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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Nguyen Quynh Phuong and Mokbul Morshed Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to map the “migration pathways” (King and Skeldon, 2010) followed by interviews with a group of Vietnamese international labour migrants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map the “migration pathways” (King and Skeldon, 2010) followed by interviews with a group of Vietnamese international labour migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Through 50 in-depth interviews, the authors identify the reasons that explain the pathways observed.

Findings

The authors found that more than half of the interviewees did what King and Skeldon describe as a U-turn, whereby the migrants go abroad for work directly from their home town and return to settle there. The remainder did a J-turn, meaning the migrants returned and settled elsewhere. The majority of those doing a J-turn moved to another town/city within the province of their home town. Few return migrants settled outside their home province. The main explanations for the U-turn choice include existing investment in immobile assets in their home town, strong family ties, parental care obligations, lack of skill acquisition from international labour migration, age and for married migrants having children. Poor conditions in their home town, the absence of local job opportunities and better schooling for children were important considerations that made the J-turn more desirable. Having family ties in a new location, and affording the investment needed to settle in a new town, were important explanations to make the J-turn possible.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the need for economic development in rural Vietnam, including the creation of decentralised and sustainable livelihoods, so that return migrants have opportunities to reintegrate within their home communities.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Ana Aliverti and Celine Tan

Global mobility remains one of the most pressing challenges of our times. Countries in the north are turning to major ‘sending’ countries in the south to secure their…

Abstract

Global mobility remains one of the most pressing challenges of our times. Countries in the north are turning to major ‘sending’ countries in the south to secure their cooperation in controlling their borders and in repatriation processes. By explicitly linking migration to global security threats and weak governance, these migration control initiatives are justified by development goals and sometimes financed by official development assistance (ODA). By connecting criminology with international development scholarship, this chapter seeks to advance our understanding of the novel intersections between criminal justice, security and development to govern mass migration. Focusing on UK policies and the analysis of specific programmes, it interrogates what does the sustainable development goal (10.7) of facilitating ‘orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration’ concretely entail? And to what extent does the language of ‘managed migration’ legitimise restrictive border controls policies and even conflict with other global development goals?

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Crime, Justice and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-355-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Peter Enderwick, Rosalie L. Tung and Henry F.L. Chung

This paper aims to examine the myriad linkages between cross‐border migration and international business activity through a conceptual framework of international arbitrage.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the myriad linkages between cross‐border migration and international business activity through a conceptual framework of international arbitrage.

Design/methodology/approach

While labour is internationally the least integrated of the various markets (capital, product, labour) the increasing co‐movement of both tasks and workers has created opportunities for the arbitrage and exploitation of differences between national labour markets. Because national labour markets typically display the two characteristics of separation and price discrepancy it is possible to utilise the principle of arbitrage and within this framework examine cost, intellectual, knowledge and employment arbitrage.

Findings

The discussion suggests that international business offers valuable insights into migration processes and effects which have been dominated by the research approaches of other disciplines. It is found that migrants can help reduce transaction costs for bilateral trade, contribute to nostalgic trade, encourage outsourcing and foreign direct investment through referrals and performance signalling, assist country of origin development through remittances and return migration and provide valuable knowledge to their employers in the country of residence.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is a conceptual one which offers no new empirical results but does provide a context for the interpretation of the more specialised studies that appear in this special issue. There is a need for research on this topic to be firmly grounded in the contemporary context of an increasingly integrated global economy. It also suggests a number of specific areas where further work would be useful.

Originality/value

The key contribution of the paper is in developing a comprehensive conceptual framework – that of labour market arbitrage – which enables a clearer understanding of the complex impacts of international migration on international business activity. It also distinguishes between direct and indirect effects.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Ayuba Seidu, Gulcan Onel and Charles B. Moss

A major policy issue facing leaders in the developing world is whether international migration, through remittances, contributes to the development process in…

Abstract

Purpose

A major policy issue facing leaders in the developing world is whether international migration, through remittances, contributes to the development process in migrant-sending communities or impedes the efficient allocation of labor and human capital at the origin countries. This study examines the impact of remittance inflows on out-farm migration of farm labor toward the nonfarm sector. Specifically, this study shows how international migrant remittances may alter the predictions of out-farm migration models by Harris–Todaro.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use unbalanced panel time-series data on 77 developing countries between 1991 and 2010 within a dynamic panel time-series framework to estimate the impact of remittances on the out-farm migration rate.

Findings

The authors find two competing effects of remittances on out-farm migration of labor in developing countries. First, remittances decelerate the out-farm migration rates by supplementing farm income and consumption expenditures. Second, remittances provide a source of investment in nonfarm activities that increase the rate of migration out of agriculture over time. Combining these effects, on average, our elasticity estimates indicate that a 10% increase in remittances reduces the migration out of agriculture, on average, by 0.5% in developing countries over time.

Research limitations/implications

The authors findings align with the “developmentalist” or “optimistic” views of international migration. International migration, through remittances, help make the inevitable transition out of the farm sector smoother for developing countries.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to extend the empirical literature on macro-level determinants of out-farm migration within the Harris–Todaro framework to explicitly account for the impacts of remittances inflows into developing countries that the new economics of labor migration (NELM) theory hypothesizes.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2018

Jorge Alcaraz and Elizabeth Salamanca

The purpose of this study is to identify, based on social network theory, the relationship between the direction of international migration (immigration/emigration) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify, based on social network theory, the relationship between the direction of international migration (immigration/emigration) and the international movement of enterprises and their location.

Design/methodology/approach

A traditional gravity model and the Tobit estimation method are applied to three groups of countries from three different regions: Latin America, North America and the European Union. The study considers a period from 2001 to 2012.

Findings

The main results suggest that the international migration that goes from the European Union and North America to Latin America is related with the firms’ internationalization and their respective location.

Practical implications

Given that migration can be an important and reliable source of information, trust and knowledge, managers should see it as a “bridge” between the home and host countries, which, in turn, can increase their competitive advantage.

Social implications

Governments can learn how migration and outward foreign direct investment interact. In addition, they could develop political frameworks to accurately and effectively manage international migration (immigration and emigration) and FDI in the best interests of the stakeholders.

Originality/value

This study extends the social network theory by suggesting that networks are not only related with firms’ expansion abroad but as well with their location. This statement could be generalizable as long as emigration/networks (ethnic ties) are considered the links between the home and the host country.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Panos Hatzipanayotou

Open economy macroeconomic models generally overlook the effects ofinternational migration and remittances on income and welfare. Atwo‐country temporary equilibrium model…

Abstract

Open economy macroeconomic models generally overlook the effects of international migration and remittances on income and welfare. A two‐country temporary equilibrium model is presented which incorporates trade theoretic elements of international migration and remittances. In the model, an expansionary incomes, or a trade, policy by the host country induces migration, while expansionary demand policies in the source country discourage migration. In all cases, however, when some degree of international migration exists, potential income and welfare gains to both countries induced by such policies exceed the equivalent policy gains where international migration and remittances are absent.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Graţiela Georgiana Noja, Mirela Cristea, Petru Ştefea and Ciprian Panzaru

Introduction: International migration, a complex, dynamic and multifaceted process, grasps important challenges for the European economies, through its advantages and…

Abstract

Introduction: International migration, a complex, dynamic and multifaceted process, grasps important challenges for the European economies, through its advantages and pitfalls.

Aim: This research is conducted to examine the fundamental credentials of immigration in Europe and its perspectives within the Brexit framework, an ongoing process that induced profound implications.

Method: The authors have applied the cluster analysis and structural equations as the main research methods on a balanced panel comprising 10 receiving countries (most targeted by migrants), members of the European Union (EU-10), for the 2000–2019 timespan (2019 being a Brexit milestone year).The authors have separately extrapolated a sample for 2020–2025 that was further used to identify some perspectives after the Brexit timeline in terms of migration determinants and effects on EU-10 host economies. Cluster analysis is based on a key scenario related to wellbeing, living standards (income level) and poverty risk at destination. These credentials are essentialfor the migration decision and important elements of migrant labour market integration strategies with keen economic consequences, further assessed through the structural equation models.

Findings: Results show that during 2000–2019, among EU-10, the main destination country for immigrants and asylum seekers in terms of welfare and living standards is Germany (both for economic and humanitarian migration), along with the United Kingdom (in the case of economic migration). This situation tends to remain unchanged for the following years even in the Brexit context, as reflected by the 2020–2025 forecast scenarios. Immigration effects on labour market outcomes and economic welfare are extremely significant, being largely discussed within the chapter.

Details

Uncertainty and Challenges in Contemporary Economic Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-095-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2015

Jenina Joy Chavez and Nicola Piper

At global fora which discuss the regulation of international migration the Philippine government is typically hailed a “good practice example” for its institutional as…

Abstract

At global fora which discuss the regulation of international migration the Philippine government is typically hailed a “good practice example” for its institutional as well as legal framework and proactive interest in the welfare of its citizens. The Philippine history of migration policy making is indeed shaped by a shift from “exporting workers” to an increasingly comprehensive rights-sensitive approach that addresses most aspects of migration: the regulation of recruitment agencies, pre-migration training, insurance systems, overseas voting rights, consular services, social rights of the left behind, and re-integration of returned migrants. This state of affairs, however, has not always been like that and is largely the result of activism by the vibrant migrant rights movement in the Philippines which reaches across the world. The case of the Philippine also shows mixed approaches to government-social movement relations, characterized by both pressure politics and critical engagement.

Considerable gaps and loopholes remain in this web of rights-based policy aspects. Structural weaknesses are major problems that need to be addressed if labor migration is to evolve into a truly choice-driven economic decision. Still, comparatively and historically speaking, the Philippines have come a long way. The combined effects of leadership from below and leadership from above had led to some concrete results – even if far from perfect – in the betterment of many migrants’ lives.

Details

Asian Leadership in Policy and Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-883-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Walter R. Erdelen and Jacques G. Richardson

This paper aims to discuss the history of human migration till the present day.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the history of human migration till the present day.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the human movement from pre-hominid times, forming patterns of existence. Thus, ambient sun and water, weather and climate extremes, shelter, food supply, natural or human-made disasters gave rise to Homo sapiens’ wanderlust.

Findings

Despite obstacles, formidable barriers and even perilous deterrents, the species explored and exploited new soils and waters, whether beneficial or destructive of nature’s ample providence.

Originality/value

The authors treat societal as well as individual action, cultural behavior and the emergence of economic anthropology. Migratory legislation and regulation now risk transformation into resentment and then xenophobia.

Details

foresight, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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