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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Johannes Bauer, Dagmar Festner, Hans Gruber, Christian Harteis and Helmut Heid

Epistemological beliefs are fundamental assumptions about the nature of knowledge and learning. Research in university contexts has shown that they affect the ways and…

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Abstract

Epistemological beliefs are fundamental assumptions about the nature of knowledge and learning. Research in university contexts has shown that they affect the ways and results of student learning. This article transfers the concept of epistemological beliefs on workplace learning. The basic assumption is that employees' epistemological beliefs affect whether they perceive their workplace as learning environments. A study was conducted in which the interrelation of employees' epistemological beliefs with their appraisal of the workplace as supportive for learning was investigated. Additionally, the role of professional hierarchical levels concerning work‐related epistemological beliefs was analyzed. No significant interrelation between epistemological beliefs and workplace appraisal was found. Groups from different professional hierarchical levels did not differ in their workplace appraisal. Consequences about future research about the role of epistemological for workplace learning are discussed.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Emma L. Tickle, Joanne Brownlee and Di Nailon

To review conceptual links between research on personal epistemological beliefs and leadership behaviours associated with the transformational‐transactional leadership model.

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Abstract

Purpose

To review conceptual links between research on personal epistemological beliefs and leadership behaviours associated with the transformational‐transactional leadership model.

Design/methodology/approach

Transformational leaders act as facilitators of learning in organisations, and therefore their beliefs, cognitions and behaviours can be explored in the same manner as teachers in classroom settings. Research on both personal epistemological beliefs and the transformational‐transactional leadership model is reviewed and key conceptual links are identified in the areas of underlying beliefs, metacognition and cognition, and implications for training.

Findings

The literature review suggests that strong conceptual links exist between mature personal epistemology and beliefs and behaviours associated with transformational leadership. Similarly, conceptual links exist between less mature personal epistemology and beliefs and behaviours associated with transactional leadership.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper that will require further empirical investigation. However, studies of the personal epistemology of leaders may provide insights into their behaviours and beliefs associated with transformational and transactional leadership.

Practical implications

Research indicates that personal epistemology can be affected through appropriate interventions. Thus, training programmes designed to facilitate adoption of transformation leadership behaviours could be informed by such research.

Originality/value

This paper is original in its conceptualisations of beliefs potentially underpinning transformational leadership. It offers a new line of inquiry for further research into transformational leadership behaviours and ways that such behaviours can be influenced through metacognitive and cognitive interventions.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Maren Sulimma

Epistemological beliefs, defined as individuals' beliefs about the nature of knowledge and the process of knowing, are assumed to serve an important function in regulating…

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Abstract

Purpose

Epistemological beliefs, defined as individuals' beliefs about the nature of knowledge and the process of knowing, are assumed to serve an important function in regulating the application of individuals' learning behaviour. Previous research has mainly been shaped by the framework of results of white, well‐educated people from North America. More empirical work is needed to examine epistemological beliefs in a cross‐cultural context. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibility of using cultural classifications to indicate the development of epistemological beliefs in different countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐cultural pilot‐study is carried out in Germany and Australia with a total of 103 participants. A German and English version of the Schraw et al.'s epistemic beliefs inventory, based on Schommer's model, is employed for the study. The cultural comparison between Germany and Australia is carried out by using Hofstede and Hofstede's cultural classification.

Findings

The cultural comparison between both countries leads to the hypothesis that the development of the epistemological beliefs is different. Although factor analysis indicates the same three dimensions of epistemological beliefs for both countries (structure, source, and control), the development for each dimension is different.

Practical implications

It might be possible to indicate epistemological beliefs in various countries due to cultural classification.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new perspective of epistemological beliefs within cross‐cultural research and might lay the path for cross‐field research projects.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2017

Kieron Sheehy

The origin of this chapter lies in a presentation by a colleague whose work I admire. Drawing on their extensive experience, they have developed guidance for schools to…

Abstract

The origin of this chapter lies in a presentation by a colleague whose work I admire. Drawing on their extensive experience, they have developed guidance for schools to support children with special educational needs. Their conclusion was that teachers could adopt an eclectic approach, utilizing and combining different interventions as appropriate. The notion of utilizing different teaching approaches to facilitate inclusive education seemed accepted as unproblematic. However, I began to wonder about what happens when teaching approaches are based on conflicting views about the nature of how children learn. This led me to consider a more fundamental question. Do teachers’ own beliefs about how knowledge is created and how children develop (their personal epistemological beliefs) have an impact on their practice and children’s experiences in inclusive classrooms? Answering this question leads to the ethical issue of whether all ways of thinking about how children learn are compatible with teaching in inclusive schools, and the consequences that arise in seeking an answer.

Details

Ethics, Equity, and Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-153-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Frankie J. Weinberg

– The purpose of this paper is to present a knowledge-sharing model that explains individual members’ motivation to share knowledge (knowledge donation and knowledge collection).

1987

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a knowledge-sharing model that explains individual members’ motivation to share knowledge (knowledge donation and knowledge collection).

Design/methodology/approach

The model is based on social-constructivist theories of epistemological beliefs, learning and distributed cognition, and is organized via the mechanism of propositional control, which suggests that attitudes or beliefs largely drive one’s behaviors. This paper also explores how epistemological belief systems may influence behavior processes at work.

Findings

The model presented consists of five epistemological belief dimensions consistent with previous theorization about personal epistemologies. This paper demonstrates how sophisticated (as opposed to naive) beliefs on each of these five dimensions can stimulate one’s intrinsic desire to engage in knowledge-sharing behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

The model is constrained by the assumptions that learning takes place socially and within a specific context (in this case, the team setting), and that a great deal of knowledge sharing is preferred over little knowledge sharing. This paper adds to the understanding of workplace learning by establishing a possible new antecedent to explain the process of how team members are motivated to engage in knowledge-sharing behaviors.

Practical implications

The model may be used for knowledge management and to understand ineffectiveness in teams. It also may assist in human resource functions including selecting and training team members for knowledge-intensive positions.

Social implications

Epistemology affects collaborative relationships. Collaborations and associated knowledge-sharing behaviors among work team members who design and implement products for public use are imperative toward developing products free from health and safety issues.

Originality/value

This paper provides a model for understanding and developing motivation to engage in individual knowledge-sharing behaviors among work team members, which is considered critical toward an organization’s competitive advantage.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Frankie J. Weinberg, Jay P. Mulki and Melenie J. Lankau

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of mentor beliefs about effort related to the knowledge and learning process on their extent of mentoring at work, and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of mentor beliefs about effort related to the knowledge and learning process on their extent of mentoring at work, and to determine the role that the mentor’s perception of psychological safety plays in tempering this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted at an 820-member organization maintenance and operations organization consisting of a number of professions in which apprenticeship-style learning is prevalent. Data collection resulted in 570 members self-identifying as having mentored a less experienced colleague. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm that the measurement instrument represents one unified factor, and a structural equation modelling approach was used to assess the relationships among the study’s latent variables.

Findings

Results reveal that mentors who hold sophisticated effort-oriented beliefs are more likely to offer psychosocial support to their protégés. Further, although the relationship between effort-oriented beliefs and vocational support is not significant, the mentor’s perception of a psychologically safe work environment significantly moderates both sets of relationships.

Research limitations/implications

As approximately 88 per cent of respondents work in service, as opposed to administrative groups, caution should be exercised in generalizing this study’s findings to the general workforce population. Further, the present study did not differentiate mentors who identified a current or previous subordinate as their protégé from those whose protégés were not a subordinate, nor did the authors differentiate formal from informal mentoring relationships. Thus, further investigation is needed to determine whether our hypothesized relationships differ in any unique manifestations of mentoring relationships at work.

Practical implications

By providing a better understanding of the relationship between effort-oriented beliefs and mentoring at work, this study may help in the design of more effective mentoring relationships and ultimately enhance knowledge management and workplace learning.

Originality/value

There is no previous research that investigates how one’s cognitions about the effort associated with the knowledge and learning process, in particular, influence mentoring at work. This study provides a model for understanding and developing enhanced mentoring relationships, which are considered a critical element of organizational learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Jungsoon Choi

This study aimed to explore pre-service teachers’ epistemological beliefs about economics, and their reported future teaching styles for economics using survey and…

Abstract

This study aimed to explore pre-service teachers’ epistemological beliefs about economics, and their reported future teaching styles for economics using survey and interviewing methodologies. This study revealed that the pre-service teachers considered economics to be practical as well as academic. The academic aspect of economics was mutually related to traditional routine ways of teaching. The practical aspect of economics was connected to constructive ways of teaching. Pre-service teachers displayed different thoughts about the effectiveness of teaching for students; routine ways of teaching are effective for low learning ability students, while constructive ways of teaching are effective for high learning ability students. After reporting results, I make suggestions for improving teacher training in economics.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Daisy E. Arredondo and Terrance T. Rucinski

Presents the results of Phase II of a study examining use of integrated curriculum as a reform strategy in US schools. The purposes of this phase were to determine how the…

1623

Abstract

Presents the results of Phase II of a study examining use of integrated curriculum as a reform strategy in US schools. The purposes of this phase were to determine how the uses of integrated curricula change over time and to explore relationships between teacher implementation of integrated curricula and principal beliefs and practices. Telephone interviews with a subset of principals of schools using integrated curriculum gathered information about changes in use since the original data collection, team planning practices, involvement with peer coaching, teacher involvement with decision processes, and relationships among principal belief systems, practices, and support of integrated curriculum. Results, using qualitative and quantitative methods, show that over time integrated curricula use increased and became more sophisticated, time is an obstacle even with common planning periods, teacher involvement in decision processes increased, and principals overwhelmingly believe that the integrated curriculum has positive effects on teachers and students.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Sungae Yoo, Hye Jeong Kim and So Young Kwon

The purpose of this study is to examine similar and/or different perspectives on, and practices of online-learning interaction as projected by the participating educators…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine similar and/or different perspectives on, and practices of online-learning interaction as projected by the participating educators who are from either Korea or the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors analyzed how college instructors from two countries, Korea and the USA, consider the role of online-learning interaction in their students' learning by interviewing nine instructors from both countries. The authors examined the educators' responses using constructivism and Confucianism as the frame of reference.

Findings

The analysis showed that the US instructors tend to focus on learner-to-learner interaction, whereas Korean instructors emphasized teacher-to-learner interaction. Korean instructors perceived a gap between ideal and reality in integrating interaction as a part of online activities in the course.

Originality/value

This study focuses on a cross-national comparison of online-learning interaction between Korea and the USA. Thus, it will provide practical ideas for global or multicultural user experiences on online-learning courses.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Pak K. Auyeung, Ron Dagwell, Chew Ng and John Sands

This study is an exploratory examination of cultural differences in accounting educators’ epistemological beliefs of accounting ethics education. It is motivated by a…

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Abstract

This study is an exploratory examination of cultural differences in accounting educators’ epistemological beliefs of accounting ethics education. It is motivated by a renewed global interest in accounting ethics in recent years following the reported breaches of ethical conducts by individuals from different cultures. In Pratt’s model, conceptions of teaching should be an interdependent and internally consistent trilogy of beliefs, intentions and actions. The purpose of this empirical study is to sketch an outline of how accounting ethics education is broadly understood by accounting educators from three different cultural backgrounds, the Anglo‐influenced Australian, the Chinese and the Moslem‐dominated Malaysian. It explores the cross‐cultural variations in their epistemological beliefs of what to teach, objectives to achieve, the ethics educator, and the learning process. Results suggest that Australian and Malaysian accounting educators differed significantly in their epistemological beliefs on the source of knowledge as well as the acquisition of knowledge. Interestingly, there were no significant statistical differences in the epistemological beliefs held by participants in this study concerning other issues in accounting ethics education, i.e. the delivery of ethics education, transferability, goals of ethics education, separate course, and qualification.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

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