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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Samantha L. Jordan, Andreas Wihler, Wayne A. Hochwarter and Gerald R. Ferris

Introduced into the literature a decade ago, grit originally defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals has stimulated considerable research on positive…

Abstract

Introduced into the literature a decade ago, grit originally defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals has stimulated considerable research on positive effects primarily in the academic and military contexts, as well as attracted widespread media attention. Despite recent criticism regarding grit’s construct and criterion-related validity, research on grit has begun to spill over into the work context as well. In this chapter, the authors provide an overview of the initial theoretical foundations of grit as a motivational driver, and present newer conceptualizations on the mechanisms of grit’s positive effects rooted in goal-setting theory. Furthermore, the authors also draw attention to existing shortcomings of the current definition and measurement of grit, and their implications for its scientific and practical application. After establishing a theoretical understanding, the authors discuss the potential utility of grit for human resource management, related to staffing and recruitment, development and training, and performance management systems as well as performance evaluations. The authors conclude this chapter with a discussion of necessary and potential future research, and consider the practical implications of grit in its current state.

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Caroline J. Uittenbroek, Leonie B. Janssen-Jansen and Hens A.C. Runhaar

The purpose of this paper is to identify stimuli for climate adaptation in cities and more specifically to explore whether different stimuli inspire different governance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify stimuli for climate adaptation in cities and more specifically to explore whether different stimuli inspire different governance approaches to climate adaptation – e.g. dedicated (adaptation as a new policy field) or mainstreaming (integrating in existing policy fields).

Design/methodology/approach

For this explorative case study research, an early adapter was selected: Philadelphia (USA). By reconstructing the organization of two climate adaptation programs, the authors have identified stimuli and whether these influence the city’s governance approach. The reconstruction is based on data triangulation that consists of semi-structured interviews with actors involved in these programs, policy documents and newspaper articles.

Findings

The research illustrates the importance of stimuli such as strategically framing climate adaptation within wider urban agendas, political leadership and institutional entrepreneurs. Moreover, the research reveals that it is often a combination of stimuli that triggers a governance approach and that there is a possible link between specific stimuli and governance approaches, proposing that some stimuli will trigger a dedicated approach to climate adaptation, while others initiate a mainstreaming approach.

Originality/value

An in-depth understanding of stimuli of climate adaptation is currently lacking in literature, as most of the studies have focused on barriers to climate adaptation. Moreover, still little is known about what explains why certain governance approaches to climate adaptation emerge.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Anne-Maria Holma

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial…

Abstract

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial network approach (see, e.g., Axelsson & Easton, 1992; Håkansson & Snehota, 1995a). The study describes how adaptations initiate, how they progress, and what the outcomes of these adaptations are. Furthermore, the framework takes into account how adaptations spread in triadic relationship settings. The empirical context is corporate travel management, which is a chain of activities where an industrial enterprise, and its preferred travel agency and service supplier partners combine their resources. The scientific philosophy, on which the knowledge creation is based, is realist ontology. Epistemologically, the study relies on constructionist processes and interpretation. Case studies with in-depth interviews are the main source of data.

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Deep Knowledge of B2B Relationships within and Across Borders
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-858-7

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Abstract

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Mark B. Houston, S. Ratneshwar, Lisa Ricci and Alan J. Malter

We develop an integrative conceptualization of how firms set and alter strategic goals, incorporating insights from goal-setting literatures across the disciplines of…

Abstract

We develop an integrative conceptualization of how firms set and alter strategic goals, incorporating insights from goal-setting literatures across the disciplines of marketing, management, and psychology. Our framework accounts for the internal and external forces that impact the content of a firm's goals as well as the dynamic processes by which these goals are formed and changed over time. By proposing this framework, we strive to offer insights into the “black box” of organizational goals that connect firm resources and environmental context to firm strategies. Illustrative data to support our framework are provided from a case study of a Fortune 100 communication firm's entry into an emerging, high-technology, new product marketplace.

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-475-8

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Hongyuan Wang, Rutvij Mehta, Lawrence Chung, Sam Supakkul and Liguo Huang

In order for a software system to better serve the user, it should be able to adjust its behavior according to the changing needs in the environment. Oftentimes, selecting…

Abstract

Purpose

In order for a software system to better serve the user, it should be able to adjust its behavior according to the changing needs in the environment. Oftentimes, selecting a particular action may depend upon various non‐functional requirements (NFRs) such as safety, cost, and so on. In the past, the many possible alternatives for an adaptation action by and large have not been considered systematically and rationally, keeping various NFRs in mind, hence, resulting in low‐level of confidence that such an action is indeed a best possible one that is really desirable. The purpose of this paper is to present a goal‐oriented approach to select alternative(s) based on a particular contextual event, while considering important NFRs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a goal‐oriented approach in which various NFRs are treated as softgoals to be satisficed and used in exploring, analyzing and selecting among possible adaptation alternatives, in consideration of the particular contextual event.

Findings

Without the goal‐oriented methodology, which offers an ontology enriched with the notion of goals for contextual information and also integrates rules for triggering adaptation, the authors feel, through their scenario study applied to their smart‐phone application, that some critical issues might not have been considered in building a usable, useful system.

Originality/value

The concepts introduced in this paper provide a systematic and rational approach to select adaptation alternative(s), considering NFRs along with detecting a contextual event.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Andreas Größler, André Grübner and Peter M. Milling

Based on a conceptual framework of the linkages between strategic manufacturing goals and complexity, the purpose of this paper is to investigate adaptation processes in…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a conceptual framework of the linkages between strategic manufacturing goals and complexity, the purpose of this paper is to investigate adaptation processes in manufacturing firms to increasing external complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested with statistical analyses (group comparisons and structural equation models) that are conducted with data from the third round of the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey.

Findings

The study shows that manufacturing firms face different degrees of complexity. Firms in a more complex environment tend to possess a more complex internal structure, as indicated by process configuration, than firms in a less complex environment. Also depending on the degree of complexity, different processes of adaptation to increases in external complexity are initiated by organisations.

Research limitations/implications

Research studies taking into account the dynamics of adaptation processes would be helpful in order to draw further conclusions, for instance, based on longitudinal analyses or simulation studies.

Practical implications

Depending on the level of complexity a firm has been confronted with in the past, different adaptation processes to further growing complexity can be initiated. Firms in high complexity environments have to re‐configure their strategic goals; firms in low complexity environments have to build‐up internal complexity to cope with demands from the outside.

Originality/value

The paper distinguishes between adaptation processes in low and high complexity environments and provides explanations for the differences.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Frank Fitzpatrick

Abstract

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Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Ricardo Madureira

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal…

Abstract

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal mechanisms of coordination in multinational corporations. The main questions addressed include the following. (1) What factors influence the occurrence of personal contacts of foreign subsidiary managers in industrial multinational corporations? (2) How such personal contacts enable coordination in industrial markets and within multinational firms? The theoretical context of the paper is based on: (1) the interaction approach to industrial markets, (2) the network approach to industrial markets, and (3) the process approach to multinational management. The unit of analysis is the foreign subsidiary manager as the focal actor of a contact network. The paper is empirically focused on Portuguese sales subsidiaries of Finnish multinational corporations, which are managed by either a parent country national (Finnish), a host country national (Portuguese) or a third country national. The paper suggests eight scenarios of individual dependence and uncertainty, which are determined by individual, organizational, and/or market factors. Such scenarios are, in turn, thought to require personal contacts with specific functions. The paper suggests eight interpersonal roles of foreign subsidiary managers, by which the functions of their personal contacts enable inter-firm coordination in industrial markets. In addition, the paper suggests eight propositions on how the functions of their personal contacts enable centralization, formalization, socialization and horizontal communication in multinational corporations.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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