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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Wendelin Kupers

Based on showing the significance of embodied and relational learning, this paper aims for contributing to a more comprehensive and integral approach to learning in and of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Based on showing the significance of embodied and relational learning, this paper aims for contributing to a more comprehensive and integral approach to learning in and of organizations and its underlying dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodologically, advanced phenomenology and an integral framework are used for generating a more comprehensive analysis and relational understanding of learning in organizations.

Findings

Learning in and by organizations is an ongoing embodied, responsive and relational practice. As such it is covering internal and external as well as individual and collective dimensions entangled within an interdependent nexus and developmental context and integral cycle. Based on these findings perspectives on an “inter‐learning” are presented.

Research limitations/implications

Some theoretical and methodological implications are discussed as well as avenues for future research outlined.

Practical implications

Some practical implications and specific measurements for different domains of learning are outlined briefly.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a needed non‐reductionist, integral and relational understanding of learning in and by organizations. Following a process‐oriented turn, the article provides innovative perspectives on embodied learning as an inter‐relational process, including interior and exterior as well as individual and collective dimensions within an intertwined nexus.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Wendelin Küpers and Desmond Wee

Walking is considered as a particular relationship for rhythmic moving in cityscapes and as method for understanding. The purpose of this paper is to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

Walking is considered as a particular relationship for rhythmic moving in cityscapes and as method for understanding. The purpose of this paper is to explore the significance of an embodied way of sensing and making sense, of knowing and learning that is relevant for tourism education and studies and other forms of experiential learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a conceptual, discursive and research-based approach based on a phenomenological understanding of embodied learning. Empirical “data” from two educational tours (Edutour) in Lisbon and Shanghai are presented, contextualized and interpreted.

Findings

Walking through cityscape related to projects is an “effective” embodied practice of learning in which senses “make sense.” The empirical material and experiences that emerged during Edutour demonstrated the significance of walking as form of embodied knowing, learning and interrelating to place and paces of a tourist city.

Originality/value

The idea of walking as method within tourist cities is hardly explored. Hence, this constitutes a unique, innovative and interpretative event in which new approaches, such as “fielding” and “reflactions” “in the feeld”, defy more traditional concepts. It emphasizes the role of the city as a medium and remains a valuable contribution for tourism and education research.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2019

Bria Davis, Xintian Tu, Chris Georgen, Joshua A. Danish and Noel Enyedy

This paper aims to build on work that has demonstrated the value of play or game-based learning environments and to further unpack how different kinds of play activities…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to build on work that has demonstrated the value of play or game-based learning environments and to further unpack how different kinds of play activities can support learning of academic concepts. To do so, this paper explores how students learn complex science concepts through collective embodied play by comparing two forms of play labeled as Inquiry Play and Game Play.

Design/methodology/approach

This study builds off of previous research that uses the Science Through Technology Enhanced Play (STEP) technology platform (Authors et al., 2015). STEP is a mixed reality platform that allows learners to playfully explore science phenomena, such as the rules of particle behavior in solid, liquid and gas, through collective embodied activity. A combination of interaction analysis and qualitative coding of teacher and student interactions are used to examine patterns in the learning processes during embodied play activities.

Findings

Both forms of play led to similar learning gains. However, Inquiry Play promoted more emergent, flexible modeling of underlying mechanisms while Game Play oriented students more towards “winning”.

Originality/value

By contrasting play environments, this paper provides new insights into how different features of play activities, as well as how teachers orient their students according to these different features, support students’ learning in collective activity. As a result, these findings can provide insights into the design of future play-based learning environments that are intended to support the learning of academic concepts.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Xintian Tu, Chris Georgen, Joshua A. Danish and Noel Enyedy

This paper aims to show how collective embodiment with physical objects (i.e. props) support young children’s learning through the construction of liminal blends that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how collective embodiment with physical objects (i.e. props) support young children’s learning through the construction of liminal blends that merge physical, virtual and conceptual resources in a mixed-reality (MR) environment..

Design/methodology/approach

Building on Science through Technology Enhanced Play (STEP), we apply the Learning in Embodied Activity Framework to further explore how liminal blends can help us understand learning within MR environments. Twenty-two students from a mixed first- and second-grade classroom participated in a seven-part activity sequence in the STEP environment. The authors applied interaction analysis to analyze how student’s actions performed with the physical objects helped them to construct liminal blends that allowed key concepts to be made visible and shared for collective sensemaking.

Findings

The authors found that conceptually productive liminal blends occurred when students constructed connections between the resources in the MR environment and coordinated their embodiment with props to represent new understandings.

Originality/value

This study concludes with the implications for how the design of MR environment and teachers’ facilitation in MR environment supports students in constructing liminal blends and their understanding of complex science phenomena.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

Sonia Goltz and Patty Sotirin

The authors suggest that the research-to-practice gap, such as that found in evidence-based management, is due in part to a lack of attention to embodied knowledge. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors suggest that the research-to-practice gap, such as that found in evidence-based management, is due in part to a lack of attention to embodied knowledge. The recommendation is for change agents to bring attention to embodied knowing when implementing change based on research. The purpose of the paper is to address the research-to-practice gap.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that considers limitations of the predominant approach to considering the research-to-practice gap. The literature on phenomenology, feminist theory, and learning theory form the basis for exploring these challenges as well as possible solutions for transcending the research-to-practice gap.

Findings

Strategic opportunities for introducing increased corporeal understanding are advanced. The suggestions address the research-to-practice gap at three critical stages of research-based change initiatives. These include making embodied knowledge integral to change initiatives in framing research, reducing resistance, and increasing acceptance. Among the specific strategies discussed are attending to tacit knowledge when considering the change, embracing the embrained body including attending to kinesthetic resistance and starting with the body to increase acceptance when implementing change.

Originality/value

There has been very little previous attention to the corporeal in management research and practice, including in the organizational change literature. This paper not only increases this discussion significantly but also provides suggestions for how to move forward in practice.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Andrew M. Cox, Brian Griffin and Jenna Hartel

The purpose of this paper is to reconsider the role of the body in information in serious leisure by reviewing existing work in information behaviour that theorises the…

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2536

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reconsider the role of the body in information in serious leisure by reviewing existing work in information behaviour that theorises the role of the body, and by drawing selectively on literature from beyond information studies to extend our understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

After finding a lack of attention to the body in most influential works on information behaviour, the paper identifies a number of important authors who do offer theorisations. It then explores what can be learnt by examining studies of embodied information in the hobbies of running, music and the liberal arts, published outside the discipline.

Findings

Auto-ethnographic studies influenced by phenomenology show that embodied information is central to the hobby of running, both through the diverse sensory information the runner uses and through the dissemination of information by the body as a sign. Studies of music drawing on the theory of embodied cognition, similarly suggest that it is a key part of amateur music information behaviour. Even when considering the liberal arts hobby, the core activity, reading, has been shown to be in significant ways embodied. The examples reveal how it is not only in more obviously embodied leisure activities such as sports, in which the body must be considered.

Research limitations/implications

Embodied information refers to how the authors receive information from the senses and the way the body is a sign that can be read by others. To fully understand this, more empirical and theoretical work is needed to reconcile insights from practice theory, phenomenology, embodied cognition and sensory studies.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates how and why the body has been neglected in information behaviour research, reviews current work and identifies perspectives from other disciplines that can begin to fill the gap.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Billy Desmond and Angela Jowitt

The purpose of this paper is to bring attention to a more embodied, holistic way of working which acknowledges not only the mind, but also the body and emotions, of…

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1489

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring attention to a more embodied, holistic way of working which acknowledges not only the mind, but also the body and emotions, of learners and facilitators as they work together in a co‐created relationship to experience a different way of learning and relating. The authors suggest that practitioners step away from the traditional boundaries of reflecting on experiential learning activities post action. They propose a stronger emphasis on working in relationship with clients in the here and now, to support novel ways of relating and learning to emerge.

Design/methodology/approach

Adapting a reflective inquiry approach, the authors engaged in reflective and reflexive practice to offer a conceptual paper on a dialogical and embodied orientation to experiential learning.

Findings

Learning within Outdoor Management Development (OMD) activities can be enriched within the context of a dialogical relationship where participants are invited to attend to their embodied experience and trust different ways of knowing. This requires a shift from the more individualist to a relational paradigm of relating and learning.

Research limitations/implications

The authors acknowledge the inter‐subjective nature of learning that emerges from within the relationship. So, while a model is proposed to support meaning making, it is not prescribed and in fact the authors realise that it is paradoxical to the emergent nature of learning within relationships.

Practical implications

The authors seek an alternative approach to Kolb when facilitating experiential learning. They propose the Dialogical Experiential Learning Model, inviting facilitators and participants to be more curious about the experience of working in a specific context, while recognising it will be subject to change.

Originality/value

The dialogical orientation of practitioners and the use of a model does, however, offer guiding principles to support facilitation of experiential learning, while challenging current practitioner knowledge.

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Noraisikin Sabani, Glenn Hardaker, Aishah Sabki and Sallimah Salleh

The purpose of this paper is to explore what is believed to be a deep connection between Islamic pedagogy as a way to cultivate personal learning experiences. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore what is believed to be a deep connection between Islamic pedagogy as a way to cultivate personal learning experiences. The paper discusses the relationship between the characterising features of Islamic pedagogy and personalised learning that remains central to Islamic institutional developments. The paper concludes by highlighting the importance of the embodiment of knowledge in Islamic pedagogy for personalised learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The endeavours to define the characterising features that represents the relationship between Islamic pedagogy and knowledge embodiment.

Findings

The paper proposes that Islamic pedagogy is dependent on both a personalised approach towards teacher and student embodiment. From an Islamic perspective, embodiment has a physical and spiritual dimension where prophecy is retained and is inherent to existence and daily practice. Without the embodied learning the Islamic approach towards pedagogy is seen to disconnect with many students seeking knowledge. This highlights the centrality of the teachers’ relationship with the student and the distinguishing belief of Islamic pedagogy in knowledge embodiment.

Originality/value

The papers contribution to knowledge is in considering personalised learning within the context of Islamic education.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Annemaree Lloyd

Bodies are central to the information experience, but are not often accounted for as a source of information, that is central to the information literacy experience. Based…

Abstract

Bodies are central to the information experience, but are not often accounted for as a source of information, that is central to the information literacy experience. Based on research with emergency services personnel and with nurses, this chapter explores the role of the body as a locus for understanding and meaning-making. Drawing from a sociocultural perspective, the author suggests that the concept of information experience as a stand-alone conception is meaningless. A solution is to acknowledge the referencing of embodied experience against social conditions and ways of knowing that inform peoples’ experience of practice, as located within the body. Key questions for researchers considering an information experience approach are posed.

Details

Information Experience: Approaches to Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-815-0

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Aviel Cogan and Konstantina Martzoukou

The purpose of this study is to investigate how in-service teachers within the context of an American Jewish day school perceive, practice and develop Information Literacy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how in-service teachers within the context of an American Jewish day school perceive, practice and develop Information Literacy (IL) as a sociocultural practice and through Continuing Professional Development (CPD). A research gap exists in relation to empirical studies which examine sociocultural IL practices and the CPD learning experiences of in-service teachers within the professional environment of their work. Two emergent and compatible frameworks for investigating teachers’ IL practices and CPD in context are identified and discussed within that context: the sociocultural approach and the interactive CPD model.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted an interpretivist phenomenological perspective. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with six teachers to explore their IL experiences. Questions addressed the participants’ previous background, the working culture of the school, approaches to learning and developing new knowledge, sources and methods of obtaining work-related information, IL practices and the differences between IL and CPD practices.

Findings

Although teachers value the role of IL in their professional lives and they have confidence in their performance of it, they remain confounded by the IL terminology. Within the teachers’ everyday working environment, the primacy of social and embodied information and the centrality of information sharing demonstrated the social and experiential nature of learning and the significance of contextualisation to IL development. The study found IL, CPD and learning to be inseparable, as they intersected within a single, organic situated learning practice of becoming an expert in context.

Originality/value

This study makes valuable contributions to theory by supplying empirical evidence of sociocultural IL practices, linking the currently disparate scholarships on IL, CPD and learning and providing suggestions for future research. In addition, the study demonstrates alternative avenues for developing teachers’ IL and offers recommendations for supporting their CPD.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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