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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2010

Stephen Wheeler, Kay C. Carnes and Cynthia Firey Eakin

This chapter examines staffing trends for Beta Alpha Psi (BAP) advisors over the past 20 years to document the degree of tenure- versus nontenure-track faculty

Abstract

This chapter examines staffing trends for Beta Alpha Psi (BAP) advisors over the past 20 years to document the degree of tenure- versus nontenure-track faculty involvement. We surveyed faculty advisors to determine how they are compensated for their BAP service. Our findings show a significant increase in the percentage of nontenure-track faculty filling the role of BAP advisor. Additionally, few advisors appear to receive pecuniary benefits for their service, and nearly one-third receive no reimbursement from their institutions for BAP-related expenses that they incur. We discuss the implications of these findings and their potential for limiting BAP's ability to execute future strategic initiatives.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-292-1

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2023

Junaid Akhtar and Iqra Abdullah

The aim of the case is to understand the performance management system of academic staff members in higher education institution. Furthermore, students would be able to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The aim of the case is to understand the performance management system of academic staff members in higher education institution. Furthermore, students would be able to compare two performance appraisal policies and analyze which one could better serve the purpose considering the context of educational institution. The case would help students understand the performance dynamics of the academic staff and how the performance management system in place affect employees.

Case overview/synopsis

The case study presents a troubling situation faced by Asim Khan, a newly appointed director of the Midland University, regarding retention of the faculty. Upon joining Midland, Khan noticed a trend that faculty who was serving the university from many years are leaving the organization one after the other. He decided to revise the faculty policies that he believed was the root cause of faculty turnover in Midland. He formulated a committee to review the existing policies and revamp if required. The committee identified some flaws in the faculty appraisal policy in place at that time and formulated a new one with the consultation of top management. However, when the new appraisal policy was presented to the faculty, few faculty members raised their eyes over a few aspects of the proposed policy. As the new academic year was approaching, Khan had to make an important decision after critically analyzing the pros and cons of both policies that which of the two should be followed for the upcoming year’s appraisals.

Complexity academic level

The case can potentially be used in the post-graduate courses in MBA programs offering a major in human resource management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 6: Human resource management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2023

Haider Madani, Ajay Adhikari and Christopher Hodgdon

This study aims to leverage the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology framework developed by Venkatesh et al. (2003) to explore the factors influencing faculty

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to leverage the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology framework developed by Venkatesh et al. (2003) to explore the factors influencing faculty willingness and acceptance of online teaching at a major Saudi Arabian university as we move to a post-COVID-19 new normal.

Design/methodology/approach

We surveyed business school faculty from a major Saudi Arabian university that transitioned to online learning because of the COVID-19 lockdown. We used partial least square structural equation modeling to examine the factors that impact faculty satisfaction and behavioral intention to continue using online teaching in the future.

Findings

The results of the study indicated that when faculty perceive that e-learning improves their teaching performance and effectiveness (performance expectancy) and find that online teaching tools are relatively easy to use (effort expectancy), then they are more open to considering online teaching and using digital tools even after the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses a Saudi Arabian sample, so the results of the study may not be generalizable to other countries. The study was cross-sectional in nature; a longitudinal design would help in uncovering more stable relationships and enabling us to draw stronger conclusions. Lastly, the sample size for the study was relatively small, resulting in a loss of power in statistical testing. Notwithstanding these limitations, our study contributes to a greater understanding and appreciation of faculty acceptance of online teaching as we progress to a post-COVID-19 new normal. As such, it should be useful to educators, institutions and policymakers as they seek to reimagine business education going forward.

Originality/value

The present study is one of the first scholarly studies to focus on exploring e-learning acceptance in a business school from a faculty perspective, considering the natural experiment that forced institutions to move to online teaching irrespective of their prior acceptance or experience with this teaching modality.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2022

Mark E. Haskins

This article highlights and discusses numerous, specific leadership attributes that contribute greatly to enabling a university faculty member to be an effective leader of…

Abstract

Purpose

This article highlights and discusses numerous, specific leadership attributes that contribute greatly to enabling a university faculty member to be an effective leader of a group of their peers. As such, this article provides additional insights into the important construct of “transcollegial leadership” (Burns and Mooney, 2018).

Design/methodology/approach

The personal “reflections on practice” (Schon, 1983) presented here are based on 40+ years of observing and experiencing university faculty leading groups of peers as well as numerous personal experiences of serving in such a leadership role.

Findings

This article presents a robust array of specific, real-world-based insights that can contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of a leader of peers in a higher education institutional setting. Moreover, the ideas presented are offered to leaders of academic institutions as foci for potential faculty development initiatives and discussions. The ideas presented are clustered into six categories – process, resolve, integrity, mindset, excitement/energy, and respect.

Practical implications

The actions and ideas presented pertaining to a university faculty member's capability to effectively lead a group of peers are widely and immediately actionable. The insights presented are also amenable to ongoing faculty development activities and discussions.

Originality/value

This article addresses the common challenge of effectively leading a group of one's faculty peers in an academic setting. As such, the article extends and embellishes the conceptual, institutional-level perspective presented by Burns and Mooney (2018) in this journal.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2022

Paulina Segarra, Cristian E. Villanueva and Lorena Martínez

In this article, the authors aim to achieve a deeper understanding of the aspects that influence academic faculty's subjective well-being (SWB). For this purpose, the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, the authors aim to achieve a deeper understanding of the aspects that influence academic faculty's subjective well-being (SWB). For this purpose, the authors focus on scholars who work in a business school that not only is located in Latin America, but is in a transition process, changing from being solely a teaching-oriented to a research-oriented model due to Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with professors at a private business school in Mexico. The interviews took place between November 2018 and late 2020.

Findings

Scholars of business schools who are transitioning from being teaching-oriented to becoming research-oriented in order to comply with AACSB requirements face heightened institutional pressures that can generate negative effects on professors' SWB; especially on three dimensions: health, a sense of lack of self-efficacy and apprehension due to the lack of resources.

Research limitations/implications

This paper studied a particular context; however, even when the findings of this article are relevant, they cannot be generalized, as each context will have its own peculiarities.

Originality/value

More attention needs to be given to scholars' SWB, particularly of those working in business schools located in the Global South. This is especially relevant since faculty members of business schools in emerging economies are aiming to compete in the international arena; therefore, they face heightened institutional pressures since they need to be more academically productive without neglecting teaching and administrative tasks and despite having less access to resources than their counterparts working in business schools in developed economies. The authors believe that hearing researchers' stories about their concerns and desires can raise awareness and lead to better work conditions.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2022

Deepika Pandita and V.V. Ravi Kumar

This research aims to combine and extend the literature on the self-monitoring approach used by faculty members in online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic using the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to combine and extend the literature on the self-monitoring approach used by faculty members in online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) model. The study also highlights the challenges faced by faculty members in online teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a mixed methodology approach, the primary data was obtained from the faculty members of the post-graduate business schools. This data enabled the measurement of self-monitoring adopted by the faculty members and the relationship of the factors by using the TAM model. Multivariate regression was adopted to study the relationships between the elements in the TAM model and faculty members’ self-monitoring. Secondly, a few exploratory questions were asked to the respondents about the challenges faced by them during online teaching.

Findings

The quantitative analysis conducted using multiple regression directed that the faculty’s contentment with any digital platform influenced their engagement, attention and participation while taking an online class as a part of the self-monitoring process. The perception of the technology platforms used for online teaching affected the faculty members’ self-monitoring dimensions: attention, participation and engagement. Based on the qualitative approach, the thematic analysis pointed out five major challenges for faculty members in conducting online classes: I.T. support, hesitation, interaction with peers and students, proficiency with an online platform and evaluation challenges.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted during the complete lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic; many faculty members were initially trained to get familiarized with the online teaching platforms and educate students. Hence, this study enriches the literature on online teaching during pandemic times.

Practical implications

To ensure that the faculty impacts quality online education and the students obtain the knowledge and skills required, faculty need to alter their pedagogy based on the technology they use to focus on their students’ teaching, learning and needs.

Originality/value

This study measures self-monitoring and its dimensions for faculty members, which is unique in nature. This was the first time the faculty members were imposed with the responsibility of online teaching and ensuring that the learning-teaching process was fruitful. This study has both-theoretical and practical implications as the paper focuses on various insights which can make online teaching-learning more effective.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2022

Brandy Pieper and Masha Krsmanovic

The purpose of this study is to examine whether implicit bias exists within the graduate admissions process at a large public research university in the Southeast United…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether implicit bias exists within the graduate admissions process at a large public research university in the Southeast United States. Additionally, this research sought to identify the type of strategies graduate faculty in the USA use to assess their implicit bias and the support they may need to better recognize and gauge implicit bias during the graduate application review process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the use of a qualitative, phenomenological research design by conducting individual interviews with graduate faculty members that serve on admissions committees.

Findings

The findings revealed six themes in relation to the purpose of the study – bias recognition, faculty perceptions of their own bias, faculty perceptions on the bias of others, strategies for the application review process, admission committee safeguards and the need for implicit bias training.

Originality/value

The study outcomes are discussed in relation to the prior research and literature on this phenomenon. Additionally, the study presents research and practical implications, including actionable strategies for how its results can be practically applied.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Sabrina Kramer and Spencer Benson

– The purpose of this paper is to develop and assess a faculty development program targeted at pedagogically sound integration of technology by faculty into their courses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and assess a faculty development program targeted at pedagogically sound integration of technology by faculty into their courses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper developed a program that combines a summer training institute and a yearlong faculty learning community. This program is supported by instructional technology and faculty development experts, and rewards the participants both with a stipend and with acknowledgement. To assess the effectiveness of this program, the paper used electronic anonymous surveys during the middle and end of the program.

Findings

Self-reported evaluations suggests that the alumni of the 2011-2012 cohort will continue to develop and adapt technologies in their course, and would encourage their colleagues to do the same. In addition, the majority report that the program has changed the way they see and use technology in the classroom. Additional observations about the program alumni's involvement in continuing efforts to improve teaching with technology indicate that this program may be having an effect beyond the individual participants.

Research limitations/implications

Assessment of the program was limited to only one year, and needs to continue to evaluate the program and the faculty after they leave the program.

Practical implications

This program provides a possible model to implement change at a university, on teaching with technology, or other teaching- and learning-related topics.

Originality/value

In a world where there are increasing expectations of technology in teaching, a successful model of faculty development which produces an increase in pedagogically sound faculty adoption of teaching technology is a valuable one to higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Paul Verhaegen

To provide insight into the relevant factors for faculty recruitment and retention that can help leadership of business schools to design and implement a tailored policy…

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Abstract

Purpose

To provide insight into the relevant factors for faculty recruitment and retention that can help leadership of business schools to design and implement a tailored policy to recruit and retain academic talent in a highly competitive and international market.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys were sent out in parallel to deans/directors and faculty of 181 European business schools. A total of 42 important factors were selected and ranked in order of importance for both recruitment and retention of academic talent. In addition the faculty were asked to indicate to what extent they are satisfied with each of the factors in their current situation. Deans/directors were asked to indicate to what extent they felt able to influence each of the factors.

Findings

Factors of crucial importance for recruitment and retention were identified, both from the deans and from the faculty perspective. Perception gaps occurred between deans and faculty, as well as satisfaction gaps on important factors: this led to the identification of interesting policy problems and opportunities. Segmentation of the sample facilitated the demonstration of differences in perception between groups of faculty according to gender, age and rank, and between groups of schools according to legal structure, orientation, enrolment, and accreditation status.

Research limitations/implications

Deans/directors of 69 European schools and 350 faculty members in 12 countries completed the survey. The database could be further enlarged to make more detailed analysis possible. Expanding the research to include schools of other continents would enable one to analyse cross‐continent differences between business schools.

Practical implications

The developed framework and the data provide an excellent opportunity for business schools' leadership to analyze the effectiveness of its policy and benchmark the school against a selected peer group.

Originality/value

The survey and the developed framework for analysis are unique and, in this form, have never been done before. The value of the paper is that it presents unique evidence on important factors crucial to faculty management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Nicholas Lonergan

The purpose of this study was to determine faculty preferences and attitudes regarding reference management software (RMS) to improve the library’s support and training programs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine faculty preferences and attitudes regarding reference management software (RMS) to improve the library’s support and training programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A short, online survey was emailed to approximately 272 faculty.

Findings

Survey results indicated that multiple RMS were in use, with faculty preferring Zotero over the library-supported RefWorks. More than 40 per cent did not use any RMS.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively short length of the survey precluded a more detailed investigation of faculty attitudes. The 20 per cent response rate, although typical of surveys of this type, may over-represent those faculty who have strong attitudes toward RMS. These findings support the necessity of doing more research to establish the parameters of the RMS environment among faculty, with implications for support, instruction and outreach at the institutional level.

Practical implications

Surveys should be conducted to establish local faculty RMS usage and preferences, as they may differ from both published findings and local expectations. Because it is unlikely that faculty will overwhelmingly use one RMS, libraries should plan to support multiple RMS.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to investigate the issue of RMS faculty preferences in a liberal arts setting.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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