Search results

1 – 10 of over 45000
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Maria Karanika‐Murray and Andrew K. Weyman

The purpose of this paper is to discuss contemporary approaches to workplace health and well‐being, articulating key differences in the intervention architecture between…

1479

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss contemporary approaches to workplace health and well‐being, articulating key differences in the intervention architecture between public and workplace health contexts and implications for intervention design.

Design/methodology/approach

Contemporary practice is discussed in light of calls for a paradigm shift in occupational health from a treatment orientation to an holistic approach focused on mitigation of the causes of ill health and the promotion of well‐being. In practice, relatively few organizations have or seem able to engage with a broader perspective that encompasses challenges to health and well‐being associated with contextual organizational drivers, e.g. job design/role, workload, systems of reward, leadership style and the underpinning climate. Drawing upon insights from public health and the workplace safety tradition, the scope for broadening the perspective on intervention (in terms of vectors of harm addressed, theory of change and intervention logic) is discussed.

Findings

There are important differences in scope and options for intervention between public health and workplace health contexts. While there is scope to emulate public health practice, this should not constrain thinking over intervention opinions. Increased awareness of these key differences within work organizations, and an evidence‐based epidemiological approach to learning has the potential to strengthen and broaden the approach to workplace health and well‐being management.

Originality/value

The authors argue that approaches to workplace well‐being interventions that selectively cross‐fertilise and adapt elements of public health interventions offer promise for realising a broader change agenda and for building inherently healthy workplaces.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Marjorita Sormunen, Terhi Saaranen, Kerttu Tossavainen and Hannele Turunen

This paper aims to present the process evaluation for a two‐year (2008‐2010) participatory action research project focusing on home‐school partnership in health learning…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the process evaluation for a two‐year (2008‐2010) participatory action research project focusing on home‐school partnership in health learning, undertaken within the Schools for Health in Europe (SHE) in Eastern Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

Two intervention schools and two control schools (grade 5 pupils, parents, and selected school personnel) participated in a study. Process evaluation data were collected from intervention schools after 10 months of participation, by interviewing two classroom teachers and three families. In addition, program documents and relevant statistics were collected from schools during the intervention.

Findings

Teachers' opinions on the development process varied from more concrete expectations (School A teacher) to overall satisfaction to implementation (School B teacher). Parents believed that their children would benefit from the project later in life. The context and differences of the school environments were likely to affect the development process at the school level.

Research limitations/implications

This paper demonstrates a process evaluation in two schools and, therefore, limits the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The process evaluation was an essential part of this intervention study and may provide a useful structure and an example for process evaluation for future school‐based health intervention studies.

Originality/value

This study highlights the importance of planning the process evaluation structure before the start of the intervention, brings out the relevance of systematically assessing the process while it is ongoing, and illustrates process evaluation in an action research project.

Details

Health Education, vol. 112 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Coosje Hammink, Nienke Moor and Masi Mohammadi

This systematic literature review focusses on original research that examines the effect of persuasive architectural interventions on stimulating health behaviour. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This systematic literature review focusses on original research that examines the effect of persuasive architectural interventions on stimulating health behaviour. This paper gives an overview of the empirical evidence and aims to examine the evidence for health behaviour change through architectural interventions and the underlying theoretical pathways and mechanisms using social cognitive theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviewed 40 peer-reviewed articles found through Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science, PubMed and a supplementary hand search and examined for effect, type of interventions, type of behaviour and underlying mechanisms using social cognitive theory.

Findings

This review shows that architectural interventions can stimulate healthy behaviour. However, much of the research focusses on specific health behaviours (physical activity), in specific target groups (children or older adults) and with specific types of interventions (supplying provisions). Furthermore, the effect of the physical environment on cognitive factors should be taken into consideration.

Research limitations/implications

Hardly any research on smart architectural interventions for health behaviour change exists, but combining insights from product design and built environment has the potential to impact designing for health behaviour change.

Originality/value

Stimulating certain types of health behaviour can positively contribute to health goals and has been the focus of many health promotion practitioners over the years. The focus of health promotion interventions has primarily been on social and psychological factors. However, current research shows the importance of the physical environment as an influence on health behaviour. Potentially, with the use of smart technology, this effect could be enhanced.

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2014

Hannah Dale, Linsay Brassington and Kristel King

There is growing evidence that health behaviour change interventions are associated with mental health and wellbeing improvements. This paper aims to examine the effect of…

6416

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing evidence that health behaviour change interventions are associated with mental health and wellbeing improvements. This paper aims to examine the effect of healthy lifestyle interventions on mental wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

Six databases (Medline, Evidence Based Medicine Cochrane Registered Controlled Trials, Evidence Based Medicine Full Text Reviews, British Nursing Index, Embase, PsycINFO) were searched from database commencement up to April 2013. A broad focus on lifestyle interventions and mental health and wellbeing outcomes was chosen. Papers were systematically extracted by title then abstract according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria: any individual population (non-couple/family); any health behaviour change interventions; mental health and wellbeing outcomes; and a one-two level of evidence. Interventions aimed at workers were excluded, as were articles assessing cognitive functioning rather than mental health or wellbeing, or those using medications in interventions.

Findings

Two authors reviewed 95 full papers. In total, 29 papers met inclusion criteria, representing a range of interventions spanning physical activity, diet, alcohol intake, drug use and smoking. A range of measures were used. The majority (n=25) of studies demonstrated improvements on at least one indicator of mental health and wellbeing. Limitations include the broad range of outcome measures used, varied follow-up times and the lack of detail in reporting interventions.

Originality/value

Health behaviour change interventions targeting physical outcomes appear to have benefits to mental health and wellbeing spanning healthy populations and those with physical or mental health problems. Evidence is strongest for interventions targeting exercise and diet, particularly in combination and the actual lifestyle changes made and adherence appear to be important. However, it is not clear from this review which specific components are necessary or essential for improvements in mental health and wellbeing.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2022

Maedeh Ghorbanian Zolbin, Isto Huvila and Shahrokh Nikou

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationship between elderly people's health literacy skills and those people's decision to make use of digital health service…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationship between elderly people's health literacy skills and those people's decision to make use of digital health service platforms. Despite the substantial influence of digitisation on the delivery of healthcare services, understanding how health intervention strategies might help empower elderly people's health literacy skills is critical.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses the existing trends in research on the convergence of health literacy, health intervention programmes and digital health service platforms by reviewing 34 studies published between 2000 and 2020.

Findings

The findings of the review indicate three primary themes (health literacy skills, health management competency and attitude/confidence), which provide a summary of the current literature, and in all three the results show that health intervention programmes help to enhance health literacy skills of elderly people. Based on the review results and by organising the fragmented status quo of health intervention research, the authors develop a comprehensive research model and identify future research directions for research in this domain.

Practical implications

The findings will be useful to health professionals in two ways: (1) the findings provide practical information about the growing need to implement health literacy intervention programmes to satisfy elderly people's appetite for accessing health services due to cognitive and physiological impairments, and (2) the finding help them to understand that with digital health platforms, elderly people have quicker access to health services, improving the quality of care provided to them.

Originality/value

This paper presents a comprehensive research model for analysing the impact of health literacy skills on older people's ability and intention to access digital health information sources, considering various health intervention approaches.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Valentina Baltag and Chiara Servili

Mental health problems make a significant contribution to morbidity and mortality in adolescents worldwide. To address mental health in adolescents policy response should…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health problems make a significant contribution to morbidity and mortality in adolescents worldwide. To address mental health in adolescents policy response should intertwine the life course approach and the ecological model that positions adolescents in the context of multifactorial influences. The purpose of this paper is to describe policy response at four levels: multisector policies and interventions, health systems policies and interventions, evidence-based clinical interventions and actions to monitor progress. It aims to analyse the implications for adolescent mental health of key recent global commitments including the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health.

Design/methodology/approach

Multisector policies and interventions on determinants of adolescent mental health and well-being are drawn from the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health. Key health systems actions are derived from the Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan (2013-2020). In both cases, policies and interventions are made specific for provisions relevant to adolescents. Examples of implementation of policies and interventions are drawn from a World Health Organization (WHO) review of national policy documents found in WHO MiNDbank. A list of indicators to monitor progress is being proposed based on Mental Health Atlas and WHO indicators for adolescent health.

Findings

With some notable exceptions, the mental health of adolescents is not adequately addressed by national health policies. There is a considerable body of evidence on the effectiveness of policies and interventions, and recent global commitments give new hope for promoting adolescent mental health through a multisectoral response, within which the health sector has an important role to play. Global reporting mechanisms, including the Mental Health Atlas, should be “adolescent-sensitive”, meaning that adolescent specific impact, outcomes, inputs and determinants should be measured, reported and acted upon.

Originality/value

This paper analyses the meaning specific to adolescents in the policies and interventions promoted in the SDGs, the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health and the Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan (2013-2020). For the first time a four-levels policy response specific to adolescent mental health is put together: multisector policies and interventions, health systems policies and interventions, evidence-based clinical interventions and actions to monitor progress.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Emily B. Peterson, Xiaoquan Zhao, Xiaomei Cai and Kyeung Mi Oh

Purpose: The public health burden caused by tobacco is heavy among first-generation Chinese immigrant men whose home country has significantly higher smoking rates than

Abstract

Purpose: The public health burden caused by tobacco is heavy among first-generation Chinese immigrant men whose home country has significantly higher smoking rates than the United States. The current study is part of a larger effort to pilot an mHealth tobacco cessation intervention using MMS (graphic) mobile phone technologies to target East Asian immigrant populations. Grounded in the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM), our specific aims were to determine what message themes, level of graphic intensity, and types of efficacy information are most appropriate and useful for mHealth interventions targeting this population.

Methodology/Approach: A qualitative study utilizing a series of focus groups (k = 5) was conducted with male adult smokers who were born in China and currently reside in the United States. The primary aim of the focus groups was to solicit reactions to a series of preliminary messages developed by the research team. A secondary aim was to gauge receptivity to the use of MMS as a vehicle for smoking cessation intervention. Participants (n = 32) were recruited from local Chinese communities in a large Mid-Atlantic metropolitan area.

Findings: Opinions about different message strategies were mixed. However, participants tended to rate messages more positively when they focused on the impact of smoking on family and loved ones, particularly children. Messages with fear-arousing images were also perceived to be effective at low frequency of exposure, but there were concerns that they may backfire at high exposure. Awareness of and interest in Quitline were low, and concrete quitting tips were perceived as more effective. Participants reported a preference for receiving messages a few times a week, and an MMS message platform was generally preferred to WeChat (a Chinese social media platform).

Implications: Our results suggest that graphic MMS messaging holds promise as an effective intervention method for this population and that EPPM is an appropriate framework to develop, test, and analyze mHealth intervention messages. While messages that focused primarily on impact on children, health, and specific quitting tips were generally found to be more effective, a mix of different types of messages that address a wide range of issues may be most appropriate for this population.

Originality/Value: This study is the first to explore the utility of graphic text messaging as an intervention method to promote smoking cessation among male Chinese immigrants. Findings from the study provide important insights for future intervention work targeting this underserved population.

Details

eHealth: Current Evidence, Promises, Perils and Future Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-322-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Adam J. Vanhove, Tiffany Brutus and Kristin A. Sowden

In recent years, a wide range of psychosocial health interventions have been implemented among military service members and their families. However, there are questions…

Abstract

In recent years, a wide range of psychosocial health interventions have been implemented among military service members and their families. However, there are questions over the evaluative rigor of these interventions. We conducted a systematic review of this literature, rating each relevant study (k = 111) on five evaluative rigor scales (type of control group, approach to participant assignment, outcome quality, number of measurement time points, and follow-up distality). The most frequently coded values on three of the five scales (control group type, participant assignment, and follow-up distality) were those indicating the lowest level of operationally defined rigor. Logistic regression results indicate that the evaluative rigor of intervention studies has largely remained consistent over time, with exceptions indicating that rigor has decreased. Analyses among seven military sub-populations indicate that interventions conducted among soldiers completing basic training, soldiers returning from combat deployment, and combat veterans have had, on average, the greatest evaluative rigor. However, variability in mean scores across evaluative rigor scales within sub-populations highlights the unique methodological hurdles common to different military settings. Recommendations for better standardizing the intervention evaluation process are discussed.

Details

Occupational Stress and Well-Being in Military Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-184-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

K.K. Pucher, N.M.W.M. Boot and N.K. De Vries

A systematic review of effects and mediators was conducted to determine whether school health promotion interventions (SHPIs) can enhance children's academic performance (AP).

5836

Abstract

Purpose

A systematic review of effects and mediators was conducted to determine whether school health promotion interventions (SHPIs) can enhance children's academic performance (AP).

Design/methodology/approach

PubMed and PsycINFO database searches and subsequent reference list reviews were conducted for papers published before 18 January 2012 with a standard form of eligibility criteria encompassing standardized measures of AP (e.g. grade‐point averages, end of year marks) and methodology sound studies (e.g. randomized controlled trials, cross‐over controlled trials, quasi‐experimental designs with pre‐ and posttest) of interventions addressing healthy lifestyles in the general school population. Information for the study description was extracted from the original article (e.g. country, study purpose, research design, effects on AP measures, components of Health Promoting School, author's explanations for observed effects). Effect sizes were calculated for effects on AP measures.

Findings

Remaining SHPIs targeted exclusively the maintenance of energy balance (physical activity (PA) and nutrition) and had small to large positive effects on AP; no negative effects were reported. Effects of different kinds of interventions varied across academic domains. One PA intervention reported large effects of vigorous activity on mathematics; another PA intervention had small to medium impact on language scores. Small to medium effects were found for interventions combining nutrition and PA elements; one affected mathematics and another both mathematics and language scores. Slight improvements in language scores were observed for breakfast provision in schools.

Limitations

The small number of interventions, little homogeneity in intervention components (content, length and measurement instruments), reporting bias and some inconsistent results should be considered when interpreting our results. Our review did not allow definite conclusions concerning mechanisms responsible for effects of SHPIs on AP.

Practical implications

Planned development of school health promotion will need to be based on evidence. Measures of AP should be included in evaluations of SHPIs. Schools and health professionals should be made aware of the importance of these measures.

Originality/value

We provide evidence that SHPIs promoting energy balance can affect AP, also if they do not target children at risk or with specific symptoms, nor employ elements directly connected to school education.

Details

Health Education, vol. 113 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 October 2017

Camilla Lawaetz Wimmelmann, Kathrine Vitus and Signe Smith Jervelund

The purpose of this paper is to examine any unanticipated effects of an educational intervention among newly arrived adult immigrants attending a language school in Denmark.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine any unanticipated effects of an educational intervention among newly arrived adult immigrants attending a language school in Denmark.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study was conducted including interviews with nine informants, observations of two complete intervention courses and an analysis of the official intervention documents.

Findings

This case study exemplifies how the basic normative assumptions behind an immigrant-oriented intervention and the intrinsic power relations therein may be challenged and negotiated by the participants. In particular, the assumed (power) relations inherent in immigrant-oriented educational health interventions, in which immigrants are in a novice position, are challenged, as the immigrants are experienced adults (and parents) in regard to healthcare. The paper proposes that such unexpected conditions for the implementation – different from the assumed conditions – not only challenge the implementation of the intervention but also potentially produce unanticipated yet valuable effects.

Research limitations/implications

Newly arrived immigrants represent a hugely diverse and heterogeneous group of people with differing values and belief systems regarding health and healthcare. A more detailed study is necessary to fully understand their health seeking behaviours in the Danish context.

Originality/value

Offering newly arrived immigrants a course on health and the healthcare system as part of the mandatory language courses is a new and underexplored means of providing and improving newly arrived immigrants knowledge and use of the Danish healthcare system.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 45000