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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Majid Mohammad Shafiee, Pantea Foroudi and Reihaneh Alsadat Tabaeeian

This paper aims to investigate the impact of memorable destination experience and destination attractiveness on tourist-destination identification and destination love. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of memorable destination experience and destination attractiveness on tourist-destination identification and destination love. It also investigates the moderating role of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the cluster sampling method, the study selected cities of a developing country with the most popular destinations. A questionnaire survey was used to collect data from a sample of foreign and domestic tourists. To test the research model, a covariance-based structural equation modelling approach was adopted.

Findings

According to the results, destination attractiveness and memorable experience had a positive effect on tourist-destination identification. Similarly, tourist-destination identification positively influenced destination love. In addition, destination love impacts the intention to revisit and word-of-mouth. Finally, the results indicate that gender moderates some of these relationships.

Originality/value

Understanding what items can create strong bonds between destination and tourist is of great importance. By providing a validated conceptual model that traces the relationship between memorable experience, destination attractiveness and tourist-destination identification through cognitive, affective and evaluative dimensions, this study attempts to answer prior calls for examination from the viewpoint of tourism scholars.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Ali Mursid and Cedric Hsi-Jui Wu

This study aims to examine the effect of halal company identity includes halal identity similarity, halal identity distinctiveness and halal identity prestige on customer…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of halal company identity includes halal identity similarity, halal identity distinctiveness and halal identity prestige on customer satisfaction and customer trust. Furthermore, it verifies the influence of customer satisfaction and customer trust on customer-company identification. Finally, it explores the effect of customer-company identification on halal restaurant loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

This study selected a sample of halal restaurants in the area of Semarang City, Indonesia, using a purposive sampling method with a total of 520 respondents. The data analysis uses confirmatory factor analysis to identify discriminant and convergent validity and then structural equation modeling is used to validate the hypotheses.

Findings

The result showed that all aspects of halal company identity, namely, halal identity similarity, halal identity distinctiveness and halal identity prestige, significantly affect customer satisfaction. Halal identity similarity and halal identity distinctiveness insignificantly affect customer trust; however, halal identity prestige successfully affects customer trust. Both customer satisfaction and customer trust positively impact customer-company identification and, in turn, customer-company identification impacts halal restaurant loyalty.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the theory of halal tourism based on social identity theory and the theory of relationship quality in achieving customer loyalty of halal restaurants.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Rafael Bravo, José Miguel Pina and Beatriz Tirado

This study aims to examine the internal brand knowledge dissemination process in the banking sector and its effects on employees. Specifically, it focuses on the key roles…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the internal brand knowledge dissemination process in the banking sector and its effects on employees. Specifically, it focuses on the key roles of employee identification with both the organization and with the customer as antecedents of behaviors supportive of the brand, i.e. employee citizenship behaviors and recommendation behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was carried out in a major Spanish bank. Data gathered from a survey of 315 employees were analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results showed that employees' perceptions of brand value congruence are key in explaining their identification with both the organization and with the customer. However, the employees' perceptions of the brand's authenticity explained only their recommendations of the bank as a good place to work.

Originality/value

These findings contribute to the advance in the current knowledge of the role of variables such as brand authenticity and employee–customer identification in internal brand management. From a managerial viewpoint, the results provide insights into the importance of employees' perceptions and attitudes when it comes to brand knowledge dissemination.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Yueyue Liu, Meng Xi, Feifei Li and Xiulin Geng

Corporate entrepreneurship is an important way for organizations to gain competitive advantages and achieve sustainable development. However, few studies pay attention to…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate entrepreneurship is an important way for organizations to gain competitive advantages and achieve sustainable development. However, few studies pay attention to the influence of CEO strategic leadership on corporate entrepreneurship. Drawing on social identity theory and uncertainty-identity theory, this study aims to investigate whether CEO relationship-focused leadership impacts corporate entrepreneurship through middle managers’ (MMs’) organizational identification and whether the indirect effect is moderated by environmental uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 192 Chinese samples with 192 firm-level and 716 department-level observations, this study uses multilevel structural equations modeling by Mplus 8.0 to test the theoretical model.

Findings

This study finds that CEO relationship-focused leadership positively predicts MMs’ organizational identification and corporate entrepreneurship, and MMs’ organizational identification mediates the relationship between CEO relationship-focused leadership and corporate entrepreneurship. In addition, environmental uncertainty moderates not only the relationship between CEO relationship-focused leadership and MMs’ organizational identification but also the indirect effect of CEO relationship-focused leadership on corporate entrepreneurship through MMs’ organizational identification.

Research limitations/implications

This study enriches the understanding of process and contextualization of CEO strategic leadership influencing on corporate entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is among the first to explore the influence of CEO relationship-focused leadership on corporate entrepreneurship.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2021

Laurence Dessart and Cleopatra Veloutsou

In an era where companies shift a part of their marketing budget to support their social media presence, very little is known about the antecedents and effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

In an era where companies shift a part of their marketing budget to support their social media presence, very little is known about the antecedents and effects of participant identification in a social media community. This paper aims to examine the antecedents of community identification in a Facebook company-managed brand community, for inactive members, using the uses and gratification theory. Brand community identification is also expected to lead to higher levels of brand loyalty for these members.

Design/methodology/approach

This research reports the results of a quantitative with survey data from 389 members of a variety of different official Facebook pages.

Findings

The results reveal that inactive members of Facebook pages can be influenced to act in a way that is beneficial for a company. Perceived human and information value of the brand Facebook page lead members to identify with a brand community and identification is a strong predictor of loyalty to the brand.

Practical implications

This paper provides suggestions to managers on the development of brand community value that can increase brand community identification and loyalty of apparently inactive brand community members.

Originality/value

By showing that brand community identification and loyalty exist for users with low activity levels, this research challenges the widely accepted idea that only highly active members are valuable in online brand communities. Specifically, it reveals the most important motivations for these members to identify with the community and be loyal to the brand.

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Lei Luo, Tyreal Yizhou Qian, Gregg Rich and James J. Zhang

The current study was designed to (1) identify core and peripheral market demand for a recurring hallmark sporting event, testing their impact on event identification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study was designed to (1) identify core and peripheral market demand for a recurring hallmark sporting event, testing their impact on event identification and behavioral intentions; and to (2) explore the effect of core and peripheral market demand on event identification between first-time and repeat spectators.

Design/methodology/approach

Research participants (N = 540) were spectators at the Shanghai Masters over a span of seven days. Data were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) and partial least squares multi-group analysis (PLS-MGA).

Findings

Significant, positive relationships were found between core market demand and event identification, and between core market demand and behavioral intentions. In contrast, peripheral market demand only had significant, positive effect on event identification; however, findings revealed that event identification fully mediated the relationships between peripheral market demand and behavioral intentions. Additionally, the effect of peripheral market demand on event identification was greater among first-time spectators than repeat spectators.

Originality/value

This study contributed to the application of PLS-SEM in sport management research by adopting a formative-formative hierarchical component model (HCM) to address the prevailing measurement model misspecification of market demand constructs. The findings highlighted the merits of promoting market demand associated with recurring hallmark sporting events and the importance of enhancing event identification through differential market penetration schemes across different spectator groups.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Jenny Chen and Helena D. Cooper-Thomas

With organizations hiring from increasingly diverse labor markets, this study aims to examine the implications of newcomers’ individual differentiation for their group…

Abstract

Purpose

With organizations hiring from increasingly diverse labor markets, this study aims to examine the implications of newcomers’ individual differentiation for their group identification. The paper proposes and tests a self-verification process in which individual differentiation predicts group identification through role innovation under positive social feedback on innovation (moderated mediation). Simultaneously, a self-categorization pathway is examined of the indirect negative influence of individual differentiation on group identification through role modeling (mediation).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected at three time points from 161 UK university alumni.

Findings

The analyses support a self-verification pathway: newcomers with high individual differentiation report higher group identification via role innovation only when they receive positive feedback on their innovative actions. However, there was no support for a self-categorization pathway, with no indirect relationship found between individual differentiation and group identification via role modeling.

Practical implications

HR practitioners and managers who are responsible for helping newcomers adjust should consider newcomers’ individual differentiation. Specifically, newcomers with high individual differentiation may more successfully navigate their transition and identify with their workgroup when given appropriate support, such as positive social feedback on their innovative actions.

Originality/value

The study extends organizational socialization research by focusing on when newcomers with high individual differentiation may experience group identification. The findings highlight the important role of positive social feedback on group identification; this suggests a potential means by which newcomers with high individual differentiation can settle successfully.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Rinki Dahiya

With the enhancing notions of job insecurity in employees, the objective of this study is to revisit the association between job insecurity and employee performance…

Abstract

Purpose

With the enhancing notions of job insecurity in employees, the objective of this study is to revisit the association between job insecurity and employee performance behaviour (task performance and contextual performance) with the mediating role of organizational identification. Specifically, the study examines how and why there is a negative link between job insecurity and performance and whether organizational identification may serve as a mediating mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lagged survey of 192 employees having heterogeneous working background was analysed using the structural equation modelling (SEM) technique.

Findings

The findings highlight that the nexus between job insecurity and organizational citizenship behaviour is fully mediated by organizational identification. However, the organizational identification partially mediated the association between job insecurity and task performance.

Originality/value

The tendency of job insecurity in India is on the rise. This investigation gives a more profound comprehension of behavioural responses of job insecurity on employee performance behaviour with the social identity theoretical perspective. The study contributes to the extant literature by revisiting the model proposed by Piccoli et al. (2017) and includes organizational identification as a mediating mechanism, which has remained unexplored till now in the context of Indian manufacturing industry.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Suresh Cuganesan and Clinton Free

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system (MCS) changes that were new public management (NPM) inspired.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a longitudinal case study of a large Australian state police department utilizing an abductive research design.

Findings

The authors found that identification processes strongly conditioned the reception of the MCS changes introduced. Initially, the authors observed mixed interpretations of controls as both enabling and coercive. Over time, these changes were seen to be coercive because they threatened interpersonal relationships and the importance and efficacy of squads in combating serious and organized crime.

Research limitations/implications

The authors contributed to MCSs literature by revealing the critical role that multifaceted relational and collective identification processes played in shaping interpretations of controls as enabling–coercive. The authors build on this to elaborate on the notion of employees’ centricity in the MCS design.

Practical implications

This study suggests that, in complex organizational settings, the MCS design and change should reckon with pre-existing patterns of employees’ identification.

Originality/value

The authors suggested shifting the starting point for contemplating the MCS change: from looking at how what employees do is controlled to how the change impacts and how employees feel about who they are. When applied to the MCS design, employee centricity highlights the value of collaborative co-design, attentiveness to relational identification between employees, feedback and interaction in place of inferred management expectations and traditional mechanistic approaches.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Kirsty Wright, Amy Mundorff, Janet Chaseling, Christopher Maguire and Denis I. Crane

The purpose of this paper is to reveal difficulties associated with identifying child victims of the 2004 South-East Asia Tsunami at the Thai Tsunami Victim Identification

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal difficulties associated with identifying child victims of the 2004 South-East Asia Tsunami at the Thai Tsunami Victim Identification (TTVI) operation in Phuket and explores two strategies that increased child identifications.

Design/methodology/approach

Data allowing comparison of identification proportions between adult and child (defined as ⩽16 years old) victims of six nationalities and the forensic methods used to establish identification were used in this study.

Findings

The first 100 days of the operation revealed that the proportion of adult identifications far outweighed the proportion of child identifications. Moreover, the younger the child, the longer the identification process took (p<0.0001). Children under the age of 1 year took an average of 195 days to identify compared to 130 days for children aged 16. Identification was extended, on average, 4.3 days for each year that victims younger were than 16. Identifying large numbers of child victims requires targeted protocols. Two efforts increased child identifications for the TTVI operation: using body length to distinguish post-mortem (PM) DNA samples potentially belonging to children for targeted testing, and singling out deceased parents of missing children who were previously identified by a modality other than DNA, in order to retrieve and test their PM samples as references for kinship matching. Disaster victim identification operations with similar characteristics may benefit from implementing a strategy targeting child identifications.

Originality/value

The implementation of these two strategies at the TTVI helped to overcome initial complexities, namely, the lack of ante-mortem and PM material, and increased child identifications.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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