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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Mike Zapp

This article put forward two claims. First, it argues that, historically, the rationale for education has shifted from religious and national indoctrination to, in the…

Abstract

This article put forward two claims. First, it argues that, historically, the rationale for education has shifted from religious and national indoctrination to, in the more recent neoliberal period, human capital and the related notion of individual empowerment. Second, the article argues that the recent shift toward individual empowerment is reflected in international organizations’ (IOs) changing emphases in education. IOs’ educational agenda has undergone various changes since their early work in the 1960s: From the structural expansion of national education systems to the measurement of individual educational achievement through a focus on competencies and, most recently, individual psychosocial development.

Based on a content analysis of 60 documents from 38 IOs involved in international education networks between 1990 and 2015, this work identified an expanding field of IOs directing attention to the mental capabilities of a learner. The proliferated model of an individual actorhood reflected in these novel assessment designs will be presented and embedded in wider discussions about the cultural construction of the individual in contemporary world polity.

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Cross-nationally Comparative, Evidence-based Educational Policymaking and Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-767-8

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Cross-nationally Comparative, Evidence-based Educational Policymaking and Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-767-8

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Don Stewart and Jenny McWhirter

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue and outline the essential features of the resilient school approach, and the child‐focused…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue and outline the essential features of the resilient school approach, and the child‐focused approach of Noreen Wetton in her work in health education on understanding children and young people.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows distillation of the key principles used in the two complementary approaches.

Findings

The paper finds that resilience is a life event phenomenon that buffers against circumstances that normally overwhelm a person's coping capacity. It is linked with “coherence”, or the ability to handle stress‐related problems, “connectedness” and the ecological model encompassing a lifespan approach, within key settings that influence the individual's psychosocial development. Preventive population health practices that address the strengthening of human, social and organisational capital may well promise greater success in fostering population health, and particularly resilience, than traditional psycho‐educational strategies. These become increasingly effective as the whole school approach is implemented as young people engage and participate fully in research and decision making – key principles of Noreen Wetton's approach to health promotion.

Practical implications

The paper shows the need to focus on seeking the positive in any educational opportunity, to listen to young people and find out what they believe and feel, and to address health problems through attempting to strengthen people's capacity to cope rather than just shielding them from adversity.

Originality/value

The paper, in showing this is the first time these two strands have been brought together in this way, has a wide value widely across health education and health promotion.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2011

Barry Ingham

The aim of this study was to provide a pilot evaluation of novel, brief formulation development workshops with direct care staff supporting people with intellectual…

Abstract

The aim of this study was to provide a pilot evaluation of novel, brief formulation development workshops with direct care staff supporting people with intellectual disabilities who display significant psychosocial difficulties. A series of workshops were designed and delivered to a staff team supporting an individual who had been referred to specialist intellectual disabilities health services. The workshops used a psychosocial framework to facilitate development with care staff of a case formulation for the individual they were supporting. Following the workshops, there were decreases in problematic behaviours displayed by the individual and in the staff team's perception of the severity of these behaviours. The staff team felt that the workshops had had a beneficial impact on their practice. The pilot indicated that the workshops were feasible, positively received and associated with changes in the psychosocial difficulties displayed by the individuals staff were supporting.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Ann Ritchie and Paul Genoni

This evaluative research represents the first report in the literature to date in which a group mentoring programme has been evaluated using a quasi‐experimental research…

Abstract

This evaluative research represents the first report in the literature to date in which a group mentoring programme has been evaluated using a quasi‐experimental research design. Results indicated that the programme was effective in one domain of professionalism, the main outcome variable; and that career‐development outcomes were significantly higher in programme participants. In addition to the previously established functions of mentoring (career and psychosocial development), the research suggests that the conceptual basis of mentoring should be expanded to include the function of professionalism. This has implications for both the practical aspects of mentoring programme development and for future evaluative research. Data were collected by means of pre‐ and post‐test questionnaires and analysed by multiple regression analysis.

Details

Library Management, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Connie R Wanberg, Elizabeth T Welsh and Sarah A Hezlett

Organizations have become increasingly interested in developing their human resources. One tool that has been explored in this quest is mentoring. This has led to a surge…

Abstract

Organizations have become increasingly interested in developing their human resources. One tool that has been explored in this quest is mentoring. This has led to a surge in mentoring research and an increase in the number of formal mentoring programs implemented in organizations. This review provides a survey of the empirical work on mentoring that is organized around the major questions that have been investigated. Then a conceptual model, focused on formal mentoring relationships, is developed to help understand the mentoring process. The model draws upon research from a diverse body of literature, including interpersonal relationships, career success, training and development, and informal mentoring. Finally, a discussion of critical next steps for research in the mentoring domain is presented.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2019

Shelly Schaefer and Gina Erickson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how adolescent arrest and correctional confinement impact psychosocial development during the transition to adulthood.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how adolescent arrest and correctional confinement impact psychosocial development during the transition to adulthood.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a US-based sample of 12,100 youth in junior and high school and again in early adulthood. Factor analyses determine measurement of psychosocial maturity (PSM) and subsequently compare baseline and subsequent psychosocial development in a multivariate framework for males and females.

Findings

Findings show that net of socio-demographic and delinquency-related controls, all three groups have similar baseline psychosocial measures pre-confinement but by early adulthood (ages 18–25) there are significant differences between the two justice-involved groups for multiple measure of psychosocial well-being, net of any differences at baseline. Differences are exacerbated for females.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest the need for juvenile correctional facilities to incorporate programming that allows juveniles to build psychosocial skills through activities that mirror typical adolescent responsibilities, behaviors and tasks.

Originality/value

The authors compare PSM development for three groups of adolescents: non-justice-involved youth, youth who were arrested but not confined before age 18 (arrested non-confined), and delinquent youth who served time in out-of-home correctional placement before age 18 (confined) to compare development and changes in psychosocial development over time. Further, the authors examine the interaction of gender and confinement to explore if the context of confinement disrupts PSM development differently for females.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Katja Schuller

Due to the “European Union Framework Directive on Safety and Health at work” (Directive 89/391/EEC, 1989), every employer is obliged to avoid psychosocial hazards when…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the “European Union Framework Directive on Safety and Health at work” (Directive 89/391/EEC, 1989), every employer is obliged to avoid psychosocial hazards when designing work. Little is known empirically about the barriers that workplace actors experience while developing and implementing OSH measures that prevent psychosocial hazards. The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers, causes and attempts to overcome them and discusses them with reference to relevant theoretical concepts and models that help to explain how these barriers hinder the development and implementation of OSH measures.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with workplace actors in charge of psychosocial risk assessment (PRA) were conducted in 41 business cases, and transcripts were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Barriers, causes and attempts to overcome them were extracted inductively and discussed with reference to relevant theories and explanatory models.

Findings

The complex nature of psychosocial risks, hindering general beliefs, lack of a perceived scope for risk avoidance, lack of assumptions of responsibility among players on all hierarchical levels, discrepancies between formal responsibility and decision authority, and low reflexivity on processes of development and implementation of interventions were described as barriers. Causes and attempts to overcome these barriers were reflected upon by workplace actors.

Practical implications

Recommendations on the organisation of PRA will be given with respect to the reported results and relevant research in this field.

Originality/value

This qualitative study explores the barriers to developing and implementing OSH measures to eliminate psychosocial hazards, from the perspective of actors in charge of PRA, and why they might fail.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Sanjay Kumar Singh, Shashank Mittal, Atri Sengupta and Rabindra Kumar Pradhan

This study aims to examine a dual-pathway model that recognizes two distinct (formal and informal) but complementary mechanisms of knowledge exchanges – knowledge sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine a dual-pathway model that recognizes two distinct (formal and informal) but complementary mechanisms of knowledge exchanges – knowledge sharing and knowledge helping. It also investigates how team members use their limited human and psychosocial capital for prosocial knowledge effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based approach was used to examine the hypotheses of the study. A moderated-mediation model was proposed and tested using bootstrap approach.

Findings

Knowledge sharing and knowledge helping were found to be the significant links through which human capital (capability) and psychosocial capital (motivation and efficacy) significantly predict prosocial knowledge effectiveness. Post hoc analysis suggests that human capital through knowledge sharing influences team learning, whereas the psychosocial capital through knowledge helping influences team leadership.

Originality/value

The present study found two distinct but complementary and yet necessary mechanisms of knowledge exchanges to be linked as the important outlay for the human and psychosocial capital to be effective in the prosocial knowledge behaviours.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

M Fleming, A Savage‐Grainge, C Martin, C Hill, S Brown, J Buckle and J Miles

Despite the efficacy, political will and numbers of mental health practitioners trained in psychosocial interventions, they remain scarcely available in routine clinical…

Abstract

Despite the efficacy, political will and numbers of mental health practitioners trained in psychosocial interventions, they remain scarcely available in routine clinical practice. External factors such as the inability of mental health organisations to develop strategies to support the use of psychosocial interventions have been implicated. This study compares data from two groups, one that had completed psychosocial intervention training (n=104) and one that had not received psychosocial intervention training (n=102). Both groups completed measures of self‐efficacy, locus of control and an application of psychosocial interventions to practice. Results showed that psychosocial intervention training significantly increased the level of self‐efficacy for using psychosocial interventions in practice. The group that had received psychosocial interventions training had lower internal locus of control orientation. Self‐efficacy was significantly related to using psychosocial interventions in practice. There is a discussion of the implications of these findings.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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