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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Aimée deChambeau, Ian McCullough, Melanie McGurr and Mike Monaco

This chapter discusses hurdles posed to a medium-sized public university library in the Midwest when they were asked by their Dean to create a faculty workload worksheet…

Abstract

This chapter discusses hurdles posed to a medium-sized public university library in the Midwest when they were asked by their Dean to create a faculty workload worksheet, rationale, and ultimately a set of guidelines. Faculty in other departments compute their loads using formulas based on course loads. How many hours they spend in the classroom, and how many hours they spend preparing for that time in the classroom are factored into the course loads expected for a full teaching load, with release granted in course load equivalents for research and/or service. Because librarian work does not typically involve teaching credit-bearing courses, a major challenge to constructing guidelines is equating library work with course loads. Calculating faculty workload for librarians commensurate with other faculty on campus is often complicated. To all of these challenges add the unique issues that are faced by the technical services (TS) librarian. TS work supports instruction and research but may involve little classroom contact with students, so it has even less resemblance to classroom instruction than other librarian work has. TS librarians spend their time in a wide variety of tasks. Exactly how to formulate this time in accordance with the rules for other departmental faculty is a challenge. The specific situation at this university added more complications as there was also a campus-wide mandate to ensure all workload policies are consistent and equitable.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Abstract

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Technical Services in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-829-3

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Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Samantha Schmehl Hines

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Technical Services in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-829-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Kay Womack and Karen Rupp‐Serrano

Many libraries utilize graduate assistants in a variety of programmatic areas. Little research, however, has been conducted as to how such students are recruited, selected…

Abstract

Many libraries utilize graduate assistants in a variety of programmatic areas. Little research, however, has been conducted as to how such students are recruited, selected and employed. Reports the results of a survey of main and undergraduate library reference departments at US academic institutions conferring an ALA‐accredited MLIS or equivalent degree. The survey solicited information about the employment of graduate assistants in such departments in six areas: recruitment, appointment, training, assignments, supervision and evaluation.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Stephen H. Aby

Faculty unionization is growing, and library faculty members are included in many collective bargaining units. Yet there is a dearth of information on how well collective…

Abstract

Faculty unionization is growing, and library faculty members are included in many collective bargaining units. Yet there is a dearth of information on how well collective bargaining contracts address the sometimes unique nature of library faculty work. This article explores contracts in a number of Ohio universities and from selective institutions around the country to see how well they accommodate the professional and work-related needs of librarians. Major contractual issues addressed include governance, academic freedom, workload, salary, and the retention, tenure, and promotion (RTP) of faculty, among others.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-580-2

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Sandra Shropshire, Jenny Lynne Semenza and Karen Kearns

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive assessment of promotion and tenure for librarians in light of increased scrutiny and expectations by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive assessment of promotion and tenure for librarians in light of increased scrutiny and expectations by the administration of Idaho State University (ISU). This increased rigour was prompted by a move up in the Carnegie Classification System.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was performed using library databases, as well as assessing peer institution promotion and tenure documents. Additionally ongoing feedback from University administrators was solicited. The process took for the creation of a new promotion and tenure document for ISU library took two years from the beginning of the project to the final approved document.

Findings

The study found a dearth of performance benchmarks in both literature and peer institution policies and required the authors, along with other library faculty, to create evidence based benchmarks for ISU aligned with traditional standards of teaching, research and service.

Originality/value

This paper is an inclusive assessment of the literature on faculty promotion and tenure, the policies of ISU’s peer institutions, and the change of Carnegie Classification’s impact on the ISU policies.

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Judith A. Downie

The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion of the role of government information librarians in the design and implementation of information literacy instruction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion of the role of government information librarians in the design and implementation of information literacy instruction. Increased accessibility to government information through the internet is bringing all librarians into increased contact with government information, thereby becoming ad hoc documents librarians. Through collaboration with experts in government information, shared knowledge results in opportunities for richer and more comprehensive information literacy instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

This review examines evidence of commonality and collaboration between librarians through content analysis of both general and specialized library publications.

Findings

Collaboration is a common practice in library instruction to share workload and expertise, yet most literature on this practice focuses on librarianfaculty collaborative efforts. Limited evidence exists for collaboration between librarians and a severely limited body of literature exists when examining instructional design collaboration to include government information in information literacy instruction.

Practical implications

Collaborative instruction proactively addresses resolving perceived barriers and expands instruction resource repertoires and shares workloads.

Originality/value

Examination of the collaborative process between librarians is infrequent. This adds to the body of literature and increases awareness of additional resources in the provision of information literacy instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Ryan MacNeil and Britanie Wentzell

Although a great deal has been written about the challenges and opportunities for collaboration between librarians and professors in higher education, most recommendations…

Abstract

Although a great deal has been written about the challenges and opportunities for collaboration between librarians and professors in higher education, most recommendations for faculty–library collaboration are written by librarians, published in librarian-oriented venues, and rely on second-hand accounts of professorial perceptions and experiences. Dialogue between librarians and professors is missing. In this chapter, the authors present a duoethnographic inquiry into a librarian–professor collaboration: the authors collaboratively examine their four years working together on the senior seminar course “Small Business Management” at Acadia University, Canada. In considering the evolution of their course and their collaboration, the authors reflect on six dimensions of their experiences: the way their collaboration has shaped the course learning outcomes, the value the authors have derived from collaboratively reflexive teaching, the workload tensions the authors have navigated, the challenge of “fitting in,” and the role of library champion. The authors then conclude with four insights from their professorial–librarian collaboration that might be transferable to other contexts of higher education: the importance of openness, collegiality, time for collaboration, and attention to the cultural gaps between professorship and librarianship.

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International Perspectives on Improving Student Engagement: Advances in Library Practices in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-453-8

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

David Brennan and M. Elizabeth Davidson

While the important role of information literacy instruction as a central service in academic libraries is well observed in scholarly literature, there has been little…

Abstract

While the important role of information literacy instruction as a central service in academic libraries is well observed in scholarly literature, there has been little examination of the impact of the rapid increase of instructional duties on practicing librarians, whose traditional instruction duties have expanded or whose positions have not traditionally required leading a classroom. The study in this chapter explores librarians’ perceptions of the impact that increased instruction tasks have had on their day-to-day and long-term goals, perceptions of the support they receive in performing their instructional duties, and what types of instruction training they have received throughout their career. The ways in which the addition of instruction duties for librarians have been perceived by the librarians themselves as they strive to increase support for instructional services without impacting the library’s ability to continue to perform traditional public and technical services functions is discussed as a marker of the future needs of the field and the necessity of recognizing professional strain.

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Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Stella Ngozi Anasi

The purpose of this study is to investigate the composite influence of perceived work relationship, work load and physical work environment on the job satisfaction of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the composite influence of perceived work relationship, work load and physical work environment on the job satisfaction of librarians in South-West, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a descriptive survey design. A multi-stage sampling technique was used for this study. The instrument used for data collection was a self-structured questionnaire, and a total of 102 academic librarians responded to the questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that there is a significant linear relationship among work relationship, workload, work environment and job satisfaction. Among the variables examined, workload is not a statistically significant predictor of the job satisfaction of librarians, but work relationship and work environment have a statistically significant relative effect on the job satisfaction of librarians.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies should evaluate the causal link between work relationships, work load and work environment on job satisfaction using randomized control.

Practical implications

The important result in this study is that there is a significant linear relationship among work relationship, workload, work environment and job satisfaction; therefore, if these factors are adequately taken care of, there will be increased employee motivation, reduced staff turnover and increased job satisfaction among librarians in Nigerian universities. The university library management could take advantage of workshops and seminars on how to build and maintain work relationship and work environment (hygiene factors) to improve employees’ job satisfaction. The seminars and workshop will increase the knowledge of university library management on how to develop coherent friendly co-workers policy practices and workload policy practices to enhance the job satisfaction of librarians in public universities in Nigeria. Librarians should be assigned tasks that are moderately demanding because both overload and under load could lead to job dissatisfaction. Regarding research, this study offered a basis for a continuing debate on work relationship, organizational relationships, work environment, work load and job satisfaction.

Originality/value

Despite the growing global concern for workers well-being in organizations, not much attention has been given to the influence of workplace relationship, work load and work environment on the job satisfaction of librarians in Nigeria. Thus, the results of this research contribute to the body of knowledge regarding job satisfaction among librarians and provide significant evidence on the influence of work relationship, work load and work environment on the job satisfaction of librarians.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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