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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Sharon Warren, Patricia Black and Elizabeth Mills

The purpose of this paper is to describe the introduction of an online induction programme including an interactive webinar on a distance learning course and to present…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the introduction of an online induction programme including an interactive webinar on a distance learning course and to present student feedback on the programme. It focuses on lessons learnt and implications for others implementing similar induction programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-completion questionnaire was sent to all students enroled on the programme, including those who did not attend the webinar or participate in the online induction programme. This was followed up with a semi-structured interview. The analysis focused on the student experience of the induction programme.

Findings

Overall, students reported to be satisfied with the online programme. The webinar encouraged engagement with some elements of the online workshop and was felt to complement the other learning opportunities available online. The webinar was particularly valued for providing a “face” to the course, facilitating interactivity among tutors and students and helping the students to feel part of the University. Students also reported that the webinar had the advantage of allowing a social interaction between them.

Practical implications

A number of key changes related to multiple offerings of the webinar and the timing of activities in the online workshop were highlighted to encourage participation. Greater clarity on what is required in the induction and how long it would take would also encourage participation.

Originality/value

This case study is one of the few to evaluate the inclusion of webinar technology within an online induction programme and, therefore, has value in this context.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Rachel Shanks

Scotland's Teacher Induction Scheme, which covers new teachers in the state sector, was introduced in 2002, before which there was a 2-year probation period. This chapter…

Abstract

Scotland's Teacher Induction Scheme, which covers new teachers in the state sector, was introduced in 2002, before which there was a 2-year probation period. This chapter covers teacher probation prior to 2002; the components of the Teacher Induction Scheme; allocation of induction year teachers; the Standard for Full Registration; support and professional learning and tensions in the scheme, namely mentors' dual support and assessment roles, the vulnerable position of induction year teachers and the role of universities in teacher induction. While there have been some minor changes to the Teacher Induction Scheme and the Flexible Route (originally called the Alternative Route) to Registration, there has not been an official review or overhaul since their introduction in 2002. Therefore, this chapter concludes with suggestions on possible future developments.

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Jonas Sprogoe and Bente Elkjaer

Induction is the process of newcomers entering and becoming part of an organization. In one sense newcomers represent an opportunity for organizations to learn and change…

Abstract

Purpose

Induction is the process of newcomers entering and becoming part of an organization. In one sense newcomers represent an opportunity for organizations to learn and change, but in another sense newcomers are instigated into an existing institutional order. The purpose of this paper is to explore how induction of newcomers can be understood as both organizational renewal and the maintenance of status quo, and to develop ways of describing this in terms of learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is designed as a qualitative study of induction practices in two branches of a Danish retail bank and a Danish management consulting company. The data are based on 30 semi‐structured interviews and on some observations in the case companies. The data have subsequently been analyzed phenomenologically and thematically in light of a pragmatist understanding of learning.

Findings

The paper provides two main findings. The duality of induction, in terms of organizational renewal and the maintenance of status quo can be conceptualized and meaningfully discussed through the metaphors of organizational rhythm and generative dance. And if this ambiguous dimension of induction is recognized, organizational idiosyncrasies, ways of doing and taken‐for‐granted aspects can be thrown up for discussion and thus potentially change or stabilize organizational practice based on persons and institutional order.

Research limitations/implications

The paper adds to the growing academic debate of the complex nature of practice in general, and induction in particular. In addition, the paper has implications for practitioners involved in induction, as the paper highlights the need to rethink induction as both an opportunity to create organizational renewal and a way of maintaining status quo.

Originality/value

Seeing the duality of induction and exploring it through the metaphors of organizational rhythm and generative dancing is original and potentially enriching for researchers and practitioners.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Elena P. Antonacopoulou and Wolfgang H. Güttel

Socialization is one of the fundamental processes that define how collectivities emerge. Socialization underpins the social structures that shape not only how social…

Abstract

Purpose

Socialization is one of the fundamental processes that define how collectivities emerge. Socialization underpins the social structures that shape not only how social actors interact in community but also the boundaries of action and the rules of engagement. In the context of organizations, socialization is a process that significantly shapes organization in the way core practices shape how things are done and why they are done in particular ways. This emphasis on consistency within and between practices is seen to be greatly facilitated by specific practices like staff induction. The purpose of this paper is to review the current conceptual and empirical research on staff induction as a process of organizational socialization and outlines some of the areas for future research particularly if a social practice perspective is adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a systematic review of the relevant literature on organizational socialization and staff induction and outlines themes to which the debate can usefully be extended.

Findings

This paper focuses on how staff induction practices provide valuable insights about how social agents (especially newcomers) get socialized in organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a foundation for the various staff induction practices that other papers in this issue will be presenting. By outlining the current debate and insights from previous empirical research on staff induction, the objective is to extend the debate by outlining some new avenues for research that papers in the special issue both respond to and further explicate.

Originality/value

This paper explores staff induction and organizational socialization as a practice that can provide new insights into the dynamics of social interaction within organizations.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Jérôme Méric and Rémi Jardat

Induction and institutions may have followed the same tracks for a long period of time, but their interaction is scarcely analyzed. On the one hand, induction prepares…

Abstract

Purpose

Induction and institutions may have followed the same tracks for a long period of time, but their interaction is scarcely analyzed. On the one hand, induction prepares newcomers to work in an organization that is completely new to them. On the other hand, institutions apparently need induction processes to maintain themselves in the same time they renew their members. The purpose of the present paper is to analyze induction as a practice, and to show how this practice turns itself into an institution, in spite of the embeddedness of action scripts into rational schemes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces the case of a retail bank and a consulting company in France. Both have formalized induction systems, but they show enough differences to be considered as offering two complementary approaches of a same practice. The same method is applied to both fields. It consists of analyzing induction as an aggregate of ostensive (action scripts), performative (actions themselves) elements, and artefacts (material productions).

Findings

The successive steps of selections and integration of induction process appear as ways of testing the compatibility of newcomers with the immunity system of the organization. Moreover, throughout both case studies, the ostensive aspect of induction has remained stable for years, although markets and business models have changed a lot. Induction seems to be frozen as far as practicing (i.e. the implementation of action scripts) is concerned. The study of practising (i.e. the dialectic interaction of ostensive, performative elements, and artefacts) shows that constant and individually lead adaptive moves preserve the institutionalized practice without any shape of rigidity.

Originality/value

Stability vs change, uniformity vs diversity depends on the lens by which the paper it looks at practices. If it takes into consideration the ocean of actions that are performed day after day inside the firm, diversity and change appear. However, if it adopts a longer range look at what happens and correlate it to appropriate institutional factors, stability, and uniformity emerge from permanent change. That disqualifies both technocratic attempts to standardize performance from abstract patterns and naive designs of spontaneous emergence of “not embedded” behaviors.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Bob Dodds and Marjan Verest

Provides a practical case illustration of the development and implementation of Web‐based induction training in an international financial services company. In the context…

Abstract

Provides a practical case illustration of the development and implementation of Web‐based induction training in an international financial services company. In the context of continuing growth and change, helping new employees to swiftly familiarise and integrate into the company is seen as being critically important. Shows how the power and capabilities of the company intranet are applied to support the induction process. The design of the induction training is examined from the perspective of the Lancaster learning model. Describes how the development of interactive training demonstrator systems is helpful when presenting the proposed induction training process to operational staff in order to clarify operational needs. The practical benefits of this approach to induction training are summarised from the perspective of new employees and for human resource management.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Conrad Lashley and Warwick Best

The process whereby new recruits are brought into the firm is an important element of human resource management practice. If done well, it can help to retain the new…

Abstract

The process whereby new recruits are brought into the firm is an important element of human resource management practice. If done well, it can help to retain the new employee and reduce staff turnover. Shows that a cross‐section of firms in the sector now have some form of staff induction programme in place. In most cases, the induction programme is short‐lived and focused on job role and administrative procedures. The survey of these firms suggests that there is a need to embrace best practice from other sectors of the retailing industry, in particular, the recognition that well‐planned and structured induction can play an important role in bringing down staff turnover. However, induction is best seen as a process that commences before the employee starts work and extends through the first two or three months of employment. In the very best instances the new recruit is deliberately eased into the new job. Unit managers play a vital role in delivering the immediate induction programme and management programmes need to ensure that unit managers are themselves trained to train and their performance is monitored.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Kirill Blinov, Alexander Nikanorov, Bernard Nacke and Markus Klöpzig

Because of their widespread use in industry, induction through‐heaters of various metal products must be of high effectiveness not only in “quasi” steady‐state operation…

Abstract

Purpose

Because of their widespread use in industry, induction through‐heaters of various metal products must be of high effectiveness not only in “quasi” steady‐state operation but in different transient modes as well. Nowadays, they are usually designed to provide the required characteristics in “quasi” steady‐state operation mode mainly. The purpose of this paper is to examine numerical simulation of transient processes in induction through‐heating lines generally and investigate dynamic temperature fields during the first start of the heaters particularly.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology is based on coupled numerical electromagnetic and thermal analyses using FEM approach. ANSYS simulations are supported with the developed tools for imitation of mass transfer effects in continuous induction heating lines.

Findings

The results show that transient temperature fields in the heated strip or slab significantly differ from their “quasi” steady‐state descriptions. Local temperature variations acquired in longitudinal as well as transverse flux induction heaters during the first start have been predicted.

Practical implications

The received results can be used for design of induction through‐heaters and improvement of their characteristics in dynamic operation modes.

Originality/value

Investigation of dynamic characteristics of the heaters in dynamic modes can be only done by numerical modelling based on special algorithms providing a time loop additional to coupling between electromagnetic and thermal analyses. Such algorithms have been developed and used for investigation of two types of induction installations: through‐heaters of cylindrical billets for forging and heating lines of strip or thin slab for rolling mills.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Yuliya Pleshivtseva, Edgar Rapoport, Bernard Nacke, Alexander Nikanorov, Paolo Di Barba, Michele Forzan, Sergio Lupi and Elisabetta Sieni

The purpose of this paper is to describe main ideas and demonstrate results of the research activities carried out by the authors in the field of design concepts of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe main ideas and demonstrate results of the research activities carried out by the authors in the field of design concepts of induction mass heating technology based on multiple-criteria optimization. The main goal of the studies is the application of different optimization methods and numerical finite element method (FEM) codes for field analysis to solve the multi-objective optimization problem that is mathematically formulated in terms of the most important optimization criteria, for example, maximum temperature uniformity, maximum energy efficiency and minimum scale formation.

Design/methodology/approach

Standard genetic algorithm (GA), non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA) and alternance method of parametric optimization based on the optimal control theory are applied as effective tools for the practice-oriented problems for multiple-criteria optimization of induction heaters’ design based on non-linear coupled electromagnetic and temperature field analysis. Different approaches are used for combining FEM codes for interconnected field analysis and optimization algorithms into the automated optimization procedure.

Findings

Optimization procedures are tested and investigated for two- and three-criteria optimization problems solution on the examples of induction heating of a graphite disk, induction heating of aluminum and steel billets prior to hot forming.

Practical implications

Solved problems are based on the design of practical industrial applications. The developed optimization procedures are planned to be applied to the wide range of real-life problems of the optimal design and control of different electromagnetic devices and systems.

Originality/value

The paper describes main ideas and results of the research activities carried out by the authors during past years in the field of multiple-criteria optimization of induction heaters’ design based on numerical coupled electromagnetic and temperature field analysis. Implementing the automated procedure that combines a numerical FEM code for coupled field analysis with an optimization algorithm and its subsequent application for designing induction heaters makes the proposed approach specific and original. The paper also demonstrates that different optimization strategies used (standard GA, NSGA-II and the alternance method of optimal control theory) are effective for real-life industrial applications for multiple-criteria optimization of induction heaters design.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Deborah E.M. Mulders, Peter A.J. Berends and A. Georges L. Romme

The dynamic capability view serves to explain how particular practices ensure the firm's performance and competitiveness within a continuously changing environment. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The dynamic capability view serves to explain how particular practices ensure the firm's performance and competitiveness within a continuously changing environment. In this paper, the staff induction processes of two small firms in The Netherlands (management consultancy and biotech (BT) start‐up) are examined from a practice‐based view. The authors explore whether the staff induction processes of these firms can be regarded as practices, and if so, whether and how these firms have developed a dynamic capability in staff induction.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies are conducted in the management consultancy and biotechnology sectors to explore the practising of dynamic capability.

Findings

The findings suggest small firms can effectively develop and master their staff induction processes (as practices), but do this on the basis of ad hoc problem solving rather than a dynamic capability. If small firms develop any dynamic capability at all, they apparently do so towards specialized resources and processes that are perceived as most critical to the firm's continuity and performance (e.g. product development in the case of the BT firm). As such, this study confirms Winter's hypothesis about the fundamentally different cost structures of dynamic capabilities and ad hoc problem solving, which explains why dynamic capabilities tend to be rare and ad hoc problem solving prevails in many small organizations.

Originality/value

The paper examines the interaction between staff induction practices, dynamic capabilities, learning strategies, and ad hoc problem solving in two small firms. Implications for practitioners are that consciously engaging in learning strategies helps to adapt practices and build a dynamic capability in staff induction.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

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