This study carries out secondary analysis of the results from a Norwegian national survey on collaboration amongst professionals in primary health care services.

Findings

Findings illustrate that SDL can provide a theoretical framework for understanding health and social care services. The study provides evidence for the relevance of the theory at micro level. Viewing primary care through the lens of SDL enables an understanding of the applicability of market principles to health and social care. The study illustrates the relevance of the following principles: services are the fundamental basis of exchange; indirect exchange can mask the fundamental basis of exchange. Operant resources are the fundamental source of strategic benefit; actors cannot deliver value but can participate in the creation and offering of value propositions.

Social implications

Awareness of the use of SDL in health care services can be positive for service provision and it could be incorporated as a supplementary perspective in educational programs for health care professionals.

Originality/value

Applying principles from SDL as a theoretical framework for primary care services challenges the conventional understanding of marketing in health services. This paper responds to the need for a more in-depth understanding of how SDL can help health care professionals recognize their role as participants in providing seamless health care at micro level.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Lynn M. Martin, Gemma Lord and Izzy Warren-Smith

This paper aims to use (in)visibility as a lens to understand the lived experience of six women managers in the headquarters of a large multinational organization in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use (in)visibility as a lens to understand the lived experience of six women managers in the headquarters of a large multinational organization in the UK to identify how “gender” is expressed in the context of organizational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers take a phenomenological approach via qualitative data collection with a purposeful sample – the six female managers in a group of 24. Data were collected through quarterly semi-structured interviews over 12 months with the themes – knowledge, interaction and gender.

Findings

Organizations seek to build advantage to gain and retain competitive leadership. Their resilience in a changing task environment depends on their ability to recognize, gain and use knowledge likely to deliver these capabilities. Here, gender was a barrier to effective organizational learning with women’s knowledge and experience often unseen and unheard.

Research limitations/implications

This is a piece of research limited to exploration of gender as other, but ethnicity, age, social class, disability and sexual preference, alone or in combination, may be equally subject to invisibility in knowledge terms; further research would be needed to test this however.

Practical implications

Practical applications relate to the need for organizations to examine and address their operations for exclusion based on perceived “otherness”. Gendered organizations cause problems for their female members, but they also exclude the experience and knowledge of key individuals as seen here, where gender impacted on effective knowledge sharing and cocreation of knowledge.

Social implications

The study offers further evidence of gendered organizations and their impacts on organizational effectiveness, but it also offers insights into the continues social acceptance of a masculinized normative model for socio-economic practice.

Originality/value

This exploration of gender and organizational learning offers new insights to help explain the way in which organizational learning occurs – or fails to occur – with visibility/invisibility of one group shaped by gendered attitudes and processes. It shows that organizational learning is not gender neutral (as it appears in mainstream organizational learning research) and calls for researchers to include this as a factor in future research.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Christina Marouli, Anastasia Misseyanni, Paraskevi Papadopoulou and Miltiadis D. Lytras

Contemporary globalized societies face important environmental and social problems that require urgent action and citizen engagement. Active learning in contemporary…

Abstract

Contemporary globalized societies face important environmental and social problems that require urgent action and citizen engagement. Active learning in contemporary societies is being reemphasized in order to prepare active learners, capable of critical thinking and innovative problem solving and able to become responsible citizens. Environmental Education (EE) and its descendant Education for Sustainability (EFS), or Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), have been a very important first effort for introducing active learning in contemporary education at all educational levels. They constitute an important variant of active learning. EE and EFS by definition propose and adopt active learning and experiential methods, as they seek to prepare people that will work for a healthy environment and better societies. And this is where the difference lies between EE/EFS and the generic active-learning approaches. EE or EFS are committed active-learning approaches; they have an explicit goal to work for social and environmental change.

The transition from learners to active learners is addressed by active learning, which however assumes that active learners will also become responsible and active citizens. EE and EFS have however demonstrated that this is not an obvious development. Education should be clear about its purpose – individual change, empowerment, integration, or social transformation – and pedagogical methods and tools should be selected appropriately.

This chapter first discusses the main characteristics of EE/EFS. Then, it explores what facilitates the transition from active learners to active citizens, based on lessons from EE and EFS. Finally, it reflects on the implications of these lessons for Higher Education and, as a result, a new vision for Higher Education and a brief guide for educators and Higher Educational managers are proposed.

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2022

Xhimi Hysa and Artemisa Themeli

This study aims to explore how interorganizational coworking spaces (CWS) affect complexity, resilience, open innovation and knowledge cocreation.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how interorganizational coworking spaces (CWS) affect complexity, resilience, open innovation and knowledge cocreation.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study using the exploratory design. Data are gathered through semistructured interviews and naturalistic observation in six different CWS.

Findings

In line with previous studies, the findings show that being in a CWS with professionals of various backgrounds and contained levels of diversity make people prone to communication and knowledge sharing. Differently from previous research about knowledge creation in CWS, this study discovered that knowledge cocreation was only averagely affected. Complexity and resilience were the most influenced dimensions with scores higher than average, followed by open innovation and knowledge cocreation.

Research limitations/implications

Main limitations are related to the qualitative method itself which may not reach the data saturation and with the nonsynergistic analysis of all dimensions together. A further limitation arose because of the COVID-19 pandemic which contributed to downsizing the number of participants while restricting the options of the involved research instruments. The implications for research are related to a need for further studies using large-scale surveys to strengthen the reliability of research. Additionally, more research is needed to explore the multiple dimensions of open innovation, complexity and resilience in CWS.

Practical implications

For CWS providers, it is recommended to create thematic/clustered areas of collaboration based on specific professions. For early-stage businesses, freelancers and micro/entrepreneurial firms that do not wish to lease their own office, CWS provide an opportunity for value cocreation and open innovation.

Social implications

CWS, either physical or virtual, can be used as a retreat approach and a socialization platform, especially for those in need to recover from post-traumatic stress due to the imposed isolation caused by COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

Given the unexplored phenomena of complexity and resilience in CWS, the major contribution of this research is related to the impact of interorganizational coworking upon complexity and resilience.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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