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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Ricardo Madureira

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal…

Abstract

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal mechanisms of coordination in multinational corporations. The main questions addressed include the following. (1) What factors influence the occurrence of personal contacts of foreign subsidiary managers in industrial multinational corporations? (2) How such personal contacts enable coordination in industrial markets and within multinational firms? The theoretical context of the paper is based on: (1) the interaction approach to industrial markets, (2) the network approach to industrial markets, and (3) the process approach to multinational management. The unit of analysis is the foreign subsidiary manager as the focal actor of a contact network. The paper is empirically focused on Portuguese sales subsidiaries of Finnish multinational corporations, which are managed by either a parent country national (Finnish), a host country national (Portuguese) or a third country national. The paper suggests eight scenarios of individual dependence and uncertainty, which are determined by individual, organizational, and/or market factors. Such scenarios are, in turn, thought to require personal contacts with specific functions. The paper suggests eight interpersonal roles of foreign subsidiary managers, by which the functions of their personal contacts enable inter-firm coordination in industrial markets. In addition, the paper suggests eight propositions on how the functions of their personal contacts enable centralization, formalization, socialization and horizontal communication in multinational corporations.

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Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2009

Monique Ziebro and Gregory Northcraft

In today's knowledge-based economy, the ability to produce highly novel and practical ideas is critical to an organization's survival. This paper draws upon social…

Abstract

In today's knowledge-based economy, the ability to produce highly novel and practical ideas is critical to an organization's survival. This paper draws upon social perspectives of creativity (Perry-Smith & Shalley, 2003) and the vital role of recombinant information in creative development (Barron & Harrington, 1981; Hargadon, 2003) to explore information exchange probabilities; exchanges among group members who are deep-level similar fosters incremental creative potential while information exchanges among group members who are deep-level dissimilar fosters radical creative potential. The dynamics of attraction suggest group members are most likely to interact with people who are least likely to facilitate radical creativity. Using a computer simulation we examine how proximity may be used to facilitate information exchanges among deep-level diverse group members to increase the potential for radical creativity. Results suggest the use of proximity to create strong ties among deep-level dissimilar group members may facilitate radical creativity in groups.

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Creativity in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-583-3

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Le Cong Thuan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of task-efficacy and information exchange in linking the relationship between developmental feedback and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of task-efficacy and information exchange in linking the relationship between developmental feedback and employee creativity. In addition, this current paper tests the moderating role of innovative climate in reinforcing the effects of task-efficacy and information exchange on employee creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

This current research used a time-lagged questionnaire survey to reduce the potential problem of common method variance. The sample size of this study was 305 employees from information technology companies in southern Vietnam. This research undertook a hierarchical regression analysis to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results found that task-efficacy and information exchange fully meditated the relationship between developmental feedback and employee creativity. Furthermore, innovative climate positively moderated the effects of task-efficacy and information exchange on employees’ creative performance.

Originality/value

This current paper is one of the first studies to examine task-efficacy as a motivational mechanism and information exchange as a cognitive mechanism for understanding the relationship between developmental feedback and employee creativity. This paper is also one of the first attempts to investigate whether innovative climate reinforces the effects of task-efficacy and information exchange on employee creativity.

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International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Li Chen, Fengxia Zhu and Murali Mantrala

This paper aims to systematically investigate the direct and indirect effects of four types of support – peer instrumental support, peer emotional support, platform…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to systematically investigate the direct and indirect effects of four types of support – peer instrumental support, peer emotional support, platform business support and platform communication support – on seller trade volume in social commerce. It also aims to uncover the path of support-to-sales of the seller from a platform perspective and provides a more complete picture of the social commerce phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses multi-source data including primary survey data and secondary data on trade volume to test the hypotheses. PROCESS mediation model is used to analyze the multi-source data set.

Findings

This study finds that the positive effects of peer instrumental support, platform business support and platform communication support on seller trade volume are fully mediated by seller collaborative information exchange. Also, peer emotional support has a significant negative effect on seller trade volume and collaborative information exchange can serve as a buffer to mitigate the negative effect.

Research limitations/implications

The authors provide new insights into what types of support are or are not conducive to improving transaction volume of individual sellers and highlight the mediating role of seller information exchange in this value generation process in social commerce. These findings advance current knowledge of how seller interactions increase value in social commerce. The chosen research setting may limit the generalizability of the findings of this study.

Practical implications

This paper offers valuable implications for social commerce platforms on how to better serve their sellers to achieve high growth. Specifically, the findings suggest that platforms should encourage instrumental support and information exchange among peer sellers. In addition, platforms should expand seller support from a single-focus on sellers’ business to a dual-focus on both sellers’ business and socialization in social commerce.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to study how sellers can better derive value from the social interactions and how social commerce platforms can effectively influence transactions, support sales and serve as a selling platform.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Derek Adetokunbo Obadina

This paper aims to examine the Nigeria’s approach for tackling tax evasion, the limitations of double tax conventions for that purpose, the benefits of multilateral…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the Nigeria’s approach for tackling tax evasion, the limitations of double tax conventions for that purpose, the benefits of multilateral instruments/standards for automatic exchange of tax information and Nigeria’s ability to participate in such arrangements.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a library-based research, deploying content analysis with respect to books, law reports, law journals and newspapers.

Findings

Nigeria has taken significant steps to deal with domestic tax evasion by tightening anti-money laundering legislation, principally by making tax evasion a predicate offence and by imposing relating reporting obligations on financial institutions and a wide range of designated non financial institutions (DNFI's), but cross-border tax evasion remains a big problem owing to a limited network of double tax conventions (DTCs) and inherent limitations of the machinery in limiting exchange of information to distinct requests. Nigeria’s ability to benefit from new international standards providing for automatic exchange is compromised by the absence of robust rules with respect to taxpayer confidentiality and data protection.

Research limitations/implications

Because the research focused on Nigeria, the findings of the study might not be applicable to other jurisdictions.

Originality/value

Given the devastating effects of tax evasion on development in Nigeria and the priority accorded to the eradication of the problem in the sustainable development goals, this paper meets a need to determine the extent of sufficiency of Nigeria’s legal and regulatory framework in enabling the country to tackle tax evasion.

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Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Kathleen M. O'Connor

Negotiators gain valuable insight into the other party's true interests and reach mutually beneficial agreements by discussing their priorities and preferences among…

Abstract

Negotiators gain valuable insight into the other party's true interests and reach mutually beneficial agreements by discussing their priorities and preferences among issues. This study investigated how motives are related to information exchange, and how this, in turn, affects perceptual accuracy and outcomes. The analyses revealed that cooperatively‐motivated dyads followed an information exchange route to settlement, whereas individualistic dyads shared little information. Moreover, while information exchange was related to perceptual accuracy for cooperative dyads, this was not the case for individualistic negotiators. The effectiveness of this settlement route varied when different kinds of issues—integrative and common‐value (compatible) issues—were considered While integrative issues were likely to be settled through information exchange, common‐value issue outcomes were determined in large part by negotiators' first offers. These findings suggest that the scope of the information‐accuracy hypothesis should be modified to account for differences among motives and issues.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Nereu F. Kock, Robert J. McQueen and James L. Corner

Suggests that a number of assumptions in the past have been made about how business process improvement, re‐engineering and organizational learning should take place in…

Abstract

Suggests that a number of assumptions in the past have been made about how business process improvement, re‐engineering and organizational learning should take place in organizations. Points out that, although a number of these assumptions have been framed on theoretical models, few have been based on the empirical analysis of the nature of actual business processes. Tries to fill this gap with an analysis of data, information and knowledge exchanges in 22 business processes from three organizations. Points to a number of characteristics that appear to be contradictory to some current organizational practices, and that can be helpful to inform future developments in the fields of business process improvement, re‐engineering and organizational learning. Two relevant characteristics are a much higher proportion of data over material exchanges in business processes, and a higher proportion of knowledge exchanges in improvement over core and support processes.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Suman Niranjan, Stephen R. Spulick and Katrina Savitskie

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an exploratory study that will assist supply chain firms in the development of partner satisfaction, flexibility, and supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an exploratory study that will assist supply chain firms in the development of partner satisfaction, flexibility, and supply chain performance. The authors examine how the interaction of information exchange, partner interaction, knowledge sharing and flexibility as mediated through partner satisfaction effectuates firm performance. The goal of this research is to answer the supply chain managers’ need to better understand where to invest their time and effort to get improved firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested with panel data from 105 experienced, US-based supply chain managers. Structural equation modeling using partial least squares approach was utilized to conduct the analysis.

Findings

The results provide crucial evidence that simple information exchange among supply chain partners does not result in improvements in firm performance or partner satisfaction, but, when mediated through the flexibility construct, it does. Further, the use of integration tools has a moderating effect on the relationship between flexibility and firm performance. The results suggest that working closely with supply chain partners helps ensure improved relationship satisfaction, and can reduce issues that can impact firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical research presented requires additional validation though larger sample data from supply chain managers.

Practical implications

This study stresses on the importance of managers using information exchange, partner interaction, and knowledge sharing as a means of improving their firm’s indirect influence on firm performance through flexibility and integration tools.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies in the supply chain literature that integrates flexibility as a mediator variable. Additionally, this study introduces the new construct of integration tools to the supply chain literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Katherine E. Kemp and William P. Smith

Information exchange is a significant factor in the achievement of integrative agreements in negotiation. However, it is not clear what factors govern information exchange

Abstract

Information exchange is a significant factor in the achievement of integrative agreements in negotiation. However, it is not clear what factors govern information exchange. While tutoring negotiators in information exchange has clearly been shown to be effective, the experiment reported here was concerned with less directive interventions. Negotiators were either (a) alerted to the possibility that the other party's issue priorities were not the same as their own—and hence the problem not fixed pie in nature—(Priority condition); or (b) made aware of the need to look at problems from another's perspective (Perspective condition). Interest was in how these interventions would effect negotiators' spontaneous exchange of potential outcome information, their understanding of the integrative nature of the problem, and their joint outcome from their negotiated agreement, as compared with a control condition. In addition, the role of negotiator firmness in the achievement of integrative agreements was examined. It was found that Priority negotiators engaged in more information exchange, tended to be more accurate in their understanding of the nature of the bargaining problem, and achieved higher joint profits in their agreements than did control negotiators. Pairs whose summed perspective‐taking ability was higher made agreements with higher joint profits than those with lower perspective‐taking ability. Negotiator firmness was higher for the Priority condition than for the control condition. It was concluded that (a) spontaneous exchange of outcome information does occur when negotiators are cued to doubt the fixed pie hypothesis about possible outcomes of negotiation; (b) this exchange is associated with higher joint profits, i.e., with more integrative bargaining; but (c) firmness as well as information exchange appears to play an important role in integrative bargaining; in addition, (d) perspective‐taking does seem to encourage integrative bargaining, but it is difficult to induce, and how it operates is unclear.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2019

Sandra Matarneh, Mark Danso-Amoako, Salam Al-Bizri, Mark Gaterell and Rana Matarneh

The purpose of this study is to address challenges in the current information exchange process between building information modelling (BIM) and facilities management (FM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to address challenges in the current information exchange process between building information modelling (BIM) and facilities management (FM) systems and to propose a workable solution. This study’s objective is to identify the information exchange requirements and to develop methods for seamless information flow between building information models and FM systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection and analysis was based on an extensive literature review of similar studies followed by a questionnaire survey with a total of 112 participants and 2 focus groups with a total of 12 participants to validate the conceptual framework. The outputs of the survey analysis formed the background of the proposed framework to streamline information exchange process between building information models and FM systems.

Findings

The study findings form a foundation for enabling the integration of various data sources including building information models. Such integrated platforms will enable automated information exchange between the various data sources and FM systems. The study also provides key information requirements sources to complement the existing construction operations building information exchange information and to support standardization for information exchange process.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is the identification of information exchange requirements and sources to enable seamless information flow between BIM and FM systems. The study findings will also lay the basis for research studies using the developed framework context to enable the identification of specific data outputs for FM systems inputs.

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