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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Maria Roth, Imola Antal, Ágnes Dávid-Kacsó and Éva László

Since the reforms started in the Romanian child protection, and in spite of adopting children’s rights, and investing in the professionalization of the child protection…

Abstract

Since the reforms started in the Romanian child protection, and in spite of adopting children’s rights, and investing in the professionalization of the child protection staff, research has indicated that children continue to suffer violence in care settings.

This chapter contributes to the literature that documents children’s rights violations in Romanian residential care, before and after the political shift in 1989, including the period after the accession to the EU, by presenting and discussing interview data of 48 adults who spent parts of their childhoods in child protection settings.

The conceptual framework of this analysis is based on the human rights perspective and the transitional justice. The main body of the article presents the testimonials of adults who grew up in institutional care in Romania, as collected in the framework of the SASCA project, funded by the European Union. 1

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Human Rights for Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-047-0

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Bridget Penhale

Issues and developments that have occurred in relation to elder abuse, specifically concerning the domestic setting, will be briefly explored. Over the last 15 years…

Abstract

Issues and developments that have occurred in relation to elder abuse, specifically concerning the domestic setting, will be briefly explored. Over the last 15 years, there has been increasing global recognition of abuse and neglect of older people who might be at risk of such forms of harm, as a social problem needing attention. The role of the media and media representations of elder abuse are clearly of relevance here and are the main focus of this chapter.

Around 500,000 older people are believed to be abused at any one time in the United Kingdom, with most victims of elder abuse being older women with a chronic illness or disability, according to statistics provided by the government information service (NHS Digital, 2019). Most of the abuse recorded relates to domestic settings within communities.

Gender-based violence and abuse amongst older women may be overlooked by health and social care providers. For older women, their gender seems to be forgotten or becomes hidden. Media representation of abuse against older people, particularly older women, does not assist this situation.

Against the backdrop of the global ageing population, it is fundamental that the particular experiences, needs and rights of older people are adequately understood, and that health and care professionals respond appropriately. This chapter explores these issues, in particular the role of the digital media and representations of elder abuse in familial settings and its impact on victims, potential victims, perpetrators, health and social care service providers and the general public.

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Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Jonathan Parker

Although in recent years elder abuse has attracted considerable social and professional attention, it is still in the opinion of many a taboo subject. In this paper the…

Abstract

Although in recent years elder abuse has attracted considerable social and professional attention, it is still in the opinion of many a taboo subject. In this paper the author examines why this is the case and considers what has been learnt. In doing so he considers causation and predisposing factors and the modes of intervention available

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Ana Paula Gil and Manuel Luis Capelas

Reciprocal abuse inside care practices remain under-studied due to their invisibility and further research is required. The purpose of this paper is to explore different…

Abstract

Purpose

Reciprocal abuse inside care practices remain under-studied due to their invisibility and further research is required. The purpose of this paper is to explore different levels of conflicts inside organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a self-administered questionnaire filled out by care workers (n = 150), in 16 Portuguese care homes.

Findings

Results indicated that, overall, 54.7% of care workers had observed abuse, in their daily practice, in the preceding 12 months: 48.7% psychological; 36.0% neglectful care practices; 14.0% physical and 3.3% financial abuse. The figures decreased significantly as regards abuse committed themselves, with 16.7% of those admitting to having committed at least one of these behaviours. The highest figures were also recorded for psychological abuse (13.3%) and neglect (6.7%). However, there is a statistically significant relationship between abuse committed by care workers and abuse committed by residents. Overall, 52.0% of care workers reported having been the target of at least one such behaviour by residents.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has its limitations as the sample consisted of only 16 nursing homes (12 not-for-profit and 4 for-profit nursing homes). The fact that only 4 of the 16 LTC homes were for-profit is a potential limitation both in general and in particular because research has shown that lower quality of care and elder abuse and neglect are more common in for-profit nursing homes at least in Portugal. The results were also based on self-reported measures.

Practical implications

A reactive behaviour, the risk of retaliation, after a complaint, the difficulty in dealing with dementia and the residents' aggressive behaviour, an absence of a training and support policy in an environment where difficult working conditions prevail, are factors enhancing a reciprocal process of abuse. The analysis followed by a discussion of potential implications to prevent institutional elder abuse and neglect, based on communication and social recognition, including better working conditions and training, and a cooperative work environment.

Social implications

Conflict is much more than reducing an interpersonal relationship problem between residents and staff (care workers, professional staff, managers) and extending to the whole organisation. Therefore, there are still uncertainties on how organisations, staff and residents interact between themselves, and affect care practises.

Originality/value

Reciprocal abuse in nursing homes is an important area of research and this paper enabled a discussion of potential implications concerning the quality of care, which required the identification of levels of conflict, in an organisational system, including interactions, the context where care is provided, difficult working conditions, lack of training and levels of support. All these factors are important when considering elder abuse and neglect and this calls for special attention by policymakers and researchers.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Jane Garner

This paper considers the doctor's role in unravelling the causes of abuse of older people. The author argues that doctors have a responsibility to understand and address…

Abstract

This paper considers the doctor's role in unravelling the causes of abuse of older people. The author argues that doctors have a responsibility to understand and address the ageism, ignorance and unthinking which lies is at the root of most institutional abuse.

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Wenche Malmedal and Christiana Anyan

The aim of this study was to explore how Ghanaian staff in nursing homes and hospitals perceive abuse and neglect of older adults as well as to explore the nature and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to explore how Ghanaian staff in nursing homes and hospitals perceive abuse and neglect of older adults as well as to explore the nature and scope of abuse and neglect of older adults as it exists in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study used a qualitative research methodology that sets out to explore staff’s perception of elder abuse in nursing homes and hospitals in Ghana. Five nursing assistants and two caregivers were interviewed in two nursing homes and four nurses were interviewed in one hospital. A semi-structured interview guide was used for data collection.

Findings

The findings showed that elder abuse occurs in both hospitals and nursing homes, which might be attributed to different personal, situational and institutional characteristics as well as cultural and traditional value systems. Various factors at the level of interpersonal relationships contributed to elder abuse. Situational characteristics such as aggressive exchanges between residents and health workers and institutional characteristics such as limited facilities and resources to care for residents are all factors that were implicated in elder abuse. Finally, culture and traditional views, beliefs system and socioeconomic factors seem to be implicated in elder abuse and neglect.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that explores elder abuse and neglect in Ghanaian nursing homes and hospitals.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2014

Paula Hyde, Diane Burns, Anne Killett, Andrea Kenkmann, Fiona Poland and Richard Gray

The purpose of this paper is to propose five organisational factors associated with abuse, neglect and/or loss of dignity of older people resident in care homes. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose five organisational factors associated with abuse, neglect and/or loss of dignity of older people resident in care homes. It derives from one set of findings from the ResPECT Study of Organisational Dynamics of Elder Care commissioned by Comic Relief and Department of Health through the Prevention of Abuse and Neglect In the Care of Older Adults programme.

Design/methodology/approach

A knowledge synthesis method was selected to identify organisational aspects of elder mistreatment in residential care settings. The method was selected for its suitability in examining ill-defined and contested concepts such as; elder mistreatment – where the available evidence is dispersed and produced in varied forms. A rapid review comprising a search of three academic databases and a detailed examination of selected investigation reports into institutional mistreatment was followed by panel meetings with subject matter experts to complete the knowledge synthesis.

Findings

This paper identifies and elaborates five organisational factors associated with elder mistreatment; infrastructure, management and procedures, staffing, resident population characteristics and culture. It also indicates macro-structural factors affecting care quality.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to elaborate the influence of these organisational factors on mistreatment and to understand any interactions.

Practical implications

As an adjunct to personal factors, the knowledge synthesis indicates common organisational factors contributing to institutional abuse. This suggests that care quality is produced systemically and that it can collapse as a result of seemingly minor and unrelated organisational changes.

Social implications

Care home safety and quality is an ongoing concern, with popular analysis frequently stopping at the point of describing individual errant behaviour. However, as “problem” organisations are closed down, “problem” organisational factors continue to recur elsewhere.

Originality/value

The paper identifies and elaborates organisational aspects of elder mistreatment in residential care settings. The findings are original, valuable and grounded in relevant experience by the method of analysis and synthesis of the findings from inquiry reports as well as research and the contribution to the development of findings by those central to the issue, residents, relatives and care providers.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Paul Cambridge, Jim Mansell, Julie Beadle‐Brown, Alisoun Milne and Beckie Whelton

The purpose of this paper is to report the key findings from a study of adult protection referrals collected by two English local authorities during 1998‐2005.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the key findings from a study of adult protection referrals collected by two English local authorities during 1998‐2005.

Design/methodology/approach

Referrals were analysed for patterns relating to risk with client level data supplemented by information from the local authority databases and from the Care Quality Commission. The analysis also examined associations between adult protection processes and outcomes and looked at how adult protection monitoring data could be improved to better inform safeguarding management and practice at local and national level.

Findings

Sexual abuse was most frequently reported for people with intellectual disabilities, who were also at higher risk of abuse when living out of area. Older people were most at risk of financial abuse in community settings and of neglect in residential care.

Originality/value

The study identifies patterns of risk in the abuse of older people and those with intellectual disabilities and informs preventive interventions. It also indicates priorities for improving the quality and comparability of adult protection monitoring data.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Sally Robinson and Lesley Chenoweth

A schema for more clearly understanding the emotional and psychological abuse and neglect of people with intellectual disability was developed to support a narrative study…

Abstract

Purpose

A schema for more clearly understanding the emotional and psychological abuse and neglect of people with intellectual disability was developed to support a narrative study with people with intellectual disability, families and other supporters about the lived experience of this maltreatment in disability accommodation services in Australia. This paper aims to describe the underpinning review of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect and the evolving new framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of existing understandings of this form of abuse in research and policy was conducted, and a framework developed and tested for “trustworthiness” with participants in the research.

Findings

A framework of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect is presented. It centres on the misuse of power and control, details behaviours and interactions which can occur when it is inflicted, and is tested against the experiences of people who have experienced this sort of abuse and neglect.

Research limitations/implications

This is an evolving framework, applied through one study only. Further application and research is needed to test the robustness of the framework.

Originality/value

A more complex construction of emotional and psychological abuse and neglect may inform the development of service policy and support education for people with disability, families, and workers.

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2022

Karl Mason, Anusree Biswas Sasidharan, Adi Cooper, Katy Shorten and Jeanette Sutton

Discriminatory abuse has been a distinct category of abuse in safeguarding adults policy since 2000, but it is rarely used in practice, according to recent official…

Abstract

Purpose

Discriminatory abuse has been a distinct category of abuse in safeguarding adults policy since 2000, but it is rarely used in practice, according to recent official statistics. As part of a larger project, the authors undertook a literature review to clarify the concept, explore reasons for low reporting and consider recommendations for practice. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of this literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

This literature review comprises 35 sources, which were identified using three academic databases, reference harvesting and sector-specific websites. Findings were developed through thematic analysis of the data.

Findings

The literature review demonstrates that definitions of discriminatory abuse stretch from an interpersonal emphasis in policy documents to a more structural approach. There are open questions about the status of discriminatory abuse as a category of abuse due to the complicated interface between discriminatory motivations and the abusive acts through which they are experienced. A range of factors can obscure its identification, particularly the hidden, stigmatised and normalised nature of discriminatory abuse. Some recommendations for practice are identified, but more work is needed to develop the practice vocabulary and required skills.

Originality/value

This study brings together existing research on discriminatory abuse to argue that it is time to revive this understanding of abuse and develop safeguarding practice with adults who have protected characteristics.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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