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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2022

Tunan Chen, Fengxiang Ma, Yue Zhao, Zhenghai Liao, Zongjia Qiu and Guoqiang Zhang

This paper aims to establish a photoacoustic detection system for SO2 using UV-LED and testify its feasibility for sensitive measurement. The work in this paper can avoid…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish a photoacoustic detection system for SO2 using UV-LED and testify its feasibility for sensitive measurement. The work in this paper can avoid potential crossover interference in infrared (IR) range and also balance the capability and cost of feasible excitation for photoacoustic detection system.

Design/methodology/approach

In this experimental work, a cantilever-enhanced–based photoacoustic SO2 detection system using an ultraviolet (UV) LED light source with a light power of 4 mW as the excitation was established.

Findings

A feasible photoacoustic detection system for SO2 using UV-LED was established. Experimental results demonstrate that the detection limit of the system can reach the level of 0.667 ppm, which can serve as a reference for the application of PAS in insulation fault diagnosis.

Originality/value

This work investigated the potential of using ultraviolet photoacoustic spectroscopy to detect trace SO2, which provided an ideal replacement of infrared-laser-based detection system. In this paper, a photoacoustic detection system using LED with a low light power was established. Low light power requirement can expand the options of light sources accordingly. In this paper, the absorption characteristics of SO2 in the presented detection system and ultraviolet range were studied. And the detection limit of the presented system was given. Both of which can provide reference to SO2 detection in ambient SF6.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Nitin Bhaurao Raut and Gweneth Gorman

The interruption of on-campus teaching and learning, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, forced universities around the globe to rethink their pedagogical models and adopt…

Abstract

Purpose

The interruption of on-campus teaching and learning, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, forced universities around the globe to rethink their pedagogical models and adopt innovative strategies and approaches that enabled continuity of learning. Engineering schools and faculties were faced with the challenge of how to continue to engage students with the practical component of coursework, especially in terms of lab work and experimentation, which are mandatory requirements for degree awards.

Design/methodology/approach

This study documents how the Faculty of Engineering in a university in Oman engaged students with the practical component of their course during the pandemic by launching the remote DoIt@Home Lab. The DoIt@Home Lab approach included the design and development of video recorded labs, virtual labs, simulation exercises and DoIt@Home experiments which were provided to students as teaching tools and guides to conducting home experiments remotely.

Findings

This study presents the DoIt@Home Lab approach introduced to Year 2 Chemistry for engineering students. Students' grades improved by 11% over the previous year when the course was delivered face-to-face. Failure rates dropped by 8% while the number of students earning a 3.25 grade point average (GPA) or higher increased by 18%.

Originality/value

The DoIt@Home Lab for engineering courses could enhance students' learning experience and create an effective remote learning environment. While the DoIt@Home Lab was created to supplement on-campus activity in the event of a temporary disruption, it can also be used to supplement regular face-to-face program delivery.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Jiju Antony

Industrial experiments have shown an unprecedented success for improving the product and process quality in many manufacturing organisations. This paper provides some…

856

Abstract

Industrial experiments have shown an unprecedented success for improving the product and process quality in many manufacturing organisations. This paper provides some useful and practical tips to industrial engineers with limited knowledge in experimental design (ED) for making industrial experiments successful in their own organisations. ED is a powerful tool which can be used to achieve breakthrough improvements in product quality and process effectiveness. The purpose of the paper is to stimulate the engineering community to start applying ED for tackling quality control problems in key processes they are dealing with everyday.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2009

Natasha A. Frost and Todd R. Clear

Prison populations in the United States have increased in every year since 1973 – during depressions and in times of economic growth, with rising and falling crime rates…

Abstract

Prison populations in the United States have increased in every year since 1973 – during depressions and in times of economic growth, with rising and falling crime rates, and in times of war and peace. Accomplishing this historically unprecedented penal pattern has required a serious policy agenda that has remained focused on punishment as a goal for more than a generation. This paper seeks to understand that policy orientation from the framework of a social experiment. It explores the following questions: how does the penal experiment – which we have called the Punishment Imperative – compare to other “grand” social experiments? What were its assumptions? What forms did the experiment take? What lessons can be learned from it? What is the future of the grand social experiment in mass incarceration?

Details

Special Issue New Perspectives on Crime and Criminal Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-653-9

Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2006

Matthew A. Halloran, James M. Walker and Arlington W. Williams

This paper examines binding multi-round commitments (MRCs) to the group account in a repeated voluntary contributions mechanism (VCM) game. Before each five-round…

Abstract

This paper examines binding multi-round commitments (MRCs) to the group account in a repeated voluntary contributions mechanism (VCM) game. Before each five-round interval, subjects in a four-person group are given the option to commit a portion of their endowments to the group account for each of the next five rounds. Decision rounds proceed, with each subject's commitment acting as the binding minimum of his group-account allocation for each round. The opportunity to make MRCs does not increase mean allocations to the group account relative to a control treatment. However, commitments do have implications for reciprocal behavior within groups, leading to higher outcome variances across groups in the MRCs treatment.

Details

Experiments Investigating Fundraising and Charitable Contributors
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-301-3

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Christa Breum Amhøj

This chapter suggests that welfare management is becoming a matter of being able to use the open space in between formal roles, silos and organisations to actualise a not…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter suggests that welfare management is becoming a matter of being able to use the open space in between formal roles, silos and organisations to actualise a not yet possible, qualitatively better welfare here and now. The discourse about the open-ended and futuristic space in between is challenging practices of welfare education. A growing field of studies is criticising the centres of education, learning and research for being a McDonald’s culture, with an overly linear approach, unable to connect passion, sensitivity and intuition with knowledge. This chapter goes further than criticising existing practices. Building on notions of affective studies, the aim is to experiment on how to shift the focus from thinking about open spaces to intensifying thinking-spaces, able to generate the processual relations increasing the opportunity for a qualitative better welfare to occur here and now.

Design/methodology/approach

The object of the chapter is an experiment entitled The Future Public Leadership Education Now. It is based on non-representational studies and designed to operate on the affective registers.

Findings

The chapter offers a theoretical and pragmatic wandering as wondering. It continues and expands the experiment as an ongoing thinking-spaces moving between the known and the unknown. It aims at gently opening the opportunity for a qualitatively better welfare to occur.

Practical implications

Researchers become welfare artists intensifying affective co-motions as ongoing and form-shifting processes.

Details

Developing Public Managers for a Changing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-080-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2005

Andreas Ortmann

The results of standard lab experiments have long been questioned because of the convenience samples of subjects they typically employ and the abstract nature of the lab…

Abstract

The results of standard lab experiments have long been questioned because of the convenience samples of subjects they typically employ and the abstract nature of the lab settings. These two characteristics of experimental economics, it is argued, are the key factors that endanger the external validity of experiments.

Researchers have tried to address these issues by bringing the lab to non-traditional subjects including participants in remote locations, and/or by moving the setting of experiments closer to reality by using real goods and/or settings that are not stripped of context.

While field experiments might help experimental economists to increase the external validity of their investigations, these potential benefits might come at costs that can be considerable. Specifically, going into the field can dramatically increase the demands on, and challenges to, experimental control. This is particularly true for experiments in small-scale societies in remote locations on which I focus in this article.

Details

Field Experiments in Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-174-3

Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Les Kirkup

A review of the first year physics laboratory program in 1991 at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) revealed that student laboratory experiences did not: resemble…

Abstract

A review of the first year physics laboratory program in 1991 at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) revealed that student laboratory experiences did not: resemble the practice of physicists; give a realistic picture of the contribution of physics to everyday life, or; enhance students’ capabilities of broad value, such as their communication skills. Physics academics at UTS committed themselves to reforming students’ laboratory experiences with inquiry-oriented learning as a center-piece of the reform. This chapter explores the drivers that led to the reconceptualization of the role of the laboratory in the undergraduate curriculum and the strategies and processes we adopted over more than 20 years to embed inquiry-oriented activities into first year physics laboratory programs.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (Stem) Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-850-2

Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2005

Glenn W. Harrison

If we are to examine the role of “controls” in different experimental settings, it is appropriate that the word be defined carefully. The Oxford English Dictionary (Second

Abstract

If we are to examine the role of “controls” in different experimental settings, it is appropriate that the word be defined carefully. The Oxford English Dictionary (Second Edition) defines the verb “control” in the following manner: “To exercise restraint or direction upon the free action of; to hold sway over, exercise power or authority over; to dominate, command.” So the word means something more active and interventionist than is suggested by it’s colloquial clinical usage. Control can include such mundane things as ensuring sterile equipment in a chemistry lab, to restrain the free flow of germs and unwanted particles that might contaminate some test.

Details

Field Experiments in Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-174-3

Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Olivier Armantier and Amadou Boly

This chapter examines the external validity of lab experiments on corruption by evaluating the extent to which experimental results are robust to the degree of field…

Abstract

This chapter examines the external validity of lab experiments on corruption by evaluating the extent to which experimental results are robust to the degree of field context included in the experimental design. To do so, we follow Harrison and List (2004) and partition corruption experiments into four classes depending on their field context. A comparison of the results obtained within each class reveals that similar treatment effects tend to emerge. Although a definitive answer to the external validity question has yet to be provided, these preliminary results provide some support to the external validity of lab experiments on corruption.

Details

New Advances in Experimental Research on Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-785-7

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