Search results

1 – 10 of over 17000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Chuong Hong Pham, Hung Vu Nguyen, Mai Thi Thu Le, Long Thanh Do and Phuong Thi Tung Nguyen

This paper employed the self-determination theory (SDT) to examine the synergistic impacts of intrinsic, extrinsic and prosocial motivations in promoting sustained…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper employed the self-determination theory (SDT) to examine the synergistic impacts of intrinsic, extrinsic and prosocial motivations in promoting sustained pro-environmental consumption behaviors (PECB). To provide evidence for the study’s theoretical framework, the authors focus on the behavior of reducing single-use plastics.

Design/methodology/approach

A mall-intercept survey for consumption of single-use plastic products in three big cities of Vietnam (Hanoi, Da Nang and Ho Chi Minh city) was conducted to test the theoretical framework. In total, 468 consumers completed the questionnaires. Data were analyzed with SPSS and AMOS.

Findings

Intrinsic and prosocial motivations are found to be significant predictors of sustained PECB. More importantly, beyond the direct effects of intrinsic and prosocial motivations, the authors also found positive interaction effects between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and between intrinsic and prosocial motivation on encouraging sustained PECB.

Originality/value

This research offers a new insight for encouraging sustained PECB. Different from the extant perspectives which usually deal with initiating PECB, the authors emphasize sustaining the behavior. Moreover, this research examines the interaction effects between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations and between intrinsic and prosocial motivations in sustaining PECB.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Opal Donaldson and Evan W. Duggan

The purpose of this research is to develop a Social Information System research model that uses the core constructs intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop a Social Information System research model that uses the core constructs intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and amotivation to explain social networking adoption among tweens, teens and young adults.

Methodology

In developing the research model, we triangulated theories to examine the different orientations of motivation. The data collection process included a stratified sample size of 270 respondents. Following data collection we analyzed the results using structural equation modeling in the Partial Least Square software package.

Findings

The constructs amotivation, intrinsic and extrinsic motivations were all statistically significant in explaining continuance intention to use social networking services (SNS).

Practical implications

Researchers and practitioners have intimated that although there has been a rise in the number of persons accessing and becoming members of SNS, several subscribers who join subsequently leave after a minimal period. The practical implication of this study lies in providing a preliminary understanding of what determines or inhibits continuance intention of SNS membership.

Originality/value

Despite efforts, research in IS and technology acceptance literature regarding SNS diffusion is limited in scope. The theoretical implication of this study lies in the model that has been developed and validated to provide a more effective tool for the scholarly evaluation of SNS adoption. Existing adoption models are insufficient to explain voluntary technology usage of this nature.

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Woogul Lee

Many psychologists posit that intrinsic motivation generated by personal interest and spontaneous satisfactions is qualitatively different from extrinsic motivation

Abstract

Many psychologists posit that intrinsic motivation generated by personal interest and spontaneous satisfactions is qualitatively different from extrinsic motivation generated by external rewards. However, the contemporary neural understanding of human motivation has been developed almost exclusively based on the neural mechanisms of extrinsic motivation. In neuroscience studies on extrinsic motivation, striatum activity has been consistently observed as the core neural system related to human motivation. Recently, a few studies have started examining the neural system behind intrinsic motivation. Though these studies have found that striatum activity is crucial for the generation of intrinsic motivation, the unique neural basis of intrinsic motivation has not yet been fully identified. I suggest that insular cortex activity, known to be related to intrinsic enjoyment and satisfaction, is a unique neural component of intrinsic motivation. In this chapter, I addressed the theoretical background to and empirical evidence for this postulation.

Details

Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-474-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Niels Hoornweg, Pascale Peters and Beatrice van der Heijden

This survey study among 111 teleworkers in a bank organization investigated the relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity, and whether this…

Abstract

This survey study among 111 teleworkers in a bank organization investigated the relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity, and whether this relationship was mediated by employees’ intrinsic motivation. Also the moderating role of office hours in the model’s associations was studied. Based on the Job Demands-Resources Model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) and the professional isolation literature (e.g., Golden, Vega, & Dino, 2008), we developed and tested a set of hypotheses. Partly in line with expectations, we found a direct curvilinear relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity, characterized by a slight, non-significant positive association at the low telework intensity end, and a significant negative association for the high telework intensity end. Strikingly, we neither found support for a mediating role of intrinsic motivation, nor for a moderation effect of the number of office hours in the relationship between telework intensity and intrinsic motivation. However, the direct relationship between telework intensity and individual productivity appeared to be moderated by the number of office hours. It was concluded that consequences for productivity are contingent on telework intensity, and that the number of office hours has an important impact on the consequences of different telework intensities. The study’s outcomes can inform management and HR practitioners to understand how to implement and appropriately make use of telework.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Matt Bloom and Amy E. Colbert

Intrinsic motivation occurs due to positive reactions that arise directly from engagement in work activities. Scholars have asserted that intrinsic motivation plays an…

Abstract

Intrinsic motivation occurs due to positive reactions that arise directly from engagement in work activities. Scholars have asserted that intrinsic motivation plays an important role in organizational phenomena such as creativity (George, 2007), leadership (Piccolo & Colquitt, 2006), and performance (Gagné & Deci, 2005). We review the research literature on intrinsic motivation and provide an overview and integration of the leading theories. We then develop a conceptual model in which positive affect serves as a primary cause of intrinsic motivation. We discuss how affect alone may induce intrinsic motivation, how affect may lead to nonconscious experiences of intrinsic motivation, and how affect and cognitions may work in concert to produce the strongest and most persistent intrinsic motivation experiences. We conclude by suggesting new avenues for research that might be pursued using this cognitive–affective model of intrinsic motivation.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-554-0

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Weilin Su, Bei Lyu, Hui Chen and Yanzi Zhang

With the rapid development of the service industry, service innovation has gradually become a hot topic in business today. How to further improve employees' service…

Downloads
6093

Abstract

Purpose

With the rapid development of the service industry, service innovation has gradually become a hot topic in business today. How to further improve employees' service innovative behaviors has become critical to organizations' survival and success. Servant leadership, as a leadership style characterized by serving others, is closely related to employees' service innovative behaviors. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a theoretical framework to examine the influence of servant leadership on employees' service innovative behavior, the mediating role of intrinsic motivation and the moderating role of identification with the leader.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the theoretical model, a multi-time survey method was used to collect data from 381employees from a large high-tech company in Mainland China.

Findings

The results confirm that servant leadership can promote employees' service innovative behavior and intrinsic motivation. Meanwhile, employees' intrinsic motivation partly mediates the influence of servant leadership on their service innovative behavior. Moreover, this mediating relationship is conditional on the moderating role of individual identification with the leader in the path from servant leadership to individual intrinsic motivation.

Research limitations/implications

The key limitation of this study lies in the representativeness of sample data, which is the convenience of non-probability sampling and self-reported data only from a large high-tech company in China.

Practical implications

This study not only further verified a promotion factor of individual service innovative behavior from the perspective of leader influence, but also enriched the understanding of the positive influence of servant leadership on employees.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the relationships among servant leadership, employees' intrinsic motivation, identification with the leader and service innovative behavior. The results may help to open the “black box” of the relationship between servant leadership and employees' service innovative behavior by introducing their intrinsic motivation. The conclusions also indicate employees' identification with the leader is an important boundary condition among their relationships. Particularly, it not only moderates the relationship between servant leadership and intrinsic motivation, but also moderates the mediating role of intrinsic motivation.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Anders Dysvik and Bård Kuvaas

Mastery goals and intrinsic motivation have separately been found to predict employee turnover and turnover intention, respectively. The purpose of the present study was…

Downloads
13681

Abstract

Purpose

Mastery goals and intrinsic motivation have separately been found to predict employee turnover and turnover intention, respectively. The purpose of the present study was to examine their relative and combined influence on turnover intention in terms of a direct model and a moderated model.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey was conducted among employees representing more than 400 organizations from a wide range of industrial sectors. The theoretical or subject scope of the paper was to integrate motivational antecedents for employee turnover.

Findings

When assessed jointly, intrinsic motivation was the strongest predictor of turnover intention. Mastery‐approach goals were positively related to turnover intention, but this relationship was moderated by intrinsic motivation. The relationship between mastery‐approach goals and turnover intention was only positive for employees low in intrinsic motivation.

Research limitations/implications

The two most important limitations are the cross‐sectional nature of the study and the reliance on self‐reported questionnaire data. Consequently, experimental and/or longitudinal studies are needed to examine causality issues.

Practical implications

The results suggest that intrinsic motivation holds a salient role for predicting turnover intention. For managers and organizations, then, emphasis should be placed on facilitating work environments supportive of intrinsic motivation in order to maintain employees' turnover intention at low levels.

Originality/value

The most interesting finding is that intrinsic motivation held a substantially stronger relationship with turnover intention than that of mastery‐approach goals. In addition, support for the buffering role of intrinsic motivation was found, as mastery‐approach goals were unrelated to turnover intention when intrinsic motivation was high.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Carolyn Stringer, Jeni Didham and Paul Theivananthampillai

This paper aims to explore the complex relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, pay satisfaction and job satisfaction at the retailer that uses a…

Downloads
34628

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the complex relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, pay satisfaction and job satisfaction at the retailer that uses a pay‐for‐performance plan for front‐line employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on a single organization case study across seven stores, and uses a survey, archival documents, open‐ended questions and researcher interaction with employees and managers.

Findings

The results provide some support for the complementary nature of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Intrinsic motivation was positively associated with pay and job satisfactions, whereas extrinsic motivation was negatively associated with job satisfaction, and not associated with pay satisfaction. The qualitative insights indicate that pay fairness is important, and those who perceived pay was not fair generally made comparisons with others or felt that pay did not reflect their effort. It is also found that the majority of employees perceived that goals were clear.

Research limitations/implications

The dominance of extrinsic motivation without including behavioural, social, and psychological factors in agency theory research is questioned. The research finds no support for “crowding out”, but rather finds some evidence of “crowding in” where intrinsic motivation is enhanced, to the detriment of extrinsic motivation.

Practical implications

The findings highlight that managers should enhance both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and pay employees well to increase job satisfaction.

Originality/value

Few studies examine incentives for front‐line employees, and there is evidence that minimum wage employees can have high intrinsic motivation. Perceptions of pay fairness can vary across motivation levels, age, and gender.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Jungin Kim

Based on motivation theories, such as self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether intrinsic and extrinsic motivations significantly…

Downloads
3687

Abstract

Purpose

Based on motivation theories, such as self-determination theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine whether intrinsic and extrinsic motivations significantly influence burnout and turnover intention in the public sector. Furthermore, the authors assessed the mediating effect of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and public service motivation (PSM) on the relationship between intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and burnout/turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of 203 public employees from local governments in South Korea, this study conducted ordinary least squares regression analysis to investigate the relationships among intrinsic/extrinsic motivation, OCB, PSM, and burnout/turnover intention.

Findings

The authors found that intrinsic motivation had a significantly negative effect on both burnout and turnover intention. Extrinsic motivation had a significantly positive effect only on burnout. Lastly, OCB and PSM had a mediating effect on the relationships between intrinsic motivation and burnout.

Originality/value

These results provide some insights into the effects of job motivation on burnout and turnover intention in the public sector. Particularly, this research highlights the importance of intrinsic motivation, OCB, and PSM in decreasing burnout and the importance of intrinsic motivation in decreasing turnover intention of public employees.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Jurgita Lazauskaite-Zabielske, Ieva Urbanaviciute and Dalia Bagdziuniene

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of prosocial and intrinsic motivation and their interaction in predicting employees’ organizational citizenship behaviour…

Downloads
4793

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of prosocial and intrinsic motivation and their interaction in predicting employees’ organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB) and its dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 884 employees from Lithuanian public sector were surveyed. The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression and moderation analyses.

Findings

The results revealed that prosocial and intrinsic motivations predicted OCB and its dimensions. Moreover, intrinsic motivation was found to moderate the relationship between prosocial motivation and OCB and four of its dimensions, i.e. intrinsic motivation strengthened the relationship between prosocial motivation and OCB and its dimensions of altruism, courtesy, conscientiousness, and initiative.

Research limitations/implications

The correlational design of the study does not allow making causal statements. In addition, the sample consisted of public sector employees only; therefore, caution should be made when applying the results to private sector employees. Finally, since all measures were self-reported, the data may suffer from common method bias.

Originality/value

This study contributes to investigation of motivational antecedents of OCB by revealing the importance of prosocial and intrinsic motivation in predicting employees’ citizenship behaviour.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 17000