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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Asma Alwreikat, Ahmed Shehata and Metwaly Ali Mohamed Edakar

This study investigates the effect of protection motivation theory (PMT) constructs on Arab women's feelings while seeking information during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the effect of protection motivation theory (PMT) constructs on Arab women's feelings while seeking information during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has adopted a mixed-method approach using semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire to explore PMT constructs' impact on women's feelings while seeking information on COVID-19. Several tests, such as standard deviation, mean, skewness, kurtosis and persons, were used to check the reliability of data and inter-relationships between constructs.

Findings

The study results show a significant positive correlation between PMT constructs (perceived vulnerability, perceived severity, response efficacy, self-efficacy and response cost) with the feelings of Arab women during information seeking on COVID-19. However, the relationship between threat appraisal and feelings during information seeking was more substantial than coping appraisal and feelings during information seeking. The researchers hope that this study creates a baseline of cross-cultural studies on PMT constructs' effect on women's feelings while seeking health information.

Research limitations/implications

The current study was conducted on female participants only. While the study intended to examine Arab women's feelings during information seeking with PMT's application, the results may be affected by other factors that were not considered in the current study. Furthermore, the questionnaire was distributed in three Arab countries, which means that the results cannot be generalized in other geographical contexts. Therefore, similar studies need to be conducted in larger geographical areas as cultural factors may produce different results.

Originality/value

This study explores women's feelings while seeking COVID-19 information using the PMT constructs. As far as we know, this study is the first study to investigate Arab women's feelings while seeking health information during pandemics. PMT utilization is considered a new approach to discover and measure informational needs and feelings associated with it during pandemics.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Qingxiong Weng, Kashmala Latif, Abdul Karim Khan, Hussain Tariq, Hirra Pervez Butt, Asfia Obaid and Naukhez Sarwar

This study aims to explore an interpersonal predictor of coworkers-directed knowledge hiding behavior – the leader–member exchange social comparison (LMXSC). This study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore an interpersonal predictor of coworkers-directed knowledge hiding behavior – the leader–member exchange social comparison (LMXSC). This study integrates leader–member exchange literature with social comparison theory to hypothesize that an individual’s upward LMXSC is positively correlated with coworkers-directed knowledge hiding and that an individual’s feelings of envy are mediated by the relationship between upward LMXSC and coworkers-directed knowledge hiding behavior. Also, this study proposes two-way and three-way interaction patterns of goal interdependence, which can influence LMXSC–envy relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Two independent studies are conducted to test the hypothesized relationships. In Study 1, the authors collected multi-wave data from a large public sector university in China (N = 1,131). The authors then replicated the Study 1 findings by collecting multi-source and multi-wave data from a telecom company based in China (n = 379).

Findings

The authors found support across both studies for the idea that upward LMXSC is a possible interpersonal predictor of coworkers-directed knowledge hiding behavior. More specifically, it was found that feelings of envy ensue from upward LMXSC, resulting in further coworkers-directed knowledge hiding behavior. Further, this study shows that the influence of upward LMXSC on knowledge hiding behavior via feelings of envy was weaker (stronger) when employees have high (low) cooperative goal interdependence with coworkers, respectively, and when employees have low (high) competitive goal interdependence with the coworkers, respectively.

Originality/value

This study extends current knowledge management literature by introducing LMXSC as an interpersonal predictor of coworkers-directed knowledge hiding behavior. This will help practitioners to curb such counterproductive behavior.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2020

Felix Boronczyk and Christoph Breuer

This study examines how brand attitude formation with respect to sport event sponsors is affected by feelings related to the sponsor brand, the sponsored event, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how brand attitude formation with respect to sport event sponsors is affected by feelings related to the sponsor brand, the sponsored event, and concurrent sponsors.

Design/methodology/approach

Using systematically manipulated press releases, 216 sport-interested participants were presented with different sponsorships of a major sport event. Sponsor information was systematically manipulated both within the stimulus text and the accompanying photo, which contained clearly visible sponsor signage. Participants' brand-related feelings and attitudes toward the stimulus brands were assessed through an online questionnaire following the treatment and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that sponsor brand-related feelings represent an important step in the creation of brand attitudes. Sponsor brand attitudes are further revealed to be in part determined by event- and co-sponsor-related feelings through several indirect pathways.

Practical implications

The findings presented in this study suggest that managers who seek to create favorable brand responses need to consider the feelings associated with their brands, the event and concurrent sponsors. Brands may experience both beneficial and detrimental effects, depending on whether the feelings involved are positive or negative.

Originality/value

To date, no research has investigated the relationships between brand-related feelings and brand attitudes in event sponsorship while accounting for the influence of the sponsored event and concurrent sponsors. Therefore, this study contributes to a better understanding of the role of feelings in sponsor brand attitude formation.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Jashim Khan, Gary Rivers, Sonjaya S. Gaur, Ali Quazi, Na Zuo and Sunil D. Bhatia

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating role of organisational harmony and fellow-feelings in the relationship between intelligence generations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating role of organisational harmony and fellow-feelings in the relationship between intelligence generations, dissemination and implementation on business performance and explain how market orientation impacts certain aspects of organisational behaviour which in turn lead to the performance of service firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set comprises 108 responses of senior managers within the logistics sector. The multi-level sequential mediation path analysis is used to examine the above mediating role.

Findings

Results indicate that intelligence dissemination (ID), response implementation (RI) and business performance relationship is significantly mediated via fellow-feelings and organisational harmony. However, the relationship between dissemination, implementation and overall business performance is mostly mediated by fellow-feelings and followed by organisational harmony. Furthermore, when overall market orientation (intelligence generation, dissemination and RI) is used as a determinant of business performance, organsiational harmony emerged as the most significant contributor to organsiational performance.

Practical implications

Managers are urged to focus on building fellow-feelings among their employees, resulting in a harmonious work environment between functional units and market orientation organisation wide.

Originality/value

Compared to previous research, this is one of the first attempts to develop an understanding of fellow-feelings, contributing to organsiational harmony resulting market orientation and, hence, business performance. Market orientation conceptualisations lump intelligence generation, dissemination and RI of business activities together but do not explain how market orientation impacts fellow-feelings and organisational harmony which in turn leads to performance. The authors specifically address this important lacuna in our conceptualisation and propose that ID and RI lead to fellow-feelings within functional departments and results in organisational harmony.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Simona Romani, Silvia Grappi and Richard P. Bagozzi

Very limited research exists examining envy from the viewpoint of an envied consumer, rather than an envier. This paper aims to address this gap by examining whether and…

Abstract

Purpose

Very limited research exists examining envy from the viewpoint of an envied consumer, rather than an envier. This paper aims to address this gap by examining whether and how the experience of being envied actually affects consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents three experiments. Study 1 investigates the ambivalent experience of being envied. Study 2 examines the effect of being envied in consumption contexts on consumer satisfaction, analyzing the combined ambivalent effects of positive and negative feelings. It also investigates the moderating role played by consumer coping responses to enviers (mitigation vs exacerbation). Finally, Study 3 applies the hypothesized model in a specific context (i.e. a material possession context), focusing on adult consumers.

Findings

Results show that negative (e.g. guilt and anxiety) and positive (e.g. sense of well-being and prestige) feelings for being envied depend on the type of relationship between the envier and the envied, and the type of desired object, and consumer satisfaction is driven by the combined ambivalent effects of positive and negative feelings, where coping responses by envied consumers moderate the effects of such feelings on satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper makes three main contributions: it extends prior research by highlighting the role of personal relationship factors and the type of object of desire in the experience of being envied; demonstrates that both positive and negative feelings of being envied affect consumer satisfaction; and shows conditions regulating the influence of positive and negative feelings on satisfaction, demonstrating that mitigation strategies decrease the effects of negative feelings on satisfaction, whereas exacerbation strategies failed to regulate the effects of positive feelings.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Margaret S. Stockdale, Declan O. Gilmer and Tuyen K. Dinh

The purpose of this paper is to examine two forms of power construal – self-focused and other-focused power – on effects of increasing or decreasing sex-based harassment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine two forms of power construal – self-focused and other-focused power – on effects of increasing or decreasing sex-based harassment (SBH) tendencies through feeling states triggered by imagining these different types of power. In addition, dispositional traits associated with either self- and other-focused power were tested as moderators of these paths.

Design/methodology/approach

An online experiment was conducted with 549 US adults (58 percent men) who were randomly assigned to imagine themselves with self-focused power, other-focused power or control. Dispositional measures were completed before priming; and feelings of sexiness, powerfulness and communalism were completed after priming. Then, participants completed either modified versions of Pryor’s (1987) Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale or Williams et al.’s (2017) Workplace Crush Scenario.

Findings

Moderated indirect effects indicated that self-focused power increased participants’ feelings of sexiness and powerfulness, which, in turn, increased either measure of SBH. However, these indirect effects were only significant for individuals low in Dark Triad traits (Machiavellianism, narcissism and psychopathy). Surprisingly, other-focused power priming indirectly increased SBH tendencies through communal feelings.

Research limitations/implications

Moral licensing may explain the unexpected effect of other-focused power on SBH. Organizational leaders should monitor the damaging effects of both forms of power.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine how both negative and positive power construals affect harassment tendencies and to document potential nefarious effects for both types of power.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Nicholas S.K. Pang

Based on a sample of 101 teachers from 14 aided secondary schools in Hong Kong, a survey was conducted in March‐April 1994 to collect data about organizational values in…

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Abstract

Based on a sample of 101 teachers from 14 aided secondary schools in Hong Kong, a survey was conducted in March‐April 1994 to collect data about organizational values in schools and teachers’ feelings. Two new instruments, the “School values inventory” and the “Teachers’ feelings questionnaire”, were developed for this study. Using LISREL computer program to analyse the data, builds a linear structural equation model of school values and teachers’ feelings. The result is a LISREL model of school values and teachers’ feelings which indicates that cultural linkage in schools promotes teachers’ feelings of commitment, job satisfaction, sense of community and order and discipline, whereas bureaucratic linkage undermines such feelings. Implies that school principals should resort more to cultural linkages as the strategies to bind people together and to give people meaning in their work.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Terje Slåtten

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between: two extreme points of discrete types of emotions (“joy” and “frustration”); two types of managerial…

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2864

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between: two extreme points of discrete types of emotions (“joy” and “frustration”); two types of managerial practices (“reward” and “empowerment”); and employee‐perceived service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model of the aforementioned relationships has been presented, along with hypotheses on these relationships and collected data with a survey study frontline employees in service organizations. This paper has analyzed the data in order to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate that employees' feelings of joy and frustration explain more of the variance in employee‐perceived service quality than managerial practices, i.e. “reward” and “empowerment.” Specifically, employees' feelings of frustration are found to be detrimental for employee‐perceived service quality.

Research limitations/implications

This paper limits its focus to two types of managerial practices and two distinct feelings.

Practical implications

The paper has demonstrated the importance for managers to consider how their practices influence the service quality that their employees provide to customers. In particular, managers should be aware of employee's feeling of joy or frustration because of its role in explaining employee‐perceived service quality.

Originality/value

The paper has developed and tested an original conceptual model of a relatively unexplored area of services management.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Riitta Hekkala and Mari-Klara Stein

This study examines emotionologies (Stearns & Stearns, 1985), that is, attitudes that members of an inter-organizational information systems (IOIS) project hold toward…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines emotionologies (Stearns & Stearns, 1985), that is, attitudes that members of an inter-organizational information systems (IOIS) project hold toward emotions and their appropriate expression and regulation in this project. In order to understand attitudes toward emotions and emotion regulation, we suggest the adoption of the concept of emotion structure, consisting of emotion rules and resources (Callahan, 2004).

Methodology/approach

To investigate the kinds of emotionologies present in this IOIS development project, we have chosen a qualitative case study approach. Our data consists of 41 qualitative interviews, collected in two phases.

Findings

We trace how emotion rules and corresponding emotion regulation strategies change among the sub-groups working in the project throughout their first year of collaborating. We show that organizational actors are skilled emotion managers, whose behavior is guided not only by many collective emotion rules (professional, organizational, social) but also by personal emotion rules. Our findings also suggest the need to critically reflect on certain emotion rules, such as those pertaining to the expression of fear and anger, and their potential positive and negative implications on project work.

Research implications

We argue that group emotionologies with their professional, organizational, and social emotion rules interact with personal emotion rules, resulting in interesting emotion regulation strategies that often try to minimize emotional dissonance, sometimes at the expense of risking open conflict among project members. With this in mind, one theoretical and practical suggestion is to further explore the potential constructive implications of experiencing and expressing fear in projects.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Christina Kirsch, Warren Parry and Cameron Peake

In order to gain a deeper understanding of how emotional dynamics play out in organizations, a better understanding of the underlying structure of emotions in the…

Abstract

In order to gain a deeper understanding of how emotional dynamics play out in organizations, a better understanding of the underlying structure of emotions in the workplace is needed. This study set out to investigate the emotional reality of work teams that are confronted with organizational change and to create a feeling scale that can be used to analyze and evaluate the emotional experience of employees involved in and affected by the change. This chapter outlines the results of an iterative statistical analysis to determine the underlying structure of emotions and basic dimensions on which emotions can be categorized. Feeling scales ranging in length from 22 to 42 feeling items were answered by up to 26,900 respondents as part of employee surveys that were used to investigate the subjective perception of organizational change. Factor analysis and self-organizing maps (SOMs) analysis were used in order to cluster and differentiate the underlying basic categories of emotions. The results show that feelings are mainly differentiated as either positive or negative and that those two main factors consist of seven underlying categories, which are summarized as the emotion scales: “Passion,” “Drive,” “Curiosity,” “Defiance,” “Anger,” “Fear and Distress,” and “Damage.” The basic dimensions of the emotions were “hedonic tone” and “affective focus.”

Details

Emotions and Organizational Dynamism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-177-1

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