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Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2013

Jill Blackmore

This chapter will explore how different feminist theories and theorists have informed what counts as research, what is defined as a research issue, and methodological…

Abstract

This chapter will explore how different feminist theories and theorists have informed what counts as research, what is defined as a research issue, and methodological approaches to research in higher education. It will consider the theoretical and methodological tools feminist academics have mobilized in order to develop more powerful explanations of how gender and other forms of difference work in the relation to the positioning of the individual, higher education and the nation state within globalized economies. It pays particular regard to the feminist political project of social justice.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-682-8

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Craig Shepherd

The purpose of this paper is to critique the argument that research methodology is gendered and present a post‐essentialist understanding of research methods.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critique the argument that research methodology is gendered and present a post‐essentialist understanding of research methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual paper which engages with the feminist debate over the gendering of methodology.

Findings

The paper begins by discussing the feminist critique of positivism that quantitative methodologies embody patriarchal assumptions. Then, drawing on contemporary attempts by feminists to rehabilitate quantitative research, and developments in organizational research methods, it counters the argument that methodologies are gendered. Specifically, it argues the idea that methods embody gendered assumptions is founded on essentialist reasoning and treats them as having immutable characteristics. Moving on, the paper offers a post‐essentialist understanding of “methods as text”. Key advantages of this metaphor are that it acknowledges the interpretative flexibility of research methods and illustrates the rhetorical function descriptions of them perform in particular contexts. Finally, the contributions and limitations of this perspective and its implications for future research are summarised.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to understand how research methods are discursively constructed and the rhetorical functions descriptions of them perform in specific contexts.

Originality/value

The paper critiques the view that research methodology is gendered and offers a novel metaphor for understanding research methods. It is likely to be of most value to social scientists with an interest in research methods and/or feminist epistemologies.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Rosario Undurraga

This paper aims to offer an account of the research process and reflects on feminist research practice. It discusses methodological issues based on the author's experience…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer an account of the research process and reflects on feminist research practice. It discusses methodological issues based on the author's experience as a PhD student in sociology carrying out fieldwork with women in Latin America. The paper makes the research process transparent and shows how feminist epistemologies inform the research strategies the author used in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a reflexive piece about the methodology and method used and the dilemmas encountered in the author's empirical work as a feminist doctoral researcher. It considers biographical issues and personal interests in relation to the research.

Findings

The article discusses methodological assumptions and feminist epistemologies. It examines the interview as a research method as well as interviewing skills. It reflects on research practice, considering power issues, feminist challenges in the field, and the topic of reflexivity and otherness.

Originality/value

The article provides an account of feminist research practice, and considers the roles and skills of the researcher when interviewing. It contributes to knowledge by providing real examples of feminist research in Latin America.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 May 2016

Margaret Byrne Swain

This chapter engages cosmopolitan and feminist paradigms of knowledge production through their shared ethics of social justice, equality, and diversity, promoting…

Abstract

This chapter engages cosmopolitan and feminist paradigms of knowledge production through their shared ethics of social justice, equality, and diversity, promoting integration into an emerging postdisciplinary focus on embodied cosmopolitanism(s) as a promising way forward in tourism studies. Cosmopolitan paradigms theorize the dialectics of cultural diversity and universal rights, while feminist cosmopolitanism focuses on gender and sexuality equality and difference within this intersection. An embodied approach combines work on “the body” and “situated embodiment” with the cosmopolitan to embrace all human differences and acknowledge that the researchers’ own embodied cosmopolitanism affects research questions, ethics, and praxis toward transformation in research communities and the academy.

Details

Tourism Research Paradigms: Critical and Emergent Knowledges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-929-4

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Stacy J. Williams

This study examines liberal second-wave feminists’ writings about cooking. Most scholarship of liberal feminism has focused on the attempts to integrate women into…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines liberal second-wave feminists’ writings about cooking. Most scholarship of liberal feminism has focused on the attempts to integrate women into previously male-dominated public spaces such as higher education, the professions, and political office. Less attention has been paid to how these feminists politicized feminized spaces such as the home. A longstanding tension between the housewife role and feminist identities has led many to theorize that feminists avoid or resent domestic tasks. However, I argue that some liberal feminists in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s suggested engaging with cooking in subversive ways that challenged patriarchal institutions and supported their political goals.

Methodology/approach

I analyze 148 articles about cooking in Ms. magazine between 1972 and 1985. I also analyze the copy and recipes within four community cookbooks published by liberal feminist organizations.

Findings

I find that liberal feminists suggested utilizing time- and labor-saving cooking methods, encouraged men to cook, and proposed that women make money from cooking. These three techniques challenged the traditional division of domestic labor, supported women’s involvement in the paid workplace, and increased women’s control of economic resources.

Originality/value

This study turns the opposition between feminism and feminized tasks on its head, showing that rather than avoiding cooking, some liberal feminists proposed ways of cooking that challenged patriarchal institutions. I show how subordinate populations can develop ways of subversively engaging with tasks that are typically seen as oppressive, using them in an attempt to advance their social position.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Brigid Limerick and Jane O'Leary

To provide examples of qualitative research based on feminist epistemological assumptions. Such research re‐invents rather than recycles management theory, producing…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide examples of qualitative research based on feminist epistemological assumptions. Such research re‐invents rather than recycles management theory, producing alternative understandings which speak to the demands of managing post‐corporate workplaces characterised by growing levels of diversity and rapid discontinuous change.

Design/methodology/approach

Reports on three feminist qualitative research projects. Describes research processes and outcomes which aim to reflexively attend to diverse voices and researcher and research participant subjectivities.

Findings

Provides tangible examples of empirical feminist qualitative research, including discussions of how the research was conducted, the nature of the findings and critical reflections on the extent to which the researchers' feminist epistemological assumptions were enacted.

Research limitations/implications

The three research projects discussed have all been conducted within the Australian education sector. Accordingly, future research could focus on providing practical examples of feminist qualitative research approaches in the management field, in different international and industrial/sector contexts.

Practical implications

Provides management researchers with three examples of feminist qualitative research covering diverse topics including leadership, mentoring and ethics.

Originality/value

While there is a plethora of writing concerned with feminist research generally, there is a dearth of feminist research in the management field specifically. This paper's contribution therefore lies in providing tangible examples of feminist qualitative research in the management field.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2016

Leslie Sherlock

To reflects upon gender, research relationships and ‘elite’ participants and highlight how traditional use of labels for gender identity and sexual orientation, as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

To reflects upon gender, research relationships and ‘elite’ participants and highlight how traditional use of labels for gender identity and sexual orientation, as well as other aspects of identity, often serve to restrict a fuller picture as well as some more fluid queer realities.

Methodology/approach

This chapter uses queer and feminist theories to explore the relationships when the researcher and participants belong to a shared peer group of sex education professionals. It examines the choice to avoid pronoun usage or collection of demographic data, gendered or otherwise, and reflexively contemplates the impact and practicalities of friendship relationships within the research context.

Findings

I suggest that tensions often exist between feminist and queer methodologies and this chapter offers reflections for navigating and reconciling these tensions, opening up new possibilities for respectful and nuanced participant representation within research findings.

Originality/value

This chapter serves to further develop what it might mean to have a queer and feminist methodological approach to research, and specifically explores the application of such a framework when considering practices of collecting participant demographic data, classifying participants as ‘elites’ and reflecting upon friendships with participants.

Details

Gender Identity and Research Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-025-1

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Banu Ozkazanc‐Pan

The purpose of this paper is to outline the challenges and complexities in conducting research faced by scholars utilizing postcolonial feminist frameworks. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the challenges and complexities in conducting research faced by scholars utilizing postcolonial feminist frameworks. The paper discusses postcolonial feminist key concepts, namely representation, subalternity, and reflexivity and the challenges scholars face when deploying these concepts in fieldwork settings. The paper then outlines the implications of these concepts for feminist praxis related to international management theory, research, and writing as well as entrepreneurship programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses the experiences of the author in conducting fieldwork on Turkish high‐technology entrepreneurs in the USA and Turkey by focusing explicitly on the challenges and complexities postcolonial feminist frameworks bring to ethnography and auto‐ethnography.

Findings

The paper suggests that conducting fieldwork guided by postcolonial feminist frameworks faces challenges related to representation inclusive of the author and the participants in the study. It offers subalternity as a relational understanding of subjects in contrast to comparative approaches to the study of business people. The paper also discusses how positionality impacts reflexivity through gender, ethnicity, and class relations.

Originality/value

This paper offers a critical perspective on conducting research related to non‐Western subjects by addressing issues arising from feminist and postcolonial intersections. It is a valuable contribution to those researchers who are interested in conducting feminist research particularly with non‐Western people and cultures.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2010

Anne R. Roschelle, Maura I. Toro-Morn and Elisa Facio

Purpose – Recent theoretical analyses examining the intersection of race, class, and gender have resulted in exciting new epistemological frameworks in the social…

Abstract

Purpose – Recent theoretical analyses examining the intersection of race, class, and gender have resulted in exciting new epistemological frameworks in the social sciences. However, feminist researchers have yet to articulate concrete strategies for capturing this intersectionality empirically.

Methodology – On the basis of ethnographic research conducted in Cuba, we build on previous feminist epistemological insights and begin to develop methodological strategies that can be used to capture the intersection of race, class, and gender in the context of cross-cultural research.

Findings – The major contribution of our work is the articulation of theoretical insights into methodological guidelines that can guide research both inside the United States, the site where much of this theorizing takes place, and beyond our borders.

Research limitations – The primary limitation of our research is the lack of collaboration with Cuban researchers. Given the political rancor between the United States and Cuba, and limitations on their academic freedom, is difficult to work with Cuban scholars without compromising their security. Cuban scholars who are critical of the state are fearful of potential reprisals.

Originality – Nonetheless, our work provides a unique analysis of how to capture the intersection of race, class, and gender empirically from a cross-cultural perspective.

Details

Interactions and Intersections of Gendered Bodies at Work, at Home, and at Play
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-944-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Miriam Catterall, Pauline Maclaran and Lorna Stevens

From the early 1990s a number of papers advocating feminist analyses of marketing phenomena appeared in the marketing literature. Scholars working from feminist

Abstract

From the early 1990s a number of papers advocating feminist analyses of marketing phenomena appeared in the marketing literature. Scholars working from feminist perspectives in other disciplines have examined marketing phenomena for some time. Provides a guide to this literature, highlighting the scope of the work and its diversity, and suggests areas where more research is needed.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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