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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Helen Jane Liebling, Hazel Rose Barrett and Lillian Artz

This British Academy/Leverhulme-funded research (Grant number: SG170394) investigated the experiences and impact of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and torture on…

Abstract

Purpose

This British Academy/Leverhulme-funded research (Grant number: SG170394) investigated the experiences and impact of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and torture on South Sudanese refugees’ health and rights and the responses of health and justice services in Northern Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

It involved thematic analysis of the narratives of 20 men and 41 women refugees’ survivors of SGBV and torture; this included their experiences in South Sudan, their journeys to Uganda and experiences in refugee settlements. In total, 37 key stakeholders including health and justice providers, police, non-government and government organisations were also interviewed regarding their experiences of providing services to refugees.

Findings

All refugees had survived human rights abuses carried out in South Sudan, on route to Uganda and within Uganda. Incidents of violence, SGBV, torture and other human rights abuses declined significantly for men in Uganda, but women reported SGBV incidents. The research demonstrates linkages between the physical, psychological, social/cultural and justice/human rights impact on women and men refugees, which amplified the impact of their experiences. There was limited screening, physical and psychological health and support services; including livelihoods and education. Refugees remained concerned about violence and SGBV in the refugee settlements. While they all knew of the reporting system for such incidents, they questioned the effectiveness of the process. For this reason, women opted for family reconciliation rather than reporting domestic violence or SGBV to the authorities. Men found it hard to report incidences due to high levels of stigma and shame.

Research limitations/implications

Refugees largely fled South Sudan to escape human rights abuses including, persecution, SGBV and torture. Their experiences resulted in physical, psychological, social-cultural and justice effects that received limited responses by health and justice services. An integrated approach to meeting refugees’ needs is required.

Practical implications

The authors make recommendations for integrated gender sensitive service provision for refugees including more systematic screening, assessment and treatment of SGBV and torture physical and emotional injuries combined with implementation of livelihoods and social enterprises.

Social implications

The research demonstrates that stigma and shame, particularly for male refugee survivors of SGBV and torture, impacts on ability to report these incidents and seek treatment. Increasing gender sensitivity of services to these issues, alongside provision of medical treatment for injuries, alongside improved informal justice processes, may assist to counteract shame and increase disclosure.

Originality/value

There is currently a lack of empirical investigation of this subject area, therefore this research makes a contribution to the subject of understanding refugees’ experiences of SGBV and torture, as well as their perceptions of service provision and response. This subject is strategically important due to the pressing need to develop integrated, gendered and culturally sensitive services that listen to the voices and draw on the expertise of refugees themselves while using their skills to inform improvements in service responses and policy.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Emily Vardell and Deborah H. Charbonneau

This study investigates the intersections of health and social justice topics in the library and information science (LIS) curriculum. Course offerings from 60 American…

Abstract

This study investigates the intersections of health and social justice topics in the library and information science (LIS) curriculum. Course offerings from 60 American Library Association-Accredited LIS programs were extracted and comprised the study sample. Using a thematic content analysis, a total of 220 course descriptions were analyzed to assess the inclusion of health justice topics. A main finding was that only eight LIS course descriptions closely integrated health and social justice issues. In addition, four overarching thematic areas of LIS courses were identified from the dataset as conceptual pathways with the potential to further incorporate health justice aspects in LIS coursework. Recommendations for how to expand course offerings in these areas are explored. Overall, these preliminary findings help to map the existing health and social justice curricula and contribute the LIS educator viewpoint for both reducing health disparities and advancing health justice conversations.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2020

Praveen Kumar Sharma and Rajeev Kumra

Workplace spirituality is presently a prominent research topic and is gaining recognition and importance among industry professionals and academicians. Workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace spirituality is presently a prominent research topic and is gaining recognition and importance among industry professionals and academicians. Workplace spirituality is defined as a sense of community, meaningful work and organizational values. The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the relationship between workplace spirituality and mental health, wherein employee engagement is considered as a mediator. Furthermore, this study examines the mediating role of employee engagement in the relationship between organizational justice and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 344 information technology professionals working in India. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the model fit of workplace spirituality and its relationship to employee engagement, organizational justice and mental health.

Findings

The results revealed that workplace spirituality and organizational justice significantly and positively predict employee engagement, which is significantly related to employee mental health. The results also revealed that employee engagement significantly partially mediates the relationship between workplace spirituality and mental health as well as the relationship between organizational justice and mental health.

Research limitations/implications

Results of research guide HR professionals, employee mental health concerns can be addressed by promoting workplace spirituality, improving employee engagement strategies and implementing organizational justice policies that are perceived to be fair. This study makes a significant contribution to the extant literature regarding mental health issues in the IT sector.

Originality/value

Findings of this research contribute to the area of human resource management and employee engagement. The current study fills a gap in the extant literature by investigating employee engagement intervening mechanism between organizational justice, workplace spirituality and mental health.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Dwayne Devonish, Anne Kouvonen and Iain Coyne

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediational effects of positive and negative emotions in the relationship between organisational justice and health.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediational effects of positive and negative emotions in the relationship between organisational justice and health.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross‐sectional research obtained data from 206 workers employed within the financial/banking, manufacturing, and retail industries in Barbados.

Findings

Structural equation modelling analyses revealed that positive and negative emotions completely mediated the effects of relational justice (but not procedural justice) on overall health.

Research limitations/implications

Research was cross‐sectional, and relied on self‐report measures. The findings suggest that employers must properly evaluate their health and safety policies and practices in the organisation to ensure that aspects of the psychosocial work environment are being properly implemented, managed, and monitored, to ensure that individuals’ health and well‐being are not at risk.

Originality/value

The paper represents a first attempt to investigate the roles of positive and negative emotions in the justicehealth relationship in a different cultural context such as the Caribbean. Justice has been rarely researched as a psychosocial work stressor. The study described in the paper focused on multiple health outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Daria Lupsa, Loreni Baciu and Delia Virga

This study is based on job demands-resources model and the conservation of resources theory explores the roleof psychological capital (PsyCap), as a personal resource, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is based on job demands-resources model and the conservation of resources theory explores the roleof psychological capital (PsyCap), as a personal resource, and organizational justice (distributive and procedural), as a contextual resource, in enhancing health through work engagement. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 193 Romanian social workers (87.60 percent women) from the national network was used to test two structural models.

Findings

Structural equation modeling analysis revealed that work engagement partially mediates the relationship between PsyCap and health, and work engagement totally mediates the relationship between organizational justice and health.

Research limitations/implications

The results emphasize the role of resources, PsyCap and organizational justice, in protecting the social workers’ health.

Practical implications

These findings support the necessity of combined evidence-based programs to develop social worker’s PsyCap and to maintain the optimum level of perceived organizational justice. These intervention programs can, in turn, enhance the work engagement and protect the health of employees in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study indicates a novel conceptual model that has two simultaneous predictors of work engagement and health. It provides insights into how contextual resources (organizational justice) potentiate the effect of personal resources (PsyCap) in enhancing health.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Sumita Rai

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of organizational justice on employees’ mental health. This paper is also an attempt to understand the moderating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of organizational justice on employees’ mental health. This paper is also an attempt to understand the moderating role of organizational identification on organizational justice and employee mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Standard questionnaires were used to collect data. A survey study was conducted in two multinational companies located in northern and southern part of India. The sample size of the study was 321.

Findings

The result of hierarchical regression highlights that distributive and interactional justice were significantly correlated with employee mental health with positive interaction effect in the case of strong identification. Moderating effect of organizational identification on mental health and organizational justice was also found significant.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical development from this paper will contribute to organizational justice research presenting its impact on employee mental health. The moderating effect of organizational identification will bring a new dimension to understand the relationship of organizational justice and mental health.

Practical implications

This study will provide insight to practicing manager to reinforce organizational justice practices at workplace. This will also help manager and leader to understand the identification level of employee with organization, and its impact on mental health.

Originality/value

This paper explores all the three forms of organizational justice as antecedents. It also studied employee mental health as consequence and the role of organizational identification as moderator on justice and mental health.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

John Rodwell and Andre Gulyas

Allied health professionals are vital for effective healthcare yet there are continuing shortages of these employees. Building on work with other healthcare professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

Allied health professionals are vital for effective healthcare yet there are continuing shortages of these employees. Building on work with other healthcare professionals, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of psychological contract (PC) breach and types of organisational justice on variables important to retention among allied health professionals: mental health and organisational commitment. The potential effects of justice on the negative outcomes of breach were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple regressions analysed data from 113 allied health professionals working in a medium-large Australian healthcare organisation.

Findings

The main negative impacts on respondents’ mental health and commitment were from high PC breach, low procedural and distributive justice and less respectful treatment from organisational representatives. The interaction between procedural justice and breach illustrates that breach may be forgivable if processes are fair. Surprisingly, a betrayal or “aggravated breach effect” may occur after a breach when interpersonal justice is high. Further, negative affectivity was negatively related to respondents’ mental health (affective outcomes) but not commitment (work-related attitude).

Practical implications

Healthcare organisations should ensure the fairness of decisions and avoid breaking promises within their control. If promises cannot reasonably be kept, transparency of processes behind the breach may allow allied health professionals to understand that the organisation did not purposefully fail to fulfil expectations.

Originality/value

This study offers insights into how breach and four types of justice interact to influence employee mental health and work attitudes among allied health professionals.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Beth St. Jean, Paul T. Jaeger, Gagan Jindal and Yuting Liao

This chapter introduces the focus of this volume – the many ways in which libraries and librarians are helping to increase people’s health literacy and reduce health

Abstract

This chapter introduces the focus of this volume – the many ways in which libraries and librarians are helping to increase people’s health literacy and reduce health disparities in their communities. The rampant and rapidly increasing health injustices that occur every day throughout the world are, in large part, caused and exacerbated by health information injustice – something which libraries and librarians are playing an instrumental role in addressing by ensuring the physical and intellectual accessibility of information for all. This chapter opens with an introduction to the central concepts of health justice and health information injustice, focusing on the many information-related factors that shape the degree to which individuals have the information they need to be able to have a sufficient and truly equitable chance to live a long and healthy life. Next, the authors present a timely case study to emphasize the importance of health information justice, looking at the dire importance of health literacy as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors then provide a brief glimpse into their 13 contributed chapters, grouped into five categories: (1) Public Libraries/Healthy Communities; (2) Health Information Assessment; (3) Overcoming Barriers to Health Information Access; (4) Serving Disadvantaged Populations; and (5) Health Information as a Communal Asset. In conclusion, the authors discuss their aims for this volume, particularly that readers will become more aware of librarians’ efforts to address health disparities in their communities and excited about participating in and expanding these efforts, moving us closer to health justice.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Lia Metzger, Cyrus Ahalt, Margot Kushel, Alissa Riker and Brie Williams

The rapidly increasing number of older adults cycling through local criminal justice systems (jails, probation, and parole) suggests a need for greater collaboration among…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapidly increasing number of older adults cycling through local criminal justice systems (jails, probation, and parole) suggests a need for greater collaboration among a diverse group of local stakeholders including professionals from healthcare delivery, public health, and criminal justice and directly affected individuals, their families, and advocates. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework that local communities can use to understand and begin to address the needs of criminal justice-involved older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework included solicit input from community stakeholders to identify pressing challenges facing criminal justice-involved older adults, conduct needs assessments of criminal justice-involved older adults and professionals working with them; implement quick-response interventions based on needs assessments; share findings with community stakeholders and generate public feedback; engage interdisciplinary group to develop an action plan to optimize services.

Findings

A five-step framework for creating an interdisciplinary community response is an effective approach to action planning and broad stakeholder engagement on behalf of older adults cycling through the criminal justice system.

Originality/value

This study proposes the Criminal Justice Involved Older Adults in Need of Treatment Initiative Framework for establishing an interdisciplinary community response to the growing population of medically and socially vulnerable criminal justice-involved older adults.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Max Rutherford

Imprisonment for public protection (IPP) has been the subject of much attention and some controversy since its implementation in April 2005. High numbers of IPP prisoners…

Abstract

Imprisonment for public protection (IPP) has been the subject of much attention and some controversy since its implementation in April 2005. High numbers of IPP prisoners, combined with a low release rate, have meant that IPP has had a significant impact on the prison population. This paper charts the genesis of IPP and its historical antecedents. It also explores IPP as an exemplar of the ‘rise of risk’ and focuses on its links to the ‘dangerous severe personality disorder’ pilots. It presents two hypotheses on the mental health implications of IPP.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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