Search results

1 – 10 of over 15000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Taewoo Nam

The purpose of this paper is to identify individual level perception-based determinants influencing participation in government innovation and to examine the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify individual level perception-based determinants influencing participation in government innovation and to examine the moderating effect of innovation cynicism upon those determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing on the case of Government 3.0, a Korean National Government innovation initiative, this study analyzes survey data regarding local public employee perceptions of the initiative through ordered logistic regression.

Findings

Multiple theoretical correlates of perceived desirability, perceived efficacy, performance expectancy, facilitating leadership, peer influence and demonstrable symbols have positive influences on participation in Government 3.0. Surprisingly, cynics of government innovation reported more active participation in Government 3.0 than non-cynics. While cynicism negatively moderates the influence of perceived desirability, performance expectancy and peer influence on Government 3.0 participation, the expected negative moderating effect does not correspond with the influence of perceived efficacy on innovation participation.

Originality/value

The study highlights the importance of innovation cynics, who are probably neither skeptics nor pessimists regarding recent changes but rather are concerned about recurring rhetoric and poor performance of government innovation.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2011

Gary M. Shiffman and Prabin B. Khadka

This chapter focuses on the Maoist insurgency in the 75 districts of Nepal and tries to analyze the insurgency in a comparative perspective. We compare the 75 districts…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the Maoist insurgency in the 75 districts of Nepal and tries to analyze the insurgency in a comparative perspective. We compare the 75 districts with the aim to address the following questions: Why does an insurgency emerge in certain areas? How is it linked to economic, social, or political factors? Why does an insurgency show a robust presence in some districts but fail to do likewise in others? We attempt to answer these questions by conducting multivariate regressions using longitudinal data to test our primary hypothesis that the onset of an insurgency and the continuation are functions of the same factors. We examine insurgency within one country, Nepal, and test our model in Nepal's 75 districts, in a single country context, using available data on the 10-year-long insurgency. We break down the Nepalese insurgency into two parts: the onset and the continuation. Our findings indicate that regions predominantly polarized by caste are more prone to the onset of insurgency than any other factor. Higher literacy rate, a proxy for government efficacy, renders insurgency less feasible, and difficult terrain has no impact whatsoever. However, after the onset, many of the explanatory variables are no longer significant for the continuation of the insurgency and grievances alone tend to be meaningless.

Details

Ethnic Conflict, Civil War and Cost of Conflict
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-131-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Jonathan Spiteri and Marie Briguglio

This study looked at the relationship between good governance and trust in government. We used data on government trust across a sample of 29 European countries over the…

Abstract

This study looked at the relationship between good governance and trust in government. We used data on government trust across a sample of 29 European countries over the period 2004–2015, as well as six different aspects of governance as captured by the Worldwide Governance Indicators. We also consider GDP growth and income inequality and their correlation with trust in government. The results showed that voice and accountability, which captures freedom of expression and citizen involvement in the democratic process, was significantly related to government trust, across all specifications of our regression models. None of the other indicators yields significant results, although the coefficient for control of corruption is significant in some specifications. We also found that real GDP growth rates have a significant relationship with trust in government. A comparison of the standardised regression coefficients indicated that voice and accountability is a stronger correlate of trust in government than GDP growth. Therefore, our results suggested that good governance was a key determinant of trust in government, over and above economic considerations. We discussed the implications of these findings in light of declining levels of public trust in government around the world.

Details

Governance and Regulations’ Contemporary Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-815-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Daniel B. Klein

Individuals tend to seek out communities and organizations that appeal to their beliefs and values. They gravitate to positions and responsibilities that suit their…

Abstract

Individuals tend to seek out communities and organizations that appeal to their beliefs and values. They gravitate to positions and responsibilities that suit their personal aspirations and ambitions, and in such pursuits they succeed best. In The United States of Ambition: Politicians, Power, and the Pursuit of Office, Alan Ehrenhalt (1992) argues that the political process tends to select for those who most believe in it and make a career of it. He suggests that one advantage held by the Democratic party (over the Republican party) is that the Democratic party is more thoroughly a party of active government, so it better attracts “people who think running for office is worth the considerable sacrifice it entails” (p. 224). Not only does the political process tend to attract those who believe in it, it also tends to prosper believers.

Details

The Dynamics of Intervention: Regulation and Redistribution in the Mixed Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-053-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Yefei Yang, Antonio K.W. Lau, Peter K.C. Lee, Andy C.L. Yeung and T.C. Edwin Cheng

The Chinese Government encourages firms to diffuse their operational-level environmental management (EM) into their organization’s mission and strategy to develop…

Abstract

Purpose

The Chinese Government encourages firms to diffuse their operational-level environmental management (EM) into their organization’s mission and strategy to develop strategic EM to promote sustainable development. The purpose of this paper is to utilize two concepts of institutional theory (isomorphic pressures and decoupling behavior) to assess how different institutional forces arising from Chinese macro-level factors (market pressure, business turbulence, legal voids, carbon policy, structural-level governmental interference and guanxi with government) influence the efficacy of strategic EM.

Design/methodology/approach

In partnership with a major consulting firm in China, the authors collect multi-informant survey data from 183 manufacturing firms drawn from a variety of industries for testing the hypotheses posited.

Findings

The efficacy of strategic EM in the sampled firms is confirmed by the positive association with environmental performance. The authors also find that the efficacy of strategic EM is weakened by market pressure, business turbulence and legal voids, whereas it is strengthened by structural-level governmental interference. However, carbon policy and guanxi with government do not impact it significantly.

Research limitations/implications

To extend the findings on the environmental importance of strategic EM, future research can develop and validate a management framework to guide the adoption of strategic EM. With regard to the four valid macro-level factors influencing the efficacy of strategic EM, future research can identify the reasons (e.g. conflict with corporate functions) behind them to aid manufacturers to mitigate their negative influence or enhance the positive influence on strategic EM.

Social implications

China’s Government and its manufacturers (or those sharing a similar institutional environment) can expand the scope of their EM efforts from operational-level EM practices to strategic EM. The findings on the valid macro-level factors have led to practical suggestions for government bodies and manufacturers to improve the efficacy of strategic EM adoption. Overall, the implications help achieve the higher levels of firm-level environmental performance and alleviate the global pollution problem.

Originality/value

A particular value of this work lies in the demonstration of combining institutional theory (organization decoupling, isomorphic pressures) with practical consideration such as guanxi with government in the particular institutional environment of China to help address an important and context-related problem, environmental performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Stuti Saxena

This paper aims to investigate the role of “perceived risks” in adopting mobile government (m-government) services in India.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of “perceived risks” in adopting mobile government (m-government) services in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceding that “privacy risks” are one of the major factors that influence the adoption of e-services, the impact of “perceived risks” alongside “social efficacy,” “influence” of significant others and “attitude” on the adoption of m-government services in India has been underlined here. Specifically, the study has been conducted with 311 actual m-government users and constructs have been derived from existing theories like Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) and Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Multiple regression analysis has been conducted to analyze the data focused on constructs as: Perceived Risks (PR), Influence (I), Self-efficacy (SE), Attitude (ATT) and Behavioral Intention to Adopt m-government services (BI).

Findings

Results show that while the respondents perceive that adoption of m-government services is risk-free and safe, there is no impact of the interpersonal relationships on m-government adoption. There is more inclination to adopt m-government services conceding that the respondents perceive that they have the self-efficacy to operate such services. M-government services are being tapped regularly by the respondents and there is more inclination to adopt m-government services among the public sector employees and self-employed respondents in comparison with the ones who are students or unemployed. In terms of age, those in the age group of 31–50 are more inclined to adopt m-government services in comparison with the rest.

Originality/value

Exploration of “perceived risks” and other factors has been less in the context of m-government studies. The present study fills the gap in two ways: first, it undertakes the investigation in a developing country conceding that empirical studies on m-government adoption are few in Indian context, and second, it throws light on the role of “adoption” of m-government services in contrast with the “use” of e-government services.

Details

foresight, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Stuti Saxena

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors which influence mobile government (m-government) services adoption in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors which influence mobile government (m-government) services adoption in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Adoption behavior of m-government services by 311 respondents is probed by using a multiple set of constructs drawn from technology acceptance model (TAM), unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), theory of planned behavior (TPB) and hierarchical regression analysis. Specifically, eight hypotheses were tested around constructs like Perceived Usefulness (PU), Perceived Ease of Use (EOU), Compatibility (COM), Trust (T), Influence (I), Self-Efficacy (SE), Facilitating Conditions (FC), Attitude (ATT) and Behavioral Intention to Adopt m-government services (BI).

Findings

Results show that PU, EOU, T and ATT were found to have significant influence on the adoption of m-government services. Furthermore, demographic variables (age, marital status, occupation, educational qualification and frequency of using m-government services) were not found to be significant predictors for the adoption of m-government services in India.

Originality/value

While most of the technology adoption studies are focused on commercial activities, studies on internet interfaces vis-à-vis the public services are limited to investigation of e-government services. Besides, there are more studies contextualized in the developed countries as compared to developing countries. Academic research on m-government adoption is scant and the present paper is a significant contribution in the Indian context.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Haya Ajjan, William F. Crittenden and Amaleya Goneos-Malka

South Africa is one of the most unequal societies in the world with women substantially less likely to be economically active than men. This chapter draws from the theory…

Abstract

South Africa is one of the most unequal societies in the world with women substantially less likely to be economically active than men. This chapter draws from the theory of planned behavior to examine the enablers and barriers to entrepreneurship in South Africa. Specifically, we examine how attitude toward entrepreneurship, subjective norms in the South African collectivist culture, and behavioral controls of resources influence women’s intentions to start a business. Based on interviews with two successful women entrepreneurs in South Africa, we highlight the key role that government, self-efficacy, and technology-based platforms can have in establishing women’s entrepreneurial intentions.

Details

Go-to-Market Strategies for Women Entrepreneurs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-289-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Lisa Jane Callagher, Peter Smith and Saskia Ruscoe

Interest in venture capital markets continues to be of relevance to politicians and policy makers, recognizing the importance of government participation in venture…

Abstract

Purpose

Interest in venture capital markets continues to be of relevance to politicians and policy makers, recognizing the importance of government participation in venture capital market development. Yet advice regarding developing venture capital markets appears increasingly disparate. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors engage the assumptions that underpin three dominant policy approaches to the development of venture capital markets with regard to the role of governments in that process. The authors categorize existing empirical studies against three approaches and give examples of the different government policies associated with the various approaches.

Findings

Direct and indirect approaches recognize the importance of active stock markets but largely ignore the dynamic processes of markets, asserting that the provision of capital, institutional changes, and financial incentives ex ante will cause a positive market reaction, regardless of the market’s context. The recent timed approached is purported as being more comprehensive in its awareness of the need to adapt to countries’ contexts and the need for varying policies at the different stages of market emergence.

Research limitations/implications

Limited empirical research tests the voracity and limitations of the timed approach. The challenge in doing so is that evolutionary theories typically explain an event after it has occurred, thus its predictive power is often limited. Future research might investigate the efficacy of policy levers based on the timed approach.

Practical implications

The authors highlight the need for the development of venture capital markets, rather than a venture capital industry.

Originality/value

The authors extend the existing venture capital market development categories and evaluate each approach in terms of the efficacy of government’s roles in venture capital market development in light of the existing evidence of economic development and entrepreneurial activity.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Lemuria Carter

E‐government adoption is the focus of many research studies. However, few studies have compared the adoption factors to identify the most salient predictors of e‐government

Abstract

Purpose

E‐government adoption is the focus of many research studies. However, few studies have compared the adoption factors to identify the most salient predictors of e‐government use. The purpose of this paper is to compare popular adoption constructs to identify the most influential.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to elicit citizen perceptions of e‐government services.

Findings

The results of stepwise regression indicate perceived usefulness, trust of the internet, previous use of an e‐government service and perceived ease of use all have a significant impact on one's intention to use an e‐government service. Perceived usefulness emerges as the most important factor in predicting e‐government adoption. This factor alone explains 74.8 percent of the variance in intention to use.

Research limitations/implications

In light of these findings, researchers should still explore the role of adoption factors in e‐government diffusion. The proposed model is a robust, yet parsimonious way to explore the key factors that influence technology acceptance. This study includes the adoption perceptions of citizens from one state in the USA. Future studies should overcome this limitation by incorporating citizens from other regions and nations.

Practical implications

This study illustrates the elements of e‐government use that are most salient to citizens. Government agencies should focus on these factors when designing and promoting e‐services.

Originality/value

This study shows that the integration of a technology acceptance model, trust and previous e‐government experience work together to explain a large percentage of variance in intention to use e‐government. In particular, perceived usefulness (aka relative advantage, aka performance expectancy) is the most salient predictor.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 15000