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1 – 10 of over 186000
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2022

Liudmila Tarabashkina, Alua Devine and Pascale G. Quester

Consumers seldom consider end-use consumption (reuse or upcycling) when products reach the end of their lifecycle. This study shows that end-use consumption can be…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers seldom consider end-use consumption (reuse or upcycling) when products reach the end of their lifecycle. This study shows that end-use consumption can be encouraged if individuals are primed to think creatively, engage in end-use ideation (imagine end-use) and become inspired by more original ideas.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were carried out. Study 1 tested if creativity priming resulted in more effective end-use ideation (greater number of ideas and more original ideas) compared to environmental appeals and no intervention. Study 2 tested the effectiveness of creativity priming in a longitudinal setting. Study 3 demonstrated how creativity priming and end-use ideation could be practically executed using product packaging.

Findings

Creativity priming represents an effective intervention to stimulate end-use consumption with particularly positive results amongst less creative consumers. However, it was not the number of generated ideas, but their originality during end-use ideation that triggered inspiration.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates which interventions are more effective in changing consumer behaviour in favour of more sustainable practices.

Practical implications

Increasing environmental degradation requires consumers to change their behaviour by re-consuming products. This study shows that consumers can adopt end-use if they are primed to think creatively, imagine end-use consumption and generate more original ideas.

Originality/value

Creative thinking has been leveraged at product development stages, but not at the end of products’ lifecycle. This study integrated creativity priming, consumer imagination and inspiration theories to explain the underlying mechanism behind end-use consumption to scale up its adoption by consumers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2022

Minseong Kim and Sae-Mi Lee

Prior research in the human resources management fields focused primarily on one type of employees’ pro-environmental behaviors yet failed to empirically investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research in the human resources management fields focused primarily on one type of employees’ pro-environmental behaviors yet failed to empirically investigate interrelationships among the distinct dimensions of their pro-environmental behaviors. To build a deeper understanding of the psychological process in becoming an environmental activist in the workplace, this study aims to examine the interrelationships among frontline employees’ green autonomous motivation, green external motivation, environmental concern, self-efficacy and three types of pro-environmental behaviors (i.e. green idea generation behavior, green idea promotion behavior and green idea activist behavior).

Design/methodology/approach

With the survey method, the data were collected from frontline employees working at hospitality enterprises in South Korea. This study analyzed the collected data, including frequency analysis, reliability analysis, correlation analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The empirical results showed that autonomous motivation significantly influenced environmental concern, self-efficacy, green idea generation behavior and green idea promotion behavior. Also, external motivation significantly affected environmental concern, self-efficacy and green idea promotion behavior. Furthermore, environmental concern had significant influences on self-efficacy and green idea promotion behavior, and self-efficacy had significant effects on green idea generation behavior and green idea promotion behavior. Finally, green idea activist behavior was significantly influenced by green idea generation behavior and green idea promotion behavior only.

Practical implications

This study proposes managerial implications to hospitality organizations and public policymakers for maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of their green initiatives via frontline employees’ green idea activist behavior.

Originality/value

Based on the empirical findings, this study proposes several theoretical and practical implications for the extant literature and the service industry in the context of frontline employees’ three types of pro-environmental behaviors from their working motivation.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Arthur B. VanGundy

Among the many different methods used to generate new product ideas, group brainstorming has been one of the most popular. However, brainstorming has fallen into disfavor…

1634

Abstract

Among the many different methods used to generate new product ideas, group brainstorming has been one of the most popular. However, brainstorming has fallen into disfavor with many practitioners and researchers on the basis of such factors as the necessity for a skilled group leader, the potential for conflicts among members which can disrupt the process, and the possibility of one or more members dominating the discussion. Brainwriting, which is the silent, written generation of ideas by a group, is proposed as an alternative to brainstorming. Six different group brainiwriting techniques are described and suggestions given for the most appropriate use of each. It is concluded that both brainwriting and brainstorming will be useful in different situations and should be viewed as supplemental rather than primary sources of new product ideas. Furthermore, it is noted that idea generation is only part of the process. The best ideas in the world will be of little value if they are not implemented successfully.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Larry Richards

This paper aims to offer a personal reflection on the 2012 joint conference of the American Society for Cybernetics and the Bateson Idea Group, “An Ecology of Ideas”. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a personal reflection on the 2012 joint conference of the American Society for Cybernetics and the Bateson Idea Group, “An Ecology of Ideas”. The intent is to raise awareness, through examples, of ideas – and their associated ways of thinking – that the author tends to take for granted in the work as systems theorists as well as in everyday life, yet ideas that confound the very social issues the conferees were trying to address.

Design/methodology/approach

The thoughts expressed arose after five days of listening to presentations and discussions, both formal and informal. The approach is conversational, with a desire to stimulate further conversation.

Findings

Certain versions of systems theory – whole systems, purposeful systems, systems theory as ideology – rely on ideas that although written about extensively in philosophical and socio-political works go unchallenged in everyday life. Three of these ideas – hierarchy, purpose, belief – are embedded in the way of talking about, and the language used to formulate, solutions to social problems. The suggestion is to avoid or suspend these ideas so that alternatives can be considered.

Originality/value

Idea avoidance offers those who study social change and/or those who participate in making it happen a way to escape the stuckness of ideas so ingrained in the everyday ways of thinking that they go unnoticed.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Pradeep Kumar Ponnamma Divakaran

The purpose of this paper is to explore when, why and to what extent firms should intervene in firm-hosted idea-generation communities, and to develop a framework for…

265

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore when, why and to what extent firms should intervene in firm-hosted idea-generation communities, and to develop a framework for firm-intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case-study is conducted in a highly successful firm-hosted idea-generation community called Dell IdeaStorm, whereby the netnographic approach is applied.

Findings

The findings indicate that, overall, firm-participation is minimal and passive, and varies according to the three stages of the idea lifecycle in the community, such as ideation stage – here firm-participation is limited to acknowledgement of new ideas, checking for redundancy, managing search tool and profanity filtering; discussion and development stage – here firm-participation is more active by providing feedback and clarification when needed, troubleshooting, asking for additional input on an idea, etc.; and completion stage – here a firm intervenes to screen and select the most promising ideas for implementation and also provides status updates on ideas.

Originality/value

This study contributes by developing a new framework for firm-participation, which is useful for the early diagnosis of community issues in idea generation. The framework is also a tactical tool which can be used to guide community managers in selecting the correct moderation approach, depending on the specific stage in the idea lifecycle.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Alex Barnett

Decision making is an inherently simple process, but soon becomes complicated when a number of people are involved in the decision‐making process. How can a group move…

900

Abstract

Decision making is an inherently simple process, but soon becomes complicated when a number of people are involved in the decision‐making process. How can a group move from a situation of disagreement or conflict to compromise or consensus, yet have confidence that the ultimate decision reflects the best solution to a problem? Describes the “traditional” methodology for managing the resolution of issues within groups and goes on to point out the limitations of this approach and ways in which it can be improved. The resulting methodology is a time‐efficient issue resolution process, which ensures that all team members are given the opportunity to contribute their ideas and opinions of the selected solution. This results in full commitment.

Details

Work Study, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Pradeep Kumar Ponnamma Divakaran

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for identifying the most promising user-generated ideas in user communities.

494

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for identifying the most promising user-generated ideas in user communities.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop the framework, each user-generated idea is first classified into a specific category depending on its source, such as market trend-, need-, solution- or mental ideation-based ideas. The degree of shared identity (shared agreement minus shared disagreement) based on user votes for each idea within the user community is then evaluated.

Findings

This study argues that unlike need-based user-generated ideas, trend-based ideas will not succeed in the marketplace even if they receive the highest ratings or the most votes from community members, and that hence such trend-based ideas should not be implemented. Moreover, solution- and mental ideation-based user ideas, even though they receive the lowest ratings or fewest votes from community members, are more likely to succeed in the marketplace, and thus, such ideas should not be discarded.

Originality/value

Community- and idea-level variables are combined to identify the most promising user-generated ideas for firms. This prevents overlooking the most promising ideas simply because their popularity is low within the user community. Moreover, this method prevents selecting the least promising ideas even though their popularity is high with the user community.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Matthijs den Besten

The purpose of this paper is to explore consequences of the use of social media for idea generation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore consequences of the use of social media for idea generation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes over 600 ideas submitted to a Slate‐Twitter contest to find the best short characterization of the American Declaration of Independence. These findings are then compared with those of Kornish and Ulrich, who analyzed idea‐contests in classroom settings.

Findings

In the Slate‐Twitter contest, repetition of ideas was rare while recombination was frequent. The evolution in the total number of unique ideas suggests that the contest became more focused over time. It also appears that ideas that are recognized as valuable attract similar ideas in turn.

Research limitations/implications

Further checks will be needed with regard to the robustness of the findings. Furthermore, while the current analysis relies on peer review by participants to the contest to value submissions, results might be different if it were done on the basis of independent external reviews. Conceptually, the findings suggest that idea generation via social media has a more iterative character than previously analyzed forms of broadcast search. Future research could investigate what triggers more exploration and exploitation of ideas in this process.

Practical implications

For businesses, which are more and more encouraged to engage in open innovation, the analysis can serve as guide on the use of social media for information collection.

Originality/value

The paper provides a simple and effective method to monitor social media, which firms can use to their advantage.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Guendalina Capece

The purpose of this paper is to present a new metric that aims to quantitatively support the selection phase of a new e‐business idea by performing an evaluation of its…

1084

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a new metric that aims to quantitatively support the selection phase of a new e‐business idea by performing an evaluation of its distinctness. The paper seeks to explain the reasons for the creation of a new parameter, called “E‐distinctivity”, the identification of the metrics to assess it and aims to present the results of its evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to visualize the new parameter and to execute all the needed evaluations a two‐dimensional radar chart has been created “ad hoc”. The radar chart is built on eight crucial characteristics divided into four principal zones representing the strategic aspects of the E‐distinctivity. In order to assess the soundness of the identified parameter its evaluation on a reference group of well‐known e‐business ventures has been performed.

Findings

The E‐distinctivity parameter permits easy comparison among many different alternative ideas during a feasibility phase and provides quantitative data to evaluate these ideas without requiring huge investments.

Research limitations/implications

This parameter is not intended to be sufficient for an exhaustive feasibility assessment of an e‐business idea. Additional investigation is necessary to determine other parameters and evaluation tasks to improve the accuracy of the model. The aim is to support the selection phase of a new e‐business idea with the aid of new parameters that integrate traditional methods of business analysis.

Originality/value

The study identified an original parameter to be evaluated on a given e‐business idea in order to provide a quantitative measure of its distinctness.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Betty Vandenbosch and Argun Saatcioglu

The purpose of the paper is to describe a study of the styles and patterns people use to recognize the need for ideas, and generate and evaluate them to determine if

1911

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe a study of the styles and patterns people use to recognize the need for ideas, and generate and evaluate them to determine if understanding those patterns can help executives improve creativity and innovation in their organizations. People generally assume that good ideas are the result of good management and bad management leads to a dearth of them. But it might not be that simple.

Design/methodology/approach

We talked with 49 senior executives about their process for generating and implementing ideas. Their approaches to information, problem solving, and interacting with people both inside and outside their organizations determined the kinds of ideas they generate and consider.

Findings

We identified five distinct strategies or idea management types among the executives with whom we spoke: Incrementalists who take small steps and whose ideas are usually modest changes; Consensus builders who focus on agreement among stakeholders rather than ideas, per se; Searchers who combine information from diverse places and whose ideas result from unusual associations; Debaters who argue with themselves to develop ideas; and Assessors who are constantly revisiting their approaches and choices.

Research limitations/implications

While our research is limited by the small number of executives with which we interacted, it points to the implication that to develop organizations that foster creativity, it is important to understand the ways that people engage in idea generation and evaluation. It may be fruitful to focus on how people inquire about the world around them and to select people with behaviour patterns that fit with the requirements of the task at hand.

Originality/value

Shows that understanding idea management inclinations may improve organizational creativity and innovation, and performance of management in general.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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