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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Alireza Noruzi

The purpose of this paper is to indicate that when webotherapy is applied, it can be of benefit to clients in giving them insight into their problems, resulting in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to indicate that when webotherapy is applied, it can be of benefit to clients in giving them insight into their problems, resulting in a change of behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Webotherapy, which can be conducted with individuals or groups, refers to the use of web resources or other online reading material (e.g. e‐books, e‐journals) to assist clients (especially children and young adults) in their healing process. It may be defined as the use of web resources to help others gain additional insight and to help them cope with everyday life. Most people have probably read web resources to determine how others have approached a delicate issue.

Findings

This paper suggests that webotherapy is a potentially powerful method for psychologists, librarians, schoolteachers and counselors to use on many levels. It begins with a brief review of the history of webotherapy, continues with a discussion of some approaches to webotherapy (developmental, clinical, and interactive), then addresses the four basic stages of webotherapy (identification, selection, presentation, and follow‐up), and finally discusses the benefits and limitations of webotherapy.

Originality/value

The paper discusses webotherapy and offers a review of literature on related fields.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Nicky Lidbetter and Dawn Bunnell

Self Help Services is a pioneering charity in how it champions personal experience of mental health and uses these experiences in the treatment of people living with…

Abstract

Purpose

Self Help Services is a pioneering charity in how it champions personal experience of mental health and uses these experiences in the treatment of people living with common mental health problems – anxiety, depression, phobias, and low self‐esteem issues. This paper aims to describe how the charity grew from one individual's journey with agoraphobia to being the main provider of primary care mental health services in the North West of England.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper charts the growth of Self Help Services over time, with a particular focus on its employment of people with personal mental health problems. It describes the experiences of its founder and Chief Officer and includes case studies of a user of its e‐therapy services and the charity's Informatics and Governance Lead.

Findings

The case studies illustrate how the charity has grown in both size and success as a result of harnessing the skills and experience of large numbers of staff and volunteers living with a mental health problem. The case studies illustrate that, rather than being an issue, these personal experiences are vital tools in helping others work through their own difficulties.

Originality/value

The paper provides a detailed overview of a charity which was unique when it was formed and now thrives as a result of its uniqueness. It provides other similar organisations with advice on lessons learnt along the way, and advice for individuals or groups looking to establish similar organisations.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Gregg Harry Rawlings, Christopher Gaskell, Keeley Rolling and Nigel Beail

The novel coronavirus and associated restrictions have resulted in mental health services across the UK having to adapt how they deliver psychological assessments and…

Abstract

Purpose

The novel coronavirus and associated restrictions have resulted in mental health services across the UK having to adapt how they deliver psychological assessments and interventions. The purpose of this paper is to explore the accessibility and prospective acceptability of providing telephone and videoconference-mediated psychological interventions in individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a service evaluation, a mixed-methods questionnaire was developed and completed by clients who had been referred for psychological therapy at an adult intellectual disabilities’ community health service in the north of England. All clients were assessed using the Red/Amber/Green (RAG) system by a consultant clinical psychologist for risk and potential suitability for indirect service delivery given their ability and needs.

Findings

Overall, 22 clients were invited to take part, of which, only seven (32%) were accepting of telephone or videoconference-mediated psychological therapy. Most of the clients were unable to engage in video-conference therapy and therefore, only suitable for phone therapy. This paper presents the remaining findings and discusses the clinical implications and unique considerations for intellectual disability services drawing on the existing literature.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that the authors are aware of, examining videoconference-mediated psychological therapy in this population. It is hoped the data will be used to help inform practice or policy when using such therapeutic approaches in adults with an intellectual disability.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Manning Li, Patrick Y.K. Chau and Lin Ge

Inspired by the dynamic changes in our daily lives enabled via quantified-self technologies and the urgent need for more studies on the human-computer interaction design…

Abstract

Purpose

Inspired by the dynamic changes in our daily lives enabled via quantified-self technologies and the urgent need for more studies on the human-computer interaction design mechanisms adopted by these applications, this study explores the value of user affective experience mirroring and examines the empowerment effect of meaningful gamification in a psychological self-help system (PSS) that aids people in work stress relief.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an analysis of the existing systems and theories in relevant fields, we conducted mixed-method research, involving semi-structured interviews, experience sampling experiments and user bio data triangulations, to identify the benefits of user affective experience mirroring and examine the impact of visual impact metaphor–based (VIM) meaningful gamification on PSS users.

Findings

For a gamified PSS, users generally perceive VIM as arousing more feelings of enjoyment, empathy, trust and usefulness, empowering them to gain more mastery and control over their emotional well-beings, especially with relieving their occupational stress and upbringing their level of perceived happiness. Overtime, VIM-based meaningful gamification further boosts such value of a PSS.

Research limitations/implications

Weaving together meaningful gamification and psychological empowerment theories, the results emphasized that successful empowerment of user through gamification in PSSs relies heavily on whether a deeper and meaningful affective connection can be established with the users, in short, “meaningful gamification for psychological empowerment”. Such an understanding, as demonstrated in our research framework, also sheds light on the design theories for persuasive technology and human influence tactics during human computer interactions.

Practical implications

The results of the study demonstrate to practitioners how to make the best use of gamification strategies to deeply relate to and resonate with users. Even without complicated game-play design, meaningful gamification mechanisms, such as VIM facilitate the empowerment of users while gaining their appreciation, establishing a deeper connection with them and eventually generating persuasive effects on intended future behavioural outcomes.

Social implications

The effective management of work-related stress with handy tools such as a VIM-based PSS can be beneficial for many organizations and, to a large extent, the society.

Originality/value

This study proposed and empirically demonstrated the empowerment effect of meaningful gamification for PSS users. In this cross-disciplinary study, theories from different research domains were synthesized to develop a more thorough and multi-faceted understanding of the optimal design strategies for emerging information systems like this VIM-based PSS.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Neil Clark

The development of Gestalt thinking, especially the work of Fritz Perls, is reviewed. It is suggested that the Gestalt process has been marred in the past by placing too…

Abstract

The development of Gestalt thinking, especially the work of Fritz Perls, is reviewed. It is suggested that the Gestalt process has been marred in the past by placing too much power with the therapist. Gestalt can be used more appropriately in Interpersonal Skills Training by giving more real involvement to the learner.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Ivan M. Sharman

Professor H. M. Evans, when making a study of the reproductive capacity of rats at the University of California in 1922, found that animals given a diet containing all the…

Abstract

Professor H. M. Evans, when making a study of the reproductive capacity of rats at the University of California in 1922, found that animals given a diet containing all the then known vitamins failed to produce normal litters. This observation indicated that another vitamin was required for fertility and subsequently led to the recognition of vitamin E. The vitamin was known to be present in lettuce and wheat germ, since when either of these were added to the rats' feed their fertility was restored. Subsequently, in 1936, by a lengthy procedure for concentrating the vitamin, Evans was successful in isolating the pure substance from wheat germ oil. It was identified as an alcohol with the chemical formula G29H50O2 and found to be fat soluble. At the suggestion of Professor G. Calhoun, Evans introduced the name “a‐toco‐pherol” for the pure compound (from the Greek tokos = childbirth, phero = to bear, and “‐ol” indicating that the substance is an alcohol).

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 73 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1972

Ivan M. Sharman

So it was that St Paul, who knew a great deal about athletics, advised his correspondents in Corinth nineteen hundred years ago but the advice might equally well be given…

Abstract

So it was that St Paul, who knew a great deal about athletics, advised his correspondents in Corinth nineteen hundred years ago but the advice might equally well be given to‐day. Every athlete knows the importance of exercising his body in training but may overlook the contribution that an appropriate diet may make to his performance.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Ian Hamilton

Abstract

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Keren Dali, Clarissa Vannier and Lindsay Douglass

Addressed to the audience of LIS educators at all levels, from full-time and adjunct faculty teaching in LIS programs, to librarians and library consultants delivering…

Abstract

Purpose

Addressed to the audience of LIS educators at all levels, from full-time and adjunct faculty teaching in LIS programs, to librarians and library consultants delivering professional development training, to practitioners who work with readers in all types of libraries, this article makes a case for replacing the term “readers' advisory” with the term “Reading Experience (RE) librarianship” as a designator of the current professional practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Using historical and discursive analysis based on the extensive literature review, this article argues that a number of factors call for the change in terminology: changes in the human factor (i.e., changes in readers and reading behavior; and changes in relationships between readers and librarians) and changes in the library environment (the rise of “experience” in libraries; a greater commitment to outreach and community engagement; and the fact that librarians are already practicing RE librarianship without recognizing it as such). It also examines the role of LIS educators in fostering and supporting RE librarianship.

Findings

On the one hand, the new terminology will be more reflective of the work that reader service librarians currently do, thus doing justice to a wide range of activities and expanded roles of librarians; on the other hand, it will serve as an imperative and a motivator to further transform reader services from in-house interactions with and programs for avid readers into a true community engagement, with much broader goals, scope and reach.

Originality/value

The article stands to coin a new professional term for the transformed library practice, thus recording a radical change in longstanding professional activities and encouraging new community-oriented thinking about the expanded role of librarians in promoting reading in diverse social environments.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Alyson Gamble

For decades, artificial intelligence (AI) has been utilized within the field of mental healthcare. This paper aims to examine AI chatbots, specifically as offered through…

Abstract

Purpose

For decades, artificial intelligence (AI) has been utilized within the field of mental healthcare. This paper aims to examine AI chatbots, specifically as offered through mobile applications for mental healthcare (MHapps), with attention to the social implications of these technologies. For example, AI chatbots in MHapps are programmed with therapeutic techniques to assist people with anxiety and depression, but the promise of this technology is tempered by concerns about the apps' efficacy, privacy, safety and security.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing a social informatics perspective, a literature review covering MHapps, with a focus on AI chatbots was conducted from the period of January–April 2019. A borrowed theory approach pairing information science and social work was applied to analyze the literature.

Findings

Rising needs for mental healthcare, combined with expanding technological developments, indicate continued growth of MHapps and chatbots. While an AI chatbot may provide a person with a place to access tools and a forum to discuss issues, as well as a way to track moods and increase mental health literacy, AI is not a replacement for a therapist or other mental health clinician. Ultimately, if AI chatbots and other MHapps are to have a positive impact, they must be regulated, and society must avoid techno-fundamentalism in relation to AI for mental health.

Originality/value

This study adds to a small but growing body of information science research into the role of AI in the support of mental health.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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