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Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Bernd Kupka

Purpose –– This chapter shows the connection between the reality of intercultural communication training and its importance to the development of intercultural

Abstract

Purpose –– This chapter shows the connection between the reality of intercultural communication training and its importance to the development of intercultural communication competence, symbolised by the Rainbow Model of Intercultural Communication Competence.

Methodology/approach –– 405 useable questionnaires (response rate=19.4%) were used from 56 German MNEs in a convenience sample of companies in the high-tech industry that are suppliers for the automotive, aviation, optical and chemical industry.

Findings –– German MNCs provide traditional intercultural communication training sparingly to expatriates, but with adjustments depending on the target country. Only 41% of training recipients deemed the training helpful for their mission. Non-traditional training methods are administered more consistently.

Practical implications –– The Rainbow Model of Intercultural Communication Competence should guide the implementation of customised intercultural communication training efforts.

Social implications –– Assisting expatriates in their development of intercultural communication competence via intercultural communication training fulfils the social responsibility of multinational enterprises.

Originality/value of chapter –– This chapter provides guidance to human resource specialists in the international arena to design and implement customisable intercultural communication training programmes for expatriates.

Details

The Role of Expatriates in MNCs Knowledge Mobilization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-113-8

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Frank Fitzpatrick

Abstract

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Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Andrea Graf and Marion Mertesacker

The purpose of this paper is to develop recommendations for measures assessing intercultural training needs for international human resource management. Based on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop recommendations for measures assessing intercultural training needs for international human resource management. Based on scientific as well as application‐oriented criteria the aim is to select six measures assessing general intercultural competencies and with the help of behaviour ratings in interactive intercultural exercises to evaluate the psychometric quality and practicability of the questionnaires for training purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

Psychometric quality including prognostic power of ICSI, FLCS, NVCCS, ISAS, TIHK, and SIB was tested by correlating subjects' questionnaires results with observations of their actual behaviour in intercultural exercises.

Findings

Satisfying psychometric quality and prognostic validity of almost all measures was found. Especially TIHK, ICSI, and FLCS score well for assessing training needs whereas the results for SIB were problematic.

Research limitations/implications

The study observed student participants of the same culture. Replication studies should examine large samples of different cultural backgrounds and manager populations.

Practical implications

Human resource managers may benefit from gaining knowledge about which measures to use for identifying employee's weaknesses in intercultural competence in order to create tailor‐made training interventions.

Originality/value

The study is the first providing information about the psychometric quality, including predictive power, of six measures, that assess intercultural skills to detect intercultural training needs.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Azam Othman and Norbaiduri Ruslan

This paper aims to present the qualitative findings on students’ and teachers’ experiences in communicating and interacting with students and teachers from different…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the qualitative findings on students’ and teachers’ experiences in communicating and interacting with students and teachers from different ethnic backgrounds in the Malaysian vision schools initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face interviews were conducted involving 15 informants comprising of three headteachers, three teachers and nine students. The interviews centred on the informants’ experiences and views living and experiencing the reality of the vision schools which is comprising three major races; Malays, Chinese and Indians; which is represented by the three school types which are a national school, Chinese vernacular and Indian vernacular schools.

Findings

The interview data revealed that the intercultural communication in the vision schools had triggered intercultural understanding and awareness of cultural diversity in the schools. However, the interview data with experienced teachers showed some drawbacks of the intercultural dynamics at the school complex. Among the weaknesses were the absence of structured and formal training on intercultural and multicultural education, lack of trust and poor social skills which may have hindered effective intercultural communication from taking place.

Originality/value

This study presents the informants’ experiences and views on the reality of intercultural interaction among students and teachers in the context of the Malaysian vision school initiative.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Andrea Graf

Training designs are critical to the success of intercultural training programmes. A common typology for classifying intercultural training designs distinguishes among the…

Abstract

Training designs are critical to the success of intercultural training programmes. A common typology for classifying intercultural training designs distinguishes among the following dimensions: experiential discovery versus didactic expository and culture‐specific versus culture‐general training. The purpose of this paper is to assess different intercultural training designs referring to this typology. First, a concept of intercultural competence is developed. Based on this concept experiential training designs are favoured as they allow to train the cognitive, affective and behavioural component of intercultural competencies. In the second part of the paper an empirical study in the USA and Germany is conducted in order to assess whether the degree of intercultural competencies differs between the two nations. As no considerable differences can be identified the benefit of culture‐general training is discussed. Significant skills to be focused on in intercultural training are described and specific measures for pre‐assessment devices in intercultural training are presented.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Tien‐Chen Chien and Gary N. McLean

This study aims to explore the intercultural training needs for US business expatriates on assignment in Taiwan. The study assesses Taiwan culture‐specific training needs…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the intercultural training needs for US business expatriates on assignment in Taiwan. The study assesses Taiwan culture‐specific training needs of US expatriates from the perspectives of both US expatriates and their Taiwanese colleagues and compares the perceived importance of these intercultural training needs between these two groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the survey method to assess the opinions of US business expatriates as well as their Taiwanese colleagues. A questionnaire was developed for the study. A total of 26 items were identified as knowledge and skills needed for US business expatriates in Taiwan. The items all fall within six categories: knowledge of the nation, relationship building, interpersonal communication, business protocol, legal issues, and living in Taiwan.

Findings

Data collected from 78 US respondents and 78 Taiwanese respondents were analyzed using matched pairs t‐tests. Between‐group differences for the overall 26 items and each category were examined. Results indicate that there was a significant difference between the US and Taiwanese respondents in the perceived importance of the overall items.

Originality/value

Although there has been an abundance of literature on intercultural training, rarely has research been done on Taiwan cultural‐specific training. A study in this area can help human resource practitioners in developing expatriate training programs. Research results can contribute to the knowledge base of expatriate training and development, as well as the development of theories in this area.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Dirk Holtbrügge, Katrin Schillo, Helen Rogers and Carina Friedmann

The purpose of this study is to investigate the current and potential use of virtual teams in the Indian context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the current and potential use of virtual teams in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of virtual styles and strategies was assessed through a series of questionnaires, focusing on managerial aspects. The sample consisted of companies and individuals from Europe, who work on virtual assignments. The results were analysed, paying particular attention to the actual usage and potential future usage of virtual assignments.

Findings

It was found that a disparity between the actual and the potential use of virtual delegates exists. Furthermore, the increasing use of virtual delegates requires tailored intercultural training, which meets the specific demands of these delegates and the requirements of virtual teamwork. The paper goes on to discuss how traditional training can be adapted for the training of virtual assignees.

Originality/value

The findings have implications for both academics and practitioners, as they indicate that there is significant potential for further growth in the use of virtual assignments. In particular, the paper highlights the need for specific, dedicated training in virtual assignments, as this has a substantial impact on their success.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Wolfgang Messner

Most intercultural frameworks assess intercultural competencies, but global businesses lack instruments to support the feedback loop, that is help project managers answer…

Abstract

Purpose

Most intercultural frameworks assess intercultural competencies, but global businesses lack instruments to support the feedback loop, that is help project managers answer the question if an effective global team has been formed. The purpose of this paper is to develop and assess a new indicator for measuring the actual effectiveness of intercultural communication and collaboration at the individual and team level, the Mysore InterCultural Effectiveness (MICE) indicator.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a needs analysis in global businesses, international projects, and review of existing literature, a low-touch self-report indicator was developed. A test run in several international companies with live data obtained from 154 employees helped to validate the indicator using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The MICE indicator is based on two scales: first, the effectiveness in interacting and collaborating with foreign counterparts by providing an answer to the question “how I think I am with them;” and second, the satisfaction with appropriateness of communication received from foreign interlocutors and the outcome of the collaboration by answering the question “how I think they are with me.”

Originality/value

Empirical results indicate that the two scale/six factor model provides a good fit to the data. Using the MICE Indicator, it is now possible for project managers to effectively address shortcomings of intercultural communication skills in their international teams with the right type of intercultural training.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Tien‐Chen Chien

This study aims to focus on intercultural training for Taiwanese expatriates and assess the gap between intercultural training needs perceived by Taiwanese expatriates and

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on intercultural training for Taiwanese expatriates and assess the gap between intercultural training needs perceived by Taiwanese expatriates and the training provided by their companies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed both Taiwanese expatriates and HR managers of their companies. It developed a questionnaire based on the research of Black and Mendenhall to assess contents and methods of intercultural training. There were 16 questions for assessing intercultural training and they were divided into two categories: symbolic learning and participatory learning.

Findings

It is found that the needs of intercultural training perceived by expatriates are generally higher than the training provided by their companies. In the categories of symbolic and participatory learning, findings are consistent with the overall items. Results indicate that the perceived intercultural training needs of both categories are significantly higher than the training provided by their companies. Items of participatory learning are rated higher than those of symbolic learning by both groups.

Originality/value

Coping with the increasing competition in the international arena, Taiwanese business people are in need of being able to work effectively with people from a diversity of countries and cultures. It is necessary to study issues related to intercultural training for business expatriates. Findings in this area can be helpful for human resource practitioners in developing training programs for their business expatriates.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2012

Sharon Glazer, Małgorzata W. Kożusznik and Irina A. Shargo

Global virtual teams (GVTs), also known as transnational or distributed teams, are increasingly common as organizations strive to maintain a global presence, find top and…

Abstract

Global virtual teams (GVTs), also known as transnational or distributed teams, are increasingly common as organizations strive to maintain a global presence, find top and diverse talent, and cope with economic constraints. Despite increasing adoption of GVTs, there is a dearth of research addressing whether GVTs are an effective coping strategy for dealing with the world economic crisis and if there are unintended negative consequences on employee well-being as a result of their use. Thus, a focal question guiding the development of this chapter is whether or not GVTs are a sustainable solution for organizations? In this chapter we present a generic framework depicting the cycle by which macroeconomic demands impose changes on organization's structures, which trickle down to the level of the individual who has to cope with the demands the new structure has imposed. We discuss GVTs as an intervention (or cure) for organizations’ dealing with the current world economic crisis and how this organizational intervention inevitably becomes the context (or cause) for the kinds of stressors or demands employees face.

Details

The Role of the Economic Crisis on Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-005-5

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000