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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Louise Gillies and Helen M. Burrows

Families conduct their affairs through processes that are built upon those of previous generations and also social capacities such as culture, class, oppression and…

Abstract

Families conduct their affairs through processes that are built upon those of previous generations and also social capacities such as culture, class, oppression and poverty. The media has played a part in stereotyping the lower classes through their portrayal on the television programmes such as Benefits Street and Jeremy Kyle and tabloid newspaper stories. This chapter is a case study of two families who are at the opposing ends of the social scale, the Horrobin/Carter and Aldridge families. The two families were chosen due to them being linked by marriage in the younger generation. Through the use of genograms, we explore how the families differ in their attitudes towards relationships within their individual families, and also how they relate to each other as separate family groups. Despite the many differences, there are also a number of key similarities, particularly regarding the key females in the families, in terms of family background and snobbery. We also show that there is little family loyalty in the more privileged family and a power differential between the two families (oppressors vs. oppressed) in terms of the crimes committed.

Details

Custard, Culverts and Cake
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-285-7

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Carlo Salvato, Francesco Chirico and Pramodita Sharma

In this chapter we investigate the role of family-specific factors in facilitating or constraining business exit in family firms. Family business literature seems to have…

Abstract

In this chapter we investigate the role of family-specific factors in facilitating or constraining business exit in family firms. Family business literature seems to have an implicit bias toward continuity and persistence in the founder's business. This is explained by heavy emotional involvement and development of path-dependent core competences over generations. However, several long-lived family firms were able to successfully exit the founder's business. Exit allowed them to free significant strategic resources, which were later reinvested in exploiting novel entrepreneurial opportunities. Our aim is to investigate the process of exit from the founder's business in family firms, to explain both triggers and obstacles to decommitment and de-escalation. We address this issue through the study of the Italian Falck Group's exit from the steel industry in the 1990s, followed by successful startup of a renewable energy business. By carefully triangulating different data sources and different voices within and outside the controlling family, we develop a framework describing family-specific facilitators and inhibitors of business exit, and subsequent startup of a new business. Three types of family-specific factors emerge as relevant in shaping a family firm's likelihood and speed of exit from a failing business: family-related psychological triggers and obstacles to business exit; family-specific components of the structural de-escalation context; family responses to ensuing de-escalation and exit needs. The emerging framework offers a more nuanced interpretation of decommitment activities in family firms, pointing to the differential role family-specific factors may play as facilitators or inhibitors of business exit. We also suggest how these family-specific results may contribute to a deeper understanding of exit in nonfamily firms. Our results also have practical implications for family business entrepreneurial management. Actively managing the different determinants of exit choices that emerged from our study will set the stage for de-escalation from a failing course of action – a dynamic capability all family firms should learn and practice if they intend to transfer their entrepreneurial orientation to next generations.

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Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

S. Rees and T. Ryan‐Morgan

In accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005, this paper aims to explore the steps taken to maximise an individual's ability to make decisions in regards to making a Will.

Abstract

Purpose

In accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005, this paper aims to explore the steps taken to maximise an individual's ability to make decisions in regards to making a Will.

Design/methodology/approach

Concepts relating to testamentary capacity are discussed and assessed thematically.

Findings

The case work illustrates how a systematic, structured, evidence‐based and individually focused approach to assessing and optimising capacity (under the terms of the Mental Capacity Act 2005) can be effective.

Originality/value

The paper sets out a framework for maximising capacity for decision making.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Priscila Gasperin Pellegrini, Júlia Gonçalves and Suzana da Rosa Tolfo

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of workplace bullying on the marital relationship of three Brazilian couples.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of workplace bullying on the marital relationship of three Brazilian couples.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a qualitative approach with multiple cases. Data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews with the victims, followed by interviews with each couple. Then, the information obtained was categorised and analysed according to the content analysis approach.

Findings

The findings indicate that the experience of workplace bullying by one of the spouses influenced their marital relationship, since there were periods of estrangement, conflicts, and changes in sexual behaviour, and subsequent reconciliation. At the same time, the marital relationship played a protective role against workplace bullying.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study which aims to understand the repercussions of workplace bullying on marital relationships, rather than draw conclusions about all bullied workers and their marital relationships. The identification and analysis of these repercussions may contribute to deepen the understanding of the importance of the victim’s significant other when facing bullying.

Practical implications

This research expands the perception of the consequences and influences of workplace bullying, which are not restricted to the victim. Furthermore, the detailed information demonstrates the importance of including multiple participants in the research, and additional tools to collect data.

Originality/value

By providing a deeper understanding of the impact of workplace bullying on the victims and their families, in particular on the marital relationship of these workers, the study shows that workplace bullying does not affect only those who are directly linked to the organisation.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2016

Ashton Chapman, Caroline Sanner, Lawrence Ganong, Marilyn Coleman, Luke Russell, Youngjin Kang and Sarah Mitchell

Stepgrandparent-stepgrandchild relationships are increasingly common as a result of relatively high rates of divorce and remarriage and increased longevity. When…

Abstract

Purpose

Stepgrandparent-stepgrandchild relationships are increasingly common as a result of relatively high rates of divorce and remarriage and increased longevity. When relationships are close, stepgrandparents may be valuable resources for stepgrandchildren, but the relational processes salient to the development of these ties remain largely unknown. The purposes of our research were: (1) to explore the complexity of stepgrandparent-stepgrandchild relationships, and (2) to examine processes that affected stepgrandparent-stepgrandchild relationship development.

Methodology/Approach

We present results from four grounded theory projects, which were based on semistructured interviews with 58 stepgrandchildren who provided data about 165 relationships with stepgrandparents. Collectively, these studies highlighted key processes of stepgrandparent-stepgrandchild relationship development operating within four distinct pathways to stepgrandparenthood – long-term, later life, skip-generation, and inherited pathways.

Findings

Stepgrandchildren’s closeness to stepgrandparents was influenced by factors such as timing (the child’s age and when in their life courses intergenerational relationships began), stepgrandparents’ roles in the life of the middle-generation parent and the quality of those relationships, whether or not the stepfamily defined the stepgrandparent as kin (e.g., through the use of claiming language), intergenerational contact frequency, and stepgrandparents’ affinity-building.

Originality/Value

Our study furthers understanding of stepgrandparent-stepgrandchild by attending to the importance of context in examining the processes that affect intergenerational steprelationship development. Exploring processes related to intergenerational steprelationships strengthens our understanding of the benefits and challenges associated with steprelationship development. Our study also sheds light on the “new look at kinship” and the processes that inform the social construction of family in a changing familial landscape.

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Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage: The Transformation of Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-229-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Maria Griffiths, Jo Allen, Krisna Patel and Victoria Bell

Families play an instrumental role in helping relatives experiencing mental health issues to stay well. In the context of wider initiatives promoting family and carer…

Abstract

Purpose

Families play an instrumental role in helping relatives experiencing mental health issues to stay well. In the context of wider initiatives promoting family and carer needs, this study aims to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and potential benefits of bespoke training to develop clinicians’ skills in working with families in crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was an uncontrolled evaluation of a one-day workshop for home treatment team staff using pre- and post-questionnaires.

Findings

In total, 83 staff members participated. Overall, there was a strong agreement for the involvement of families, which increased marginally after training. There were significant changes in views about talking to family members without service user consent (p = 0.001) and keeping them informed of their relative’s well-being (p = 0.02). Qualitative feedback indicated that participants enjoyed the interactive elements, particularly role-playing. Training provided an opportunity to practice skills, share knowledge and facilitate the integration of family work into their professional role.

Research limitations/implications

Confident support for families contributes to effective mediation of crisis and continuation of care; factors important in reducing admission rates and protecting interpersonal relationships. Overall, the consistency of responses obtained from participants suggests that this workshop offers a helpful introduction to a family approach at times of a mental health crisis.

Originality/value

This pilot evaluation suggests this new one-day workshop, is a feasible and acceptable training program, which is beneficial in developing clinicians’ skills in working with families in a crisis.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Dawn McBride

This article will outline my experiences and offer practical recommendations when teaching in a university classroom when the professor and the students come from vastly…

Abstract

This article will outline my experiences and offer practical recommendations when teaching in a university classroom when the professor and the students come from vastly different cultural backgrounds. I recently relocated from Canada to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to teach female Muslim post secondary students - many of whom are the first in their family to receive higher education. Since it was difficult to find material on how to adapt one’s teaching style to be more culturally sensitive in the university classroom, the intention of this article is to provide specific tips and strategies on how to adapt one’s teaching style when immersed in an unfamiliar culture.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Rocio Arteaga and Timur Uman

This study explores the family governance structures that family firms employ to manage family business tensions.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the family governance structures that family firms employ to manage family business tensions.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on socioemotional wealth perspective and adopting a narrative methodological approach, the study analyses nine unique narratives of representatives of three Swedish family firms.

Findings

The study illustrates how the hybrid arena created between formal and informal family meetings is used as a governance structure for mitigating tensions by reinforcing family relational ties.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the findings, this study suggests how reliance on hybrid arena informs the field of family business management and governance and suggests future research directions.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide opportunities for family business practitioners, including owners, family members, family firm advisers and other stakeholders, to effectively manage family business tensions and foster socioemotional wealth.

Originality/value

In family firms, tensions can arise due to a desire for the preservation of socioemotional wealth. The authors show that these tensions may be managed by using informal and formal family meetings that create a hybrid arena where family members separate family and business issues and emotional and rational reactions, thereby avoiding negative emotions and creating a culture of harmony within the family.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Enid Hilton Brown

Organizations are searching for new methodologies to address their biggest concern for the future ‐ their health. In a world of risk, danger, and corporate diseases…

Abstract

Organizations are searching for new methodologies to address their biggest concern for the future ‐ their health. In a world of risk, danger, and corporate diseases, survival may depend on resilience. Addressing organizational health offers opportunities for harnessing powerful resources within an organization, including the pathologies which often manifest themselves in patterns such as the euphoria of corporate adrenaline, the terror of inside competition, the scripts of success and failure ‐ each reflecting the trauma which can cripple an organization “invisibly”. These pathologies are epidemic; the patterns repeat in every industry, every government and social institution. The workplace of the future will also manifest these conditions. How we choose to address the pathologies, and our health, can change. We may complain, deny, point fingers and cry. We may delude ourselves with the antiseptic quick fix! Or we can address our health honestly and with honour. Our future is at stake.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Britta Boyd, Susanne Royer, Rong Pei and Xiaolei Zhang

Knowledge often is the fundament for strategic competitive advantage. Thus, it is highly relevant to understand better how knowledge is transferred from one generation to…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge often is the fundament for strategic competitive advantage. Thus, it is highly relevant to understand better how knowledge is transferred from one generation to the next in family businesses. The purpose of this paper is to link the competitive advantage realisation in family businesses to the success of transferring strategically valuable knowledge in different business environments to the next generation.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on the contingency model of family business succession (Royer et al., 2008) knowledge transfer in family businesses from different cultures is investigated in this paper. From a resource-oriented and transaction cost inspired perspective two family businesses with a similar industry background from China and Europe are compared regarding knowledge transfer in the context of family firm succession taking into account the respective transaction atmosphere.

Findings

Different successions for two long-lived family firms are illustrated in a systematic fashion: based on the theoretical elements suggested both cases are described to get insights into the usefulness of the theoretical reasoning developed. On the basis of these, the cases are compared with each other and conclusions for both cases are drawn. Implications for theory and practice as well as avenues for future research are sketched.

Originality/value

The focus of the current study is to gain more insight into long-lived family businesses by comparing two cases over a period of more than 200 years with regard to strategically relevant resources as well as the underlying transaction atmospheres. Implications for family firms depending on the resource types and transaction atmosphere are discussed.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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