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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Christa A. Boske

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of aspiring school leaders who utilized artmaking (in this case, photography, poetry, music, collage, and short…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of aspiring school leaders who utilized artmaking (in this case, photography, poetry, music, collage, and short films) through Microsoft MovieMaker as a means for addressing injustices within surrounding school communities. The paper aims to explore how aspiring school leaders understood contemporary curriculum issues within increasingly culturally diverse school communities in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This two‐year qualitative study embedded in grounded theory examined the experiences of aspiring school leaders who utilized artmaking (in this case short films through Microsoft MovieMaker) to examine contemporary curriculum issues within surrounding school communities. This study is conducted within the naturalistic tradition.

Findings

The significance of artmaking encourages participants to visually articulate the lived realities of disenfranchised populations. Participants engage in artmaking experience self‐transformation and a calling to encouraging human agency.

Originality/value

In the wake of addressing issues of social justice, the highly charged emotions associated with addressing such issues is evident in the range of emotions that surface including, anger, fear, intimidation, deep sorrow, resentment, joy, and others. Very little scholarship exists for aspiring school leaders who confront issues of social justice in relation to the intensity of emotions and their work.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2008

Jo May

In this article I examine one film, Puberty Blues, directed by Bruce Beresford in 1981. According to the Australian Film Commission, the film is number forty four of the…

Abstract

In this article I examine one film, Puberty Blues, directed by Bruce Beresford in 1981. According to the Australian Film Commission, the film is number forty four of the top Australian films at the Australian Box Office from 1966 to 2005 having earned over three million dollars. The view put here is that this film throws light on the history of the comprehensive coeducational high school at a particular moment. The article maintains that Puberty Blues pursues a damning representation of the ineffectual and irrelevant nature of school life for the students it features. This unsettling film shows the comprehensive coeducational secondary school, itself a product of a middle class vision of the civil society, to be failing in its promise of extending ‘respectable’ and materially aspirant middle class values to youth. It is suggested that the decline in patronage of the public coeducational comprehensive school by the middle class and aspiring others may in part be attributable overall to the powerful negative images of schools such as those in Puberty Blues that have widely circulated in Australian and Anglophone popular culture, especially in feature film. It also hypothesises that the middle class flight from the comprehensive high school may be in part attributable to the fact that some of their children may have ‘deserted’ the schools first.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Penny Smith

The author argues that messages about educational administrators found in contemporary films both shape and limit popular discourse about schools and their mission. Of…

Abstract

The author argues that messages about educational administrators found in contemporary films both shape and limit popular discourse about schools and their mission. Of particular importance is the dissonance between the celluloid images created by Hollywood and the complex and challenging realities found in our own communities. Based on a textual analysis of 28 recent productions, she argues that practitioners would do well to attend popular culture representations and to consider the ways in which mass media shape policy debates about public institutions and appropriate administrative behavior.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2016

Jessica Lipschultz

This study documents the role of relational trust in an afterschool organization and its influences on young people’s experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

This study documents the role of relational trust in an afterschool organization and its influences on young people’s experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a 10-month ethnographic study of one afterschool program that teaches teens how to make documentaries, I demonstrate that the confluence of blurred organizational goals; weak relational trust among staff; and funding pressures may have the unintended consequence of exploiting students for their work products and life stories.

Findings

The study finds that, while not all organizations function with student work at its center, many afterschool organizations are under increasing pressures to document student gains through tangible measures.

Practical implications

Implications from these findings reveal the need for developing strong relationships among staff members as well as establishing transparency in funding afterschool programs from within the organization and from foundations in order to provide quality programming for young people.

Originality/value

This study informs organizational theory, specifically in terms of measures of variation in relational trust within an organization and its influence on young people. This chapter includes student accounts of experiences with staff to enhance the significance of relational trust.

Details

Education and Youth Today
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-046-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Roger C. Shouse

This paper seeks to examine ways in which the film To Sir with Love illustrates several longstanding issues and tensions related to the sociology of education. It is also…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine ways in which the film To Sir with Love illustrates several longstanding issues and tensions related to the sociology of education. It is also aims to show how this film (and, by implication, other popular films) can be used to advance understanding among students of educational leadership, organization theory, and the sociology of education.

Design/methodology/approach

Approaching its 40th anniversary, To Sir with Love is generally considered to be a classic portrayal of a teacher's struggle to engage a group of disengaged and rebellious students in a working class London school. Yet the film also highlights longstanding issues and tensions peculiar to schooling and teaching. From sociological and social‐psychological perspectives, this paper examines this film's underlying meanings and suggests how it can be used to advance understanding among students of educational leadership, organization theory, and the sociology of education.

Findings

Although the paper focuses on teacher‐student‐peer social interaction, it largely leaves issues of race and class for others to address.

Practical implications

Implicitly and explicitly, the paper highlights the value of using popular film to promote understanding of problems related to educational policy and leadership.

Originality/value

A lively discussion, an attempt to construct (rather than deconstruct) new meanings from a classic text.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Coral Houtman, Maureen Thomas and Jennifer Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to address the advantages of education and training in creating the “Audiovisual/Digital Media Essay” (AV/DME), starting from visual and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the advantages of education and training in creating the “Audiovisual/Digital Media Essay” (AV/DME), starting from visual and cinematic thinking as a way of setting up, developing and concluding an argument.

Design/methodology/approach

Recognising the advantages to education and training of the “AV/DME” this paper explores ways of enabling visually disciplined students to work on film theory within their chosen medium, and to develop arguments incorporating audiovisual sources, using appropriate academic skills. It describes a hands-on BA/MA workshop held at Newport Film School (May 2011) and subsequent initial implementation of an examinable DME. The paper contextualises the issue in the light of practice-led and practice-based research and of parity with written dissertations. Drawing on analysis of in-depth interviews with students and tutors, it makes practical recommendations for how to resource, staff and support the implementation and continuation of the AV/DME and/or dissertation.

Findings

The paper feeds back from both students and staff on the running of an initial AV/DME workshop and finds that the Film School Newport is suited to running the AV/DME and suggests a framework for its support.

Research limitations/implications

The study needs to be followed up when the students complete their full dissertations.

Practical implications

The AV/DME needs sufficient technical and human resources to support student learning.

Originality/value

The paper provides a clear and original framework for teaching, supporting and assessing the AV/DME. This framework can be disseminated beyond the University of Wales Newport, and can be used to teach the AV/DME in further contexts and to wider groups of students.

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Abstract

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1960

A regular feature giving news and comments on events and productions in the field of visual aids for technical and scientific teaching and training

Abstract

A regular feature giving news and comments on events and productions in the field of visual aids for technical and scientific teaching and training

Details

Education + Training, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Jessie Nixon

This paper aims to demonstrate how teaching the discourse of critique, an integral part of the video production process, can be used to eliminate barriers for young people…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how teaching the discourse of critique, an integral part of the video production process, can be used to eliminate barriers for young people in gaining new media literacy skills helping more young people become producers rather than consumers of digital media.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes an instrumental qualitative case study (Stake, 2000) in two elective high school video production classrooms in the Midwestern region of the USA. The author conducted observations, video and audio recorded critique sessions, conducted semi-structured interviews and collected artifacts throughout production including storyboards, brainstorms and rough and final cuts of videos.

Findings

Throughout critique, young video producers used argumentation strategies to cocreate meaning, multiple methods of inquiry and questioning, critically evaluated feedback and synthesized their ideas and those of their peers to achieve their intended artistic vision. Young video producers used feedback in the following ways: incorporated feedback directly into their work, rejected and ignored feedback, or incorporated some element of the feedback in a way not originally intended.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how teaching the discourse of critique can be used to eliminate barriers for young people in gaining new media literacy skills. Educators can teach argumentation and inquiry strategies through using thinking guides that encourage active processing and through engaging near peer mentors. Classroom educators can integrate the arts-based practice of the pitch critique session to maximize the impact of peer-to-peer learning.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

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