Search results

1 – 10 of 312
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Felix Amoah, Laetitia Radder and Marlé van Eyk

Globally, guesthouses provide an important source of accommodation to visitors and tourists. Surprisingly, research into this sector is rather sparse. The purpose of this…

Downloads
1511

Abstract

Purpose

Globally, guesthouses provide an important source of accommodation to visitors and tourists. Surprisingly, research into this sector is rather sparse. The purpose of this paper is to examine the dimensions of experience value, determine guests’ perceptions of experience value, analyse the influences of various profile variables on experience value, and investigate the relationship between experience value, satisfaction, and customer behavioural intentions regarding guesthouses in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research design was followed. A total of 541 useable questionnaires were received from 650 guests conveniently selected from 51 guesthouses in Ghana. The guesthouses were selected by means of stratified random sampling.

Findings

The results of the study reveal that atmospherics, enjoyment, entertainment, escape, efficiency, excellence and economic value measure guests’ perceptions of experience value. Atmospherics and economic value attracted the highest positive rating while escape had the most negative rating. In addition, the study showed that there is a strong positive relationship between experience value, satisfaction and behavioural intention.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation relates to the sample. Only the major city from each of four regions was selected for the study. These regions include Accra, Koforidua, Cape Coast and Kumasi. Future research should investigate perceived value provided by guesthouses in the remaining six regions of the country in the quest to generalise the findings. Lastly, the study derived the experience value dimensions from the literature and verified these. While this is not regarded as a limitation, future research could investigate further dimensions of experience value such as novelty, nostalgia and social interaction.

Practical implications

Guesthouse managers could use the outcome of this study as a form of differentiation. Second, managers should take note of the positive relationships between experience value, satisfaction and respondents’ intentions to return to the guesthouse and tell others about their experiences (behavioural intentions). This can strengthen the organisation’s competitive position within the accommodation industry. Finally, the research resulted in a fairly simple instrument guesthouse managers can use to assess their guests’ perceptions of value provided by the guesthouse. It is recommended that guesthouse managers measure guests’ perceptions of value on a regular basis.

Originality/value

Theoretical implications and recommendations following the empirical findings and recommendations are provided. First, defining the concept of value is complex. While the underlying foundation of value as benefits relative to sacrifices (Zeithaml, 1988) remains relevant, affective forms of value should also be considered. This suggests that organisations that focus only on providing benefits may be at a competitive disadvantage. Second, experience value is multidimensional. Seven dimensions, namely atmospherics, enjoyment, entertainment, escape, efficiency, excellence and economic value were shown to contribute to the guesthouse experience. These included emotional factors in addition to the conventional functional factors.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Fatemeh Fehrest, Bahram Nekouie Sadry and Fatemeh Sepehr Pour

This research is to identify how user-generated contents (UGC) affect a pre-trip decision on the booking of a guesthouse among international travelers. Online surveys are…

Abstract

This research is to identify how user-generated contents (UGC) affect a pre-trip decision on the booking of a guesthouse among international travelers. Online surveys are conducted among social network users who have booked an ecolodge in the past year. A snowball sampling is used, which posts a questionnaire link in social networks including Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram in addition to travel blogs. This study indicates a positive relationship between UGC and lodging selection. UGC is considered as a significant predictor of booking an environmentally friendly guesthouse. Among the UGCs, travelers' review is the most important one influencing guesthouse selection. Future studies may focus on other IT potentials such as “Gamification” or other types of content such as “Podcasts” or “live videos” to engage independent travelers.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-385-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

S. Mostafa Rasoolimanesh, Mohmmad Iranmanesh, Muslim Amin, Kashif Hussain, Mastura Jaafar and Hamid Ataeishad

This study aims to examine the interrelationships between the dimensions of perceived value, including functional, emotional and social values. The mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the interrelationships between the dimensions of perceived value, including functional, emotional and social values. The mediating role of emotional value between functional and social values and satisfaction have been hypothesized and tested. In addition, this study examines the moderating role of social value for the effect of emotional value on satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected from guests staying at two traditional guesthouses in Kashan, Iran. The authors applied partial least squares structural equation modeling to analyze 316 questionnaires completed by participants and for hypotheses testing.

Findings

The authors found positive and direct effects of all dimensions of perceived value on satisfaction. Moreover, the results indicated positive and significant indirect effects for functional and social values on satisfaction through emotional value. The findings demonstrated positive and strong effects of functional and social values on emotional value. The results do not support a moderating role for social value on the relationship between emotional value and satisfaction. In addition, the findings showed a strong and positive effect for satisfaction on revisit intentions.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique theoretical contribution to the perceived value literature by investigating the interrelationships between dimensions of perceived value. Moreover, this study explores several practical implications of these findings.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Roger J. Callan

Examines the development of the hotel grading scheme for the islandof Jersey. A brief history of Jersey hotel grading leads to the need fora new scheme and why an…

Abstract

Examines the development of the hotel grading scheme for the island of Jersey. A brief history of Jersey hotel grading leads to the need for a new scheme and why an independent route was taken rather than joining the mainland Tourist Board′s Crown scheme. An outline of the development and form of the new scheme is provided along with an explanation of its operation. The idiosyncrasies of operating an island hotel scheme are examined, indicating the need for an individual approach to the solving of hotel registration and grading difficulties.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Sally Reynolds

One of the outcomes of European collaboration in the development of social firms has been the establishment of a network of businesses in the tourism sector called Access…

Abstract

One of the outcomes of European collaboration in the development of social firms has been the establishment of a network of businesses in the tourism sector called Access Tourism. These businesses range from hotels and guesthouses to travel agencies and package tour operators, all operating in a highly competitive market and aiming to provide the public with the highest standards of service. However, as well as employing disabled people, these businesses also have a social mission ‐ to make tourism accessible for people with special needs. One member of the network is Lyndhurst Guesthouse in the Lake District and a party of service users from Surrey decided to give it a try. Sally Reynolds describes the project and the team give their verdict.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Daphne Gondhalekar, Adris Akhtar, Pascal Keilmann, Jenny Kebschull, Sven Nussbaum, Sonam Dawa, Phuntsok Namgyal, Lobzang Tsultim, Tsering Phuntsog, Stanzin Dorje, Tsering Mutup and Phunchok Namgail

This chapter studies the link between urban planning and health. Access to safe drinking water is already a very serious issue for large urban populations in fast-growing…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter studies the link between urban planning and health. Access to safe drinking water is already a very serious issue for large urban populations in fast-growing economies such as India. Water availability is further being impacted by climate change, leading to the drastically increased spread of water-related diseases.

Design/methodology/approach

Leh Town, which is located in an ecologically vulnerable semi-arid region of the Himalayas in Ladakh, has been considered for this study because it is undergoing large-scale transformation due to rapid growth in its tourism industry. In 2012–2013 our interdisciplinary group comprising researchers from Germany and India conducted field surveys, including geographic information system-based (GIS) mapping of point sources of water pollution, questionnaire surveys of 200 households and 70 hotels and guesthouses and semi-structured interviews. We also reviewed secondary medical data.

Findings

We found that diarrhoeal incidence has increased in the local population in Leh in the past decade, which may be linked to water pollution: Further, we found that rapidly increasing water consumption coupled with a lack of adequate water and sanitation infrastructure is causing serious water pollution.

Research limitations/implications

Further, data is needed for causal connections between water pollution and health impacts to be conclusively drawn.

Practical implications

This study discusses the use of GIS to support a call for the need for more integrated urban planning and decision-making that holistically addresses water and health challenges in Leh and advocates the development of a decentralized or hybrid sanitation system to support water resources conservation as a central dimension of an integrated health management approach.

Social implications

GIS is also a very useful platform for supporting participatory urban planning in Leh.

Originality/value

With such an integrated urban planning approach, Leh would be a lighthouse example for other towns in the region.

Details

Ecological Health: Society, Ecology and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-323-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Dave Crick, Shiv Chaudhry and James M. Crick

The purpose of this study is to investigate the need for an evolving business model that accounts for social, as well as business-related risks/rewards considerations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the need for an evolving business model that accounts for social, as well as business-related risks/rewards considerations, that is, for owner-managers with lifestyle as opposed to growth-oriented objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach undertaken involved in-depth interviews with the firm’s owner-managers, supplemental interviews with members of staff, observation, plus examining documents from secondary sources. Data gathering involved a period of three years to account for an evolving business model over time.

Findings

The findings from an instrumental case study demonstrate the need to adapt a firm’s business model in the light of changing circumstances. Additionally, in the context of owner-managers with lifestyle as opposed to growth-oriented objectives, to account for social in addition to business-related considerations in planning activities.

Originality/value

The originality of the study is to incorporate a longitudinal case study in to the entrepreneurial marketing literature. Specifically, this offers implications for business support organisations that advise prospective owner-managers; that is, in respect of the need for effective planning in formulating an evolving and enduring business model. Implications also highlight in a business sense, that turnaround of a poorly performing firm may be possible, for example, to overcome initial inadequate marketing planning. However, for owner-managers with lifestyle as opposed to growth-oriented objectives, a combination of both business and social factors need consideration to maintain a work/life balance. A venture that relies on personal and business relationships may not be viable if the partners cannot work together, no matter if the venture is performing well.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Dave Crick

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in…

Downloads
2679

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in the UK tourism industry. The first business had to be closed down despite the partners employing turnaround strategies to recover from a lack of planning, since an effective work/life balance was not achieved; the second has proved to be more successful due to entrepreneurial learning in overcoming earlier errors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved multiple in‐depth interviews with the key business owner and his partners in the two respective businesses together with supplementary interviews with staff and viewing documentation for triangulation purposes.

Findings

The findings based on a longitudinal case history suggest that some enterprising individuals may learn from certain past mistakes but could still need others to support particular business practices for them to succeed. The results also suggest that, even if a badly performing business can be turned around, owner/managers must be aware of the potential social costs that can be incurred in implementing strategies. As such, it demonstrates the need to learn from experiences and plan for social as well as work‐related issues to maintain a work/life balance, particularly in a “lifestyle” business.

Practical implications

The implications of the findings suggest that advisors (including university teaching) involved with assisting entrepreneurs make them aware of the need for effective planning. In particular, that the widely reported hard work and long hours involved in running a business can take a toll on personal lives and the work/life balance of enterprising individuals must be managed.

Originality/value

The main aspect of originality of the paper comes from the study of social costs of running an entrepreneurial venture, but the longitudinal nature of the study provides a further aspect of originality in this field of research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Justin Craig and Noel J. Lindsay

This research furthers our understanding of the interaction between the fields of entrepreneurship and family business. It presents a framework that introduces the family…

Downloads
5631

Abstract

This research furthers our understanding of the interaction between the fields of entrepreneurship and family business. It presents a framework that introduces the family dynamic to Timmons’ driving forces model of entrepreneurship. The framework highlights the influence of the family in the entrepreneurship process and the importance of the fit among the three driving forces and the family. It highlights the importance of, and the pivotal roles played by, outside boards of directors when entrepreneurial activities are undertaken by family businesses. Using extracts from interviews with family and non‐family executives and board members, the research employs a single case study that describes an actual series of events to provide a practical application of the theory.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Hadyn Ingram

States that the development of classification and grading schemes for hotels and other accommodation in the UK is an important activity which affects customers and…

Downloads
5745

Abstract

States that the development of classification and grading schemes for hotels and other accommodation in the UK is an important activity which affects customers and practitioners alike. In the light of evidence of a low take‐up of the English Tourist Board (ETB) Crown Classification system, reviews some of the major issues in developing an effective hotel classification system and reports feedback from the perspective of properties of bed and breakfast operations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

1 – 10 of 312