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Article

Agu Godswill Agu, Okwuagwu Okuu Kalu, Chidadi Obinna Esi-Ubani and Paul Chinedu Agu

The purpose of this study is to integrate and extend two models of entrepreneurial intention to investigate the drivers of sustainable entrepreneurial intention among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to integrate and extend two models of entrepreneurial intention to investigate the drivers of sustainable entrepreneurial intention among intermediate undergraduate university students in Nigeria. Specifically, this paper aims to introduce education for sustainable entrepreneurship into the integrated model, thereby fitting the model into the context of sustainable entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered with the help of a structured questionnaire from 435 students of a university in Nigeria. The students passed through a special entrepreneurship training in which they were educated on the concept and practice of sustainable entrepreneurship. SmartPLS was used to test the proposed structural model.

Findings

The findings revealed that education for sustainable entrepreneurship significantly influences all variables of the integrated model, but has nonsignificant direct influence on sustainable entrepreneurial intention. Sustainable entrepreneurial intention is significantly driven by attitude and propensity to act. Therefore, the inclusion of education for sustainable entrepreneurship into the regression equation adds to its explanatory power.

Originality/value

This study contributes toward understanding of sustainable entrepreneurial intention of intermediate university students in a developing world context – Nigeria. Above all, it is among the few studies that shed light on the strength of education for sustainable entrepreneurship in the formation of sustainable entrepreneurial intention among students. This study proposes integration and extension (by adding education for sustainable entrepreneurship) of the theory of planned behavior and entrepreneurial event model in learning about students’ intentions to engage in sustainable entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have been trying to identify different psychological attributes which influence entrepreneurial intention (EI) and role of entrepreneurial education and training programs to develop these attributes among women. Therefore, the purpose of this study is twofold: firstly, to evaluate the difference among psychological attributes before and after an entrepreneurial education and training program. Secondly, to examine the effects of psychological attributes on EI among female students in Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed program was designed with the combination of entrepreneurial education and training program throughout a 14-week semester. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire from 310 female university students studying in a Saudi university and participated in this program. SPSS, version 20, was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Entrepreneurial education and training programs based on active learning and learner-centered approaches play an important role to significantly improve the level of psychological attributes and EI of female students. Furthermore, findings of this study also suggest that psychological attributes (training retention, self-confidence, tolerance of ambiguity, innovativeness and achievement motivation) positively influence EI.

Originality/value

Previous studies only focused on relationship testing among psychological attributes and EI. This research proposes strategies to design entrepreneurial education and training program to improve psychological attributes and EI which can be considered practical version of EntreComp conceptual model.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Giang Hoang, Thuy Thu Thi Le, Anh Kim Thi Tran and Tuan Du

This study aims to explore the mediating roles of self-efficacy and learning orientation in the relationship between entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the mediating roles of self-efficacy and learning orientation in the relationship between entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial intentions of university students in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from an online survey of 1,021 university students in Vietnam. The authors conducted a hierarchical regression analysis to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results of hierarchical regression analysis reveal that entrepreneurship education positively affects entrepreneurial intentions, and this relationship is mediated by both learning orientation and self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

This study confirms the importance of entrepreneurship education in encouraging university students' entrepreneurial intentions.

Practical implications

This study offers practical implications for universities and policy makers.

Social implications

This study is one of the first to empirically examine the concept of entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial intentions in an Asia-Pacific context.

Originality/value

This study emphasises the significance of entrepreneurship education and its effects on university students' entrepreneurial intentions. Furthermore, the findings confirm that self-efficacy and learning orientation play an important part in explaining how entrepreneurship education relates to entrepreneurial intentions.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part

Tariq Ahmed, Ijaz Ur Rehman and Bruno S. Sergi

Understanding and predicting the emergence of venture initiation entails research to explore the antecedents of entrepreneurial intention (EI) and behavior. This book…

Abstract

Understanding and predicting the emergence of venture initiation entails research to explore the antecedents of entrepreneurial intention (EI) and behavior. This book chapter aims to provide an overview on the role of exogenous factors (entrepreneurship education), contextual and environmental factors (perceived entrepreneurial motivators and barriers) in developing EIs and behavior among the university graduates. It also highlights the different strands of opinion and research on the role that formal entrepreneurship programs may (or may not) play in developing EI and action. This book chapter further provides some developments on the factors mentioned above among the different Asian countries while using Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM). Since 1999 GEM reports have been a key source of comparable data across a large variety of countries on attitudes toward entrepreneurship, start-up, established business activities, and aspirations of entrepreneurs for their businesses.

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Book part

Zhaocheng (Elly) Zeng and Benson Honig

Entrepreneurship education has been largely treated as a pedagogical “black box.” Despite the emergence of popular entrepreneurship models such as business planning, the…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship education has been largely treated as a pedagogical “black box.” Despite the emergence of popular entrepreneurship models such as business planning, the lean startup, or business model canvas, neither theoretical nor pedagogical foundations are typically evident. This limits the accumulation of useful evidence that could inform better teaching practices. In this chapter, we develop a set of conceptual models anchored in learning theory regarding how entrepreneurship education should be taught to students. These conceptual models are built on the techniques of entrepreneurship pedagogy such as experiential education. They are developed for three groups of students: students without any entrepreneurship experience, students with previous entrepreneurship experience, and students who are currently running their start-ups. A set of potential variables that could be used for course evaluation purposes is also included. The proposed models meet the needs of students with different levels of entrepreneurship experience. Theoretically, we demonstrate that entrepreneurship students should not be treated as a homogeneous group, as they have different levels of startup experience and different educational needs. Lecturers of entrepreneurship programs could choose the suitable model proposed in this chapter in teaching based on the characteristics of their students. The chapter provides novel insights with regard to how entrepreneurship programs should be designed for students with different levels of entrepreneurship experience.

Details

Models of Start-up Thinking and Action: Theoretical, Empirical and Pedagogical Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-485-3

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Book part

Sergei N. Polbitsyn, Aleksei K. Kliuev, Anna P. Bagirova, Aleksandr A. Iashin and Alexandros Kakouris

Entrepreneurship is a new field of research in Russian higher education. This chapter discusses the emergence of entrepreneurial education in Russian universities by

Abstract

Entrepreneurship is a new field of research in Russian higher education. This chapter discusses the emergence of entrepreneurial education in Russian universities by examining their key documents and relevant curricula. Findings indicate that only a few modern Russian universities develop entrepreneurial programmes that contribute to the income of the less funded from research organisations. These programmes are mainly student-paid graduate programmes aimed at providing students with hard skills. The study also addresses factors that influence students’ entrepreneurial intention following the theory of planned behaviour. Beyond attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control, a new contextual variable of entrepreneurial environment and education significantly impacts intention. This result along with subjective norm influence implies that prospective graduate entrepreneurs in Russia are motivated to venture to contribute to their society. Finally, this study provides recommendations on how Russian universities could empower entrepreneurial education to undertake a substantial role in regional entrepreneurial ecosystem development.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

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Book part

Allan Villegas-Mateos, Elda Barron and Linda Elizabeth Ruiz

The entrepreneurial education has obtained special attention by researchers hoping to develop better entrepreneurship programmes that may result in higher entrepreneurial

Abstract

The entrepreneurial education has obtained special attention by researchers hoping to develop better entrepreneurship programmes that may result in higher entrepreneurial activity outputs of students. The culture on its own is one of the main determinants, among others, of the entrepreneurial activities undertaken in different countries. In that sense, this research contributes to a greater understanding of the relationship between culture and entrepreneurial education. Using one of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s surveys, the National Experts’ Survey, the authors used Structural Equation Models to analyse the sample of N =  445 experts in Mexico as an effort to achieve a consensus about which of these two constructs is dependent on the other, ‘entrepreneurial education’ or ‘cultural and social norms’. The results of this chapter show that in Mexico there is an influence of the cultural and social norms on entrepreneurial education at all levels, primary, secondary, and superior. Nevertheless, an important limitation of the study was that it does not differentiate between private and public education, but yet it contributes to the understanding of the less visible entrepreneurial educational levels in the literature. This chapter aims with the phenomena of how teaching entrepreneurship works by analysing the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s social environment variable effect on entrepreneurial education. This research contributes to the evidence that the teaching practice under the socio-cultural dimension enables to detect the continuity factors to make an educational transformation.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

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Article

Neil Towers, Adhi Setyo Santoso, Nadine Sulkowski and John Jameson

The aim of this paper is to conceptualise entrepreneurial capacity-building as an integrated approach within the international higher education sector. Whilst…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to conceptualise entrepreneurial capacity-building as an integrated approach within the international higher education sector. Whilst university–enterprise collaboration is recognised as being essential to promoting graduate employability and entrepreneurship, the lack of an integrated approach towards embedding entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial capacity-building with an entrepreneurial skill and mind-set prevails in the higher education sector. With reference to the retail sector, increasingly competitive job markets and the need for entrepreneurial capacity-building place growing pressures on universities to nurture career-ready graduates with entrepreneurial acumen.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical paper presents a rationale for embedding entrepreneurship education into university curricula and for promoting university–business collaboration. Secondly, it reviews the extent to which entrepreneurial capacity-building is institutionally embedded to foster graduate entrepreneurship, university–business collaboration and business incubation within one strategic framework. Finally, the paper proposes five propositions within a tripartite approach that can foster graduate entrepreneurs with entrepreneurial skills and mind-set, useful for existing enterprises and start-ups. The implications for these propositions are discussed.

Findings

The authors propose five propositions with a tripartite approach that can foster graduate entrepreneurs with entrepreneurial skill and mind-set, skills for creating enterprises and university–enterprise collaboration within one strategic framework.

Practical implications

Increasingly competitive job markets and the need for entrepreneurial capacity-building place growing pressures on universities to nurture career-ready graduates with entrepreneurial acumen in social science (e.g. retail, business management and accountancy) and science (e.g. pharmacy, architecture and engineering) programmes centred within the tripartite approach.

Originality/value

Whilst university–enterprise collaboration is recognised as being essential to promoting graduate employability and entrepreneurship, the tripartite integrated approach embeds entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial capacity-building with an entrepreneurial skillset and mind-set in the international higher education sector.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Aamir Hassan, Imran Saleem, Imran Anwar and Syed Abid Hussain

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial self-efficacy on the entrepreneurial intention of Indian university…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial self-efficacy on the entrepreneurial intention of Indian university students. This paper also examines the moderating role of entrepreneurship education and gender on the opportunity recognition–intention and self-efficacy–intention relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through a comprehensive questionnaire from 334 students having business and management background. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to ensure the reliability and validity of all the constructs, and structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

This study unveils three important findings. First, opportunity recognition and self-efficacy both show a significant positive impact on the entrepreneurial intention of students. Second, education positively moderates “self-efficacy–intention relationship”, and third, gender negatively moderates “opportunity recognition–intention” and “self-efficacy–intention” relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This study has been carried out using a sample of students from only one university, and the study included only business and management background students. Similar studies can be conducted by adding more motivational and contextual factors with an increased sample size of students having different educational backgrounds.

Practical implications

This study provides pragmatic support to formulate new educational initiatives that can support students in their present or future entrepreneurial projects.

Originality/value

This study adds to the scarce literature on opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial intention and also highlights the moderating role of entrepreneurship education and gender on opportunity recognition–intention and entrepreneurial self-efficacy–intention relationships.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article

Martin Lackéus

Three different pedagogical approaches grounded in three different definitional foundations of entrepreneurship have been compared in relation to their effects on…

Abstract

Purpose

Three different pedagogical approaches grounded in three different definitional foundations of entrepreneurship have been compared in relation to their effects on students. They are: (1) “Idea and Artefact-Creation Pedagogy” (IACP), grounded in opportunity identification and creation, (2) “Value-Creation Pedagogy” (VaCP), grounded in value creation and (3) “Venture-Creation Pedagogy” (VeCP), grounded in organisation creation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected at 35 different sites where education was deemed to be entrepreneurial and experiential. A quantitative, smartphone app-based data collection method was used alongside a qualitative interview approach. 10,953 short-survey responses were received from 1,048 participants. Responses were used to inform respondent selection and discussion topics, in 291 student and teacher interviews. Comparative analysis was then conducted.

Findings

The three approaches resulted in very different outcomes, both in magnitude and in kind. VaCP had strong effects on entrepreneurial competencies, on student motivation and on knowledge and skills acquisition. VeCP had weaker effects on knowledge and skills acquisition. IACP had weak effects on all outcomes probed for. Differences were attributed to variation in prevalence of certain emotional learning events and to variation in purpose as perceived by students.

Research limitations/implications

VaCP could serve as an escape from the potential dilemma faced by many teachers in entrepreneurial education, of being caught between two limiting courses of action; a marginal VeCP approach and a fuzzy IACP one. This could prompt policymakers to reconsider established policies. However, further research in other contexts is needed, to corroborate the extent of differences between these three approaches.

Originality/value

Most impact studies in experiential entrepreneurial education focus only on organisation-creation-based education. This study contributes by investigating entrepreneurial education that is also grounded in two other definitional foundations. Allowance has been made for novel comparative conclusions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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