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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Soumaya Ben Letaifa

This paper uses the multidimensional definition of value – ecosystemic value – and employs lifecycle theory to identify the different stages of evolution of value-creation

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2771

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses the multidimensional definition of value – ecosystemic value – and employs lifecycle theory to identify the different stages of evolution of value-creation and -capture processes in an ecosystem. Specifically, the aim of this paper is to show the uneasy transition from supply chains to ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a field study of a Canadian ICT ecosystem, this paper adopts a multilevel perspective on value-creation and value-capture processes and illustrates how these processes need to move from a dyadic economic focus to a network socioeconomic one.

Findings

The findings pinpoint the uneasy transition from supply-chains management to ecosystems management and provide a framework for understanding how value creation and value capture should be coupled throughout the ecosystem lifecycle. Finally, five theoretical and managerial propositions are suggested to better leverage ecosystemic capabilities and better manage value creation and value capture in ecosystems.

Practical implications

Five theoretical and managerial propositions are suggested to better leverage ecosystemic capabilities and better manage value creation and value capture in ecosystems.

Originality/value

Many marketing and management scholars discuss the limitations of unbalanced perspectives (customer- or seller-centric) in building a comprehensive view of how value is created and captured. This multi-actors case study highlights how ecosystemic value creation may be obstructed by a firm's focus on value capture.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Tiina Tuominen, Bo Edvardsson and Javier Reynoso

This study aims to understand and explain how institutional change occurs at the level of value co-creation practices in service ecosystems. Despite the centrality of…

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1302

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand and explain how institutional change occurs at the level of value co-creation practices in service ecosystems. Despite the centrality of collective practices to the service ecosystems perspective, theoretically grounded explanations of how practices change and become institutionalized remain underdeveloped. Applying the theory of routine dynamics, this paper addresses two questions as follows: what does the institutional change mean at the level of value co-creation practices and what processes underlie these changes?

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops a conceptual framework that characterizes value co-creation practices as routines involving three aspects, namely, ostensive, performative and artifactual. As a key element in institutional change, the interplay between these informs an account of institutional change processes in service ecosystems.

Findings

The proposed conceptual framework specifies the conditions for institutional change in terms of value co-creation routines. First, any such change is seen to be grounded in alignment between changing institutional rules and the ostensive, performative and artifactual aspects of routines. Second, this alignment is seen to emerge through a dialectics of planned and practice-based activities during institutional change. An empirical research agenda is proposed for the analysis of institutional change processes in different service ecosystems.

Originality/value

This conceptual framework extends existing accounts of how service ecosystems change through the contributions of multiple actors at the level of value co-creation practices.

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Carolin Auschra, Timo Braun, Thomas Schmidt and Jörg Sydow

The creation of a new venture is at the heart of entrepreneurship and shares parallels with project-based organizing: embedded in an institutional context, founders have…

Abstract

Purpose

The creation of a new venture is at the heart of entrepreneurship and shares parallels with project-based organizing: embedded in an institutional context, founders have to assemble a team that works on specified tasks within a strict time constraint, while the new venture undergoes various transitions. The purpose of this paper is to explore parallels between both streams of research and an increasing projectification of entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based upon a case study of the Berlin start-up ecosystem including the analysis of interviews (n=52), secondary documents, and field observations.

Findings

The paper reveals that – shaped by their institutional context – patterns of project-like organizing have become pertinent to the new venture creation process. It identifies a set of facets from the entrepreneurial ecosystems – more specifically different types of organizational actors, their occupational backgrounds, and epistemic communities – that enable and constrain the process of new venture creation in a way that is typical for project-based organizing.

Originality/value

This study thus elaborates on how institutional settings enforce what has been called “projectification” in the process of new venture creation and discuss implications for start-up ecosystems.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2012

Andrea Ordanini and A. Parasuraman

Purpose – The paper develops a conceptual framework for assessing value-creating service ecosystems that contains four core dimensions: medium, meaning, usage, and…

Abstract

Purpose – The paper develops a conceptual framework for assessing value-creating service ecosystems that contains four core dimensions: medium, meaning, usage, and network. Its purpose is to identify and discuss the implications of the changes that occur in these dimensions when exchanges within the ecosystem that have long been mediated by physical products become direct instead.

Methodology/approach – The analysis employs the historical method and is based on a systematic investigation of the evolution of the recorded-music market during the past 150 years.

Findings – The analysis shows that the key dimensions of the recorded-music-service ecosystem evolved only gradually and incrementally during the era of physical formats that were dominant until the mid-1990s. With the advent of “liquid” music, the elements of the service ecosystem changed dramatically, leading to instability and redefining roles and exchange mechanisms in the ecosystem.

Research limitations/implications – The investigation focuses on a single ecosystem (music), and conclusions stemming from it are subject to the assumptions inherent in the historical method. Nevertheless, the paper contributes to knowledge in the Service-Dominant Logic (S-D logic) domain by offering a robust framework and a set of core dimensions that are useful for systematically analyzing the nature and consequences of changes that occur in rapidly evolving service ecosystems.

Practical implications – Apart from direct implications for the music market, the proposed framework can help managers working in other ecosystems to adopt a macro perspective in addressing value-creation issues and to pay particular attention to the underlying dynamics that influence value creation in those ecosystems.

Originality/value of paper – The development of a conceptual framework that adopts a macro-level, market-wide perspective for understanding value creation in service ecosystems is a distinct contribution of the paper, as is the application of the historical method in analyzing such an ecosystem.

Details

Special Issue – Toward a Better Understanding of the Role of Value in Markets and Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-913-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Hua Song, Sijie Chen and Kangkang Yu

In industrial and business-to-business (B2B) marketing research, a business network ecosystem is an important antecedent of small- and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs’…

Abstract

Purpose

In industrial and business-to-business (B2B) marketing research, a business network ecosystem is an important antecedent of small- and medium-sized enterprises’ (SMEs’) performance. The purpose of this study is to clarify the direct and indirect effects of ecosystem network health on SMEs’ credit quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The data is collected from a survey of operations managers and financial managers of 282 SMEs in China. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypotheses, and latent moderated structural equations are used to estimate the moderating effect model.

Findings

This research indicates that ecosystem network health can directly affect SMEs’ credit quality and have an indirect impact on credit quality through value co-creation capability. In addition, better informal institutional arrangements in the ecosystem can amplify the positive effects of network health and value co-creation capability on SMEs’ credit quality.

Originality/value

From an ecosystem perspective, it is necessary to bring the ecosystem characteristics into business scenario and explore their impacts on SMEs’ financing behaviors. This study contributes to B2B marketing research in terms of investigating the role played by ecosystem characteristics and value co-creation capability.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Hamish Simmonds and Aaron Gazley

This paper aims to develop impact value (IV), both theoretically and practically, to better account for the processes of value creation within complex service ecosystems.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop impact value (IV), both theoretically and practically, to better account for the processes of value creation within complex service ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper connects the complex systems nature of service ecosystems and the complexity of issues of sustainability and well-being to the need for a conceptual and analytical extension of value within service ecosystems.

Findings

This paper defines IV as enhancement or diminishment of the potential of stakeholders (beyond the service beneficiary), to transfer or transform resources in the future, based on direct and indirect involvement in the processes of value-in-exchange and value-in-use creation.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides an initial exploration of the theoretical and practical extension of value through the IV concept.

Practical implications

Sustainable service ecosystems require actors to understand their role in the service process and account for the impact pathways of their value creation activities. This paper proposes a framework for developing sustainable strategies to account for IV.

Originality/value

This research expands service research’s core concept of value by integrating the complex systems nature of service ecosystems, sustainability and well-being. IV provides a means to address the systemic impact pathways of service and value creation processes and bridge idiosyncratic value-in-use and broader system viability concepts.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Soumaya Ben Letaifa and Javier Reynoso

The purpose of this paper is to combine service-dominant logic premises with ecosystem characteristics in the base of the pyramid (BoP) environment, aiming to establish…

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1904

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to combine service-dominant logic premises with ecosystem characteristics in the base of the pyramid (BoP) environment, aiming to establish the foundations of a new service ecosystem framework for BoP contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is developed by connecting service logic with an ecosystem perspective, developing theoretical propositions for sustainable service ecosystems at the BoP, and identifying future research direction using this new framework.

Findings

The paper first highlights main challenges faced in the BoP environment. It then constructs an ecosystem framework for BoP contexts composed by four theoretical propositions: first, need to shift from a top-down to a multi-actor BoP approach; second, need of social embeddedness for successful BoP initiatives; third, service co-creation for and with local communities with actors playing multiple social roles; and fourth, multi-actor and multi-dimensional value creation. Future research directions are identified related to these propositions.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical propositions integrating the service ecosystem framework need further exploration and confirmation with additional empirical studies.

Practical implications

Proposed framework and propositions provide useful insights for practitioners from different types of organizations aiming to participate in BoP markets.

Social implications

Understanding the need to integrate a service ecosystem perspective in BoP contexts is fundamental to better address the needs of all actors involved.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework proposed offers a comprehensive, multi-dimensional, and multi-actor perspective on how to understand, and better address services in BoP contexts. Future research avenues identified offer a more inclusive agenda for increasing service knowledge at the BoP.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2020

Yeon W. Lee, Hwy-Chang Moon and Wenyan Yin

The main purpose of this research is to construct a generalized set of innovation processes that occur at the ecosystem level based on the academic research. The study…

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1001

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this research is to construct a generalized set of innovation processes that occur at the ecosystem level based on the academic research. The study analyzes the cultural and creativity-driven over-the-top (OTT) platform that encompasses diverse network of ecosystem members by utilizing the four cooperation practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study begins with the literature review that discusses various topics related to ecosystem (e.g. service innovation, innovative ecosystem). Then, this study introduces a new conceptual framework that describes how cooperations occur in the ecosystem. Finally, a qualitative and explorative case study of the OTT platforms in the global context is conducted.

Findings

The application of the framework reveals how co-innovative business ecosystems demonstrate co-evolution through different structures and directions. An ecosystem can evolve by incorporating other industries (i.e. horizontal growth or broadening strategy) to deepen and broaden the industry integration.

Originality/value

As an explorative approach that opens the discussion on how co-innovation and co-evolution occur at the ecosystem level, particularly in the culture and creativity-driven industry, the value of this research extends to other similar industries where diverse actors such as technology firms, Internet firms, direct consumers, government and even the society impact the type of product and service and shape the evolution of the entire ecosystem.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Ming-Chang Huang, Min-Ping Kang and Jui-Kun Chiang

This paper aims to build and empirically test a multilevel framework integrating transaction cost economics and a resource-based view into a value co-creation ecosystem

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to build and empirically test a multilevel framework integrating transaction cost economics and a resource-based view into a value co-creation ecosystem perspective to explain the chain- and firm-level effects of transaction-specific investments (TSIs) on supplier performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates cross-level network effects using survey data from the List of Taiwanese Central Satellite Production Systems. A total of 34 buyers (hub firms) and 106 suppliers (satellite firms) from 34 supply chains responded to the survey.

Findings

Findings confirm that individual firms’ TSIs can foster co-specificity at the supply chain level, thereby improving supply chain integration (SCI). SCI can have a positive cross-level moderating effect on the TSI–performance relationship.

Research limitations/implications

These two key concepts, value co-creation and co-specificity, extend the theoretical application of transaction cost theory and the resource-based view to cross-level study by contributing to the research on the TSI–performance relationship.

Practical implications

This study’s framework is a counter to the buyer–supplier–supplier relationships in which each actor who may have different goals can create value jointly and share benefits from their TSIs.

Social implications

Owing to high co-specificity, being embedded in a well-integrated supply chain can be a threat when the environment is turbulent; for losing strategic flexibility, co-specificity and embeddedness may result in a collective adaptation concern. High degrees of SCI may slow the reaction to environmental turbulence for both buyers and suppliers.

Originality/value

Individual firms’ TSIs can foster co-specificity at the supply chain level, subsequently enhancing SCI. An integrated supply chain can be a collective asset that facilitates value co-creation. Individual firms can benefit from the sharing of collective value. SCI can also increase switching costs, thus reducing the likelihood of individual firm engaging in opportunistic behavior and cost safeguarding.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Pietro Micheli and Gurpreet Muctor

Performance measurement and management (PMM) systems have traditionally enabled strategy execution within and across firms. However, PMM have been criticized as overly…

Abstract

Purpose

Performance measurement and management (PMM) systems have traditionally enabled strategy execution within and across firms. However, PMM have been criticized as overly static and deterministic and therefore inappropriate for emergent and dynamic contexts, such as those that characterize business ecosystems.The study aims to address the roles of organizational PMM practices in the development and implementation of business ecosystem strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out a qualitative, longitudinal study during 2016–2020 at a Japanese multinational technology corporation attempting to create an ecosystem strategy to expand its market and diversify its offering. The authors collected interview, observation and archival data, spanning the period from framing the initial strategy to establishing the ecosystem.

Findings

The process of developing and implementing the ecosystem strategy was emergent and highly iterative, rather than planned and linear, eventually requiring key decision-makers in the company to challenge some of their deeply held assumptions. PMM practices first acted as barriers to ecosystem development by promoting an excessive focus on revenue generation. Once modified, PMM helped capture, convey and reassess the ecosystem strategy. Performance targets, indicators and strategy maps were not just data gathering and reporting mechanisms but key means to express competing perspectives.

Practical implications

When developing an ecosystem strategy, managers should adopt a participatory and iterative approach, reviewing the complementary effects of various PMM tools at different points in time.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to provide an in-depth account of ecosystem strategy creation and implementation and to identify the diverse roles and effects of PMM practices in dynamic and complex contexts.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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