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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Le Cong Thuan

The purposes of this paper are first to resolve the inconsistent relationship between leader intellectual stimulation and follower creativity by investigating a promising…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are first to resolve the inconsistent relationship between leader intellectual stimulation and follower creativity by investigating a promising moderator and then to examine the role of follower creative ability and job autonomy as mediating mechanisms linking leader intellectual stimulation with follower creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged study was undertaken to gather data from employees working in the information technology sector in Vietnam (N = 415). This study used structural equation modeling (SEM) to analyze the gathered data.

Findings

This study found a positive direct relationship between leader intellectual stimulation and follower creative performance. Moreover, the follower proactive personality moderated this direct relationship. Furthermore, the results illustrated that follower creative ability and job autonomy partially mediated the positive effect of leader intellectual stimulation on follower creativity.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to investigate the moderating role of follower proactive personality in resolving the inconsistent relationship between leader intellectual stimulation and follower creativity. Moreover, with using follower creative ability and job autonomy as mediating mechanisms, this study provides evidence that leader behaviors have a partially indirect association with follower creativity through follower abilities and work characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Paul Constantin Endrejat

This study, first, examines whether a low culture person–organization (P-O) fit reduces job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Second, the author…

Abstract

Purpose

This study, first, examines whether a low culture person–organization (P-O) fit reduces job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Second, the author investigates how an organization's current innovation culture affects employees' attitudes and behaviors. Third, the author focuses on the interplay between leadership and organizational culture by testing whether supervisors' intellectual stimulation can mitigate the negative effects of a low innovation culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via online questionnaires from 135 employees. Using the organizational culture assessment inventory, employees described their current and their preferred organizational culture and rated their supervisors' behavior.

Findings

Current-preferred culture discrepancies and a low innovation culture were associated with lower job satisfaction. The negative effect of a low innovation culture on employees' satisfaction was moderated by supervisors' intellectual stimulation (i.e. employees working in a low innovation culture are more satisfied when they have a stimulating supervisor). If employees' preference regarding the desired culture differed from those of their colleagues, they reported less OCB. Intellectual stimulation exacerbated this effect.

Research limitations/implications

The author relied on self-reported cross-sectional data.

Practical implications

Actions are needed to ensure that the current culture and the preferred culture align and that employees agree on how the organizational culture should develop. Unless followers prefer different cultures than their colleagues, supervisors should show intellectual stimulation, especially in a culture whose norms do not support innovation.

Originality/value

The author emphasizes the positive consequences of a culture P-O fit and contributes to the much needed knowledge regarding the interplay between organizational culture and leadership behaviors on employees' attitudes and behaviors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Alexander Madsen Sandvik, Richard Croucher, Bjarne Espedal and Marcus Selart

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the precise role of intrinsic motivation and autonomy in relation to intellectual stimulation in creating a creative climate in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the precise role of intrinsic motivation and autonomy in relation to intellectual stimulation in creating a creative climate in a professional services firm. The intention is to discover whether theories that stress the primacy of the need for intrinsic motivation and autonomy over other managerial goals such as monitoring find support.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose and test a model for the relationship of interest. The theoretical model is tested through analysis of multilevel data gathered across in two iterations over two years from 177 employees and 64 teams in one company.

Findings

The authors find that intrinsic motivation and autonomy mediate the relationship between intellectual stimulation and creative climate. Autonomy exercises a stronger mediating effect than intrinsic motivation.

Research limitations/implications

The single company research context’s specificity; causal relationships between variables cannot be empirically investigated; the verified research model cannot claim to represent how the organization actually functions, for which qualitative work is required.

Practical implications

Theories stressing the primacy of employee autonomy are supported over those stressing a need for management to monitor and control autonomy-seeking employees.

Originality/value

This paper shows the vital mediating role of employee autonomy and to a lesser extent intrinsic motivation in a professional service firm context.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Sajjad Nawaz Khan, Siti Mariam Abdullah, Abdul Halim Busari, Muhammad Mubushar and Ikram Ullah Khan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of followership dimensions in the transformational leadership process by reversing the lens from the traditional…

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1663

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of followership dimensions in the transformational leadership process by reversing the lens from the traditional leader-centric perspective to emerging followership perspective and examine the role of trust as a mediating variable in the proposed relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative method data were collected through a questionnaire from 506 respondents of the telecom sector in Pakistan. The proposed hypotheses were tested using SPSS V.23 and PROCESS V.3.1.

Findings

The results indicate that followership dimensions (active engagement and independent critical thinking) positively affect all the four constructs of transformational leadership (idealized influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individualized consideration). Furthermore, trust in leadership partially mediates the direct relationship between followership dimensions and transformational leadership constructs.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted in a developing country context which limits its generalizability in other cultural backgrounds. Hence, further investigation could test the role of followership using different samples and methods.

Practical implications

Organizations need to pay more attention to followers’ development to produce better followership outcomes that will ultimately help establish strong relationships with transformational leaders and sustained positive outcomes.

Originality/value

This study empirically tests Shamir’s (2007) “reversing the lens” perspective and extends a distinct theoretical contribution to the social exchange theory that neither followers are passive participants, nor always on the receiving end of the relationship but they actively participate to establish a strong relationship with their leaders.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Leilei Bi, John Ehrich and Lisa C. Ehrich

This paper aims to explore the leadership values and practices of Confucius in the light of transformational leadership theory.

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3902

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the leadership values and practices of Confucius in the light of transformational leadership theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is literature based.

Findings

The paper discusses four key dimensions of transformational leadership theory: idealized influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and individualized consideration and uses these as a framework for exploring the values of and teaching approach used by Confucius. The key message of the paper is that educational leaders have much to learn from a Confucian leadership style that is fundamentally transformational in nature and encompasses moral/ethical, socially critical, and democratic dimensions.

Practical implications

The paper presents a case study of an English as a second language (ESL) school and identifies several practical suggestions for ESL leaders to consider if they are to follow the tenets of Confucius's teachings.

Originality/value

The paper is original as it links the values and practices of Confucius to transformational leadership theory and considers how this theory might look in practice for leaders within a contemporary ESL school context.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

Gerhard Fink and Maurice Yolles

A typology of basic affective and cognitive orientations is developed within a generic cultural socio-cognitive trait theory of a “plural affect agency” (the emotional…

Abstract

Purpose

A typology of basic affective and cognitive orientations is developed within a generic cultural socio-cognitive trait theory of a “plural affect agency” (the emotional organisation).

Design/methodology/approach

Affective personality is defined in terms of a set of affect traits. These are defined in terms of epistemically independent bipolar affect types, which in turn coalesce into a set of mindset types that can be related to the classical four temperaments.

Findings

Different affect types are supposed to differently regulate the three stages of emotion management. Affect types and cognitive types provide mutual contexts, and foster reciprocal affect and cognitive orientations.

Research limitations/implications

The theory provides guidance for analysis of cultural differentiation within social systems (societies/organisations), with reference to identification, elaboration and execution of “emotion knowledge” and “cognitive knowledge”.

Practical implications

Understanding interdependencies between cognition and emotion regulation is a prerequisite of managerial intelligence and strategic cultural intelligence, which is in demand for interaction and integration processes across social systems.

Originality/value

From the framework model linking emotion expression and emotion regulation with cognition analysis, a typology arises allowing ex-ante expectation of typical patterns of behaviour.

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Jeevan Jyoti and Manisha Dev

This research aims to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and employee creativity. In addition, we intend to study the moderating role played by…

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3567

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and employee creativity. In addition, we intend to study the moderating role played by learning orientation in the relationship between transformational leadership and employee creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data have been collected from employees working at the Airtel and Aircel call centers of J&K (India). A two-step approach to structural equation modeling (SEM) was applied. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to assess the proposed measurement model fit and construct validity. The structural model was generated to test the significance of the theoretical relationships.

Findings

The results revealed that there is a positive relationship between transformational leadership and employee creativity, and it is being moderated by learning orientation.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study expands our knowledge about the role of learning orientation between transformational leadership and employee creativity, the prospects for further research are still present. The cross-sectional design of study might not have been able to extract the true essence of the cause-and-effect relationship between transformational leadership and employee creativity.

Practical implications

Transformational leaders promote followers’ creativity, so the management may find it valuable to invest in transformational leadership training for supervisors and team leaders, or use personality testing to screen for high-caliber candidates, who have high potential of becoming a transformational leader. The characteristics of a transformational leader, when coupled with the learning orientation of employees, yield positive results in the form of employee creativity, which managers can use to generate sustainable competitive advantages for their organizations.

Originality/value

This paper is original, as it contributes to existing theory by establishing the moderating role played by learning orientation in between transformational leadership and employee creativity. The moderation has been proved via SEM with the help of latent constructs, which is seldom done.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Iain L. Densten

This paper examines the leadership of police officers in the top levels or ranks of an Australian police organization. The sample consisted of 480 senior police who…

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4321

Abstract

This paper examines the leadership of police officers in the top levels or ranks of an Australian police organization. The sample consisted of 480 senior police who recorded the frequency of leadership behaviors of the person they directly report to via the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Multi‐regression was used to identify predictors of the leadership outcomes of leader effectiveness and extra effort. The study found that each rank of senior officers had unique sets of leadership behaviors that influence the perception of leader effectiveness and motivation to exert extra effort. The Stratified System Theory was used to explore why each rank had unique combinations of predictors. Finally, the paper discusses the multilevel issues of leadership and the importance of considering rank in relation to leadership at the senior levels of police organizations.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Carolin Abrell-Vogel and Jens Rowold

Followers’ affective commitment to change has been found to constitute a strong predictor of the success of change initiatives in organizations. Several studies have yet…

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10222

Abstract

Purpose

Followers’ affective commitment to change has been found to constitute a strong predictor of the success of change initiatives in organizations. Several studies have yet shown positive effects of transformational leadership on followers’ commitment to change. However, up to date there is no study examining the direct effects of different transformational leadership behaviors on followers’ commitment to change and the moderating impact of leaders’ commitment to change on these relationships. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional, multilevel design based on multisource date from 38 teams from different organizations with a total of 177 participating team members. Data of leaders’ and followers’ commitment to change as well as ratings of transformational leadership behavior were captured applying a quantitative approach.

Findings

Results show a significant positive effect of the transformational leadership behavior “individual support” on followers’ affective commitment toward change. Moreover, the transformational leadership behavior “providing an appropriate model” was shown as only positively contributing to followers’ commitment to change when leaders’ own commitment toward change was high.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the multilevel and multisource data, the sample is relatively small which limits the external validity of findings. Also, future studies should invest in longitudinal replication of relationships. Research on leaders’ and followers’ commitment to change should continue to develop more complete models of interacting influence factors.

Practical implications

For team leaders and organizations, results underline the importance of individual support of team members. Thus, leaders need to be enabled to invest individual leadership in the long run. Also, leaders need to become aware of their own commitment toward the change and, going beyond, need to develop a positive bond to the change if they want to be able to act as successful role models.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to existing literature by offering a more detailed insight for researchers and practitioners into the effectiveness of transformational leadership in change by exploring the impact of different transformational leadership behaviors effecting followers’ commitment to change. Moreover, it provides important knowledge about the relevance of leaders’ own commitment to change as a moderator of effective leadership in change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Tim Haslett, John Barton, John Stephens, Liz Schell and Jane Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergent nature of leadership in a university‐based learning network of mature‐aged practitioner‐scholars.

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1002

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergent nature of leadership in a university‐based learning network of mature‐aged practitioner‐scholars.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on previously published work, interviews, and current research.

Findings

The paper finds that once initial structures have been established, the leadership role falls to different members depending on the needs of the group. Intellectual leadership becomes important in this setting.

Research limitations/implications

The study is drawn from a single case although supported by research done in a similar group in the UK. Research indicates that cohorts and support networks increase success rates in PhD completions. This paper outlines one example of the structures and processes of a successful one.

Practical implications

There is significant leverage for universities in developing the network structures and process, beyond the simple supervisor/student relationship that support doctoral students. It focuses on the contribution a learning network can make to mature‐aged part‐time students.

Originality/value

This paper develops the current literature on supervision of doctoral students.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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