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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Malcolm Pattinson, Cate Jerram, Kathryn Parsons, Agata McCormac and Marcus Butavicius

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the behaviour response of computer users when either phishing e‐mails or genuine e‐mails arrive in their inbox. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the behaviour response of computer users when either phishing e‐mails or genuine e‐mails arrive in their inbox. The paper describes how this research was conducted and presents and discusses the findings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was a scenario‐based role‐play experiment that involved the development of a web‐based questionnaire that was only accessible by invited participants when they attended a one‐hour, facilitated session in a computer laboratory.

Findings

The findings indicate that overall, genuine e‐mails were managed better than phishing e‐mails. However, informed participants managed phishing e‐mails better than not‐informed participants. Other findings show how familiarity with computers, cognitive impulsivity and personality traits affect behavioural responses to both types of e‐mail.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not claim to evaluate actual susceptibility to phishing emails. The subjects were University students and therefore the conclusions are not necessarily representative of the general population of e‐mail users.

Practical implications

The outcomes of this research would assist management in their endeavours to improve computer user behaviour and, as a result, help to mitigate risks to their organisational information systems.

Originality/value

The literature review indicates that this paper addresses a genuine gap in the research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Samuel I. Akinseinde and Esharenana E. Adomi

This work surveys use of e‐mail by Technical Education students in Nigerian universities. Questionnaires were used to collect data from technical education students in…

Abstract

This work surveys use of e‐mail by Technical Education students in Nigerian universities. Questionnaires were used to collect data from technical education students in three Nigerian universities: University of Benin, Nnamdi Azikiwe University and Delta State University. Data were analysed and presented by gender using frequency counts and percentages. Findings reveal that a majority of the respondents used e‐mail to communicate with parents/relatives and friends, followed by with course mates, a majority of them have e‐mail address with yahoo, use/access e‐mail in cyber cafés, send and receive less than 10 mails per week, prefer e‐mail to postal system and are deterred by slow computer response from use of e‐mail; conclusion was drawn in the light of findings.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Charles Parker

The use of electronic mail has grown exponentially in the last five years. When used effectively, it is a very effective messaging and information medium. However, abuse…

Abstract

The use of electronic mail has grown exponentially in the last five years. When used effectively, it is a very effective messaging and information medium. However, abuse of e‐mail can be a significant risk to a company: increasingly e‐mail figures in defamation and libel cases, and it is often the company, not just the individual sender of the e‐mail, that is held to be responsible and liable. Establishing and ensuring adherence to a policy on the proper use of e‐mail can minimise such risks – and can yield financial savings. This paper sets out the case for establishing an e‐mail policy and presents sample policies and guidelines for the effective use of e‐mail services.

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Work Study, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Hamid Tavakolian

Do you use Electronic mail (E‐mail)? Do you know if anyone other than the intended recipient is reading the mail you send? And, what would you do if it fell into the wrong…

Abstract

Do you use Electronic mail (E‐mail)? Do you know if anyone other than the intended recipient is reading the mail you send? And, what would you do if it fell into the wrong hands? Employees around the world use E‐mail more than a million times a day (Elmer‐Dewitt, 1993). E‐mail is used for a multitude of purposes including telling jokes, discussing confidential matters, or even spreading gossip that could be potentially offensive if overheard by the wrong person. E‐mail is more convenient for most to use rather than having to pick up the phone or wander down a hall to tell someone something. A common misconception many have concerning the use of E‐mail is that it is as private as mail or a phone call (Elmer‐Dewitt, 1993).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 18 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Liuba Y. Belkin and Terri R. Kurtzberg

This chapter explores how electronic affective displays may influence individual perceptions, behavior and performance by conducting an exploratory analysis using a sample…

Abstract

This chapter explores how electronic affective displays may influence individual perceptions, behavior and performance by conducting an exploratory analysis using a sample of real work emails (study 1), along with a laboratory experiment (study 2). The findings from both studies indicate that positive affective displays may have a stronger impact on individual perceptions (study 1) and invoke greater reciprocity from electronic partners (study 2) than negative affective displays. Moreover, some interesting gender effects with respect to affective displays and individual negotiation performance are observed. The implications for the field, along with limitations of the current research, are discussed.

Details

Individual Sources, Dynamics, and Expressions of Emotion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-889-1

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Book part
Publication date: 29 April 2017

Peter A. Gloor

Abstract

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Sociometrics and Human Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-113-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Kimberly McCarthy, Jone L. Pearce, John Morton and Sarah Lyon

The emerging literature on computer-mediated communication at the study lacks depth in terms of elucidating the consequences of the effects of incivility on employees…

Abstract

Purpose

The emerging literature on computer-mediated communication at the study lacks depth in terms of elucidating the consequences of the effects of incivility on employees. This study aims to compare face-to-face incivility with incivility encountered via e-mail on both task performance and performance evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

In two experimental studies, the authors test whether exposure to incivility via e-mail reduces individual task performance beyond that of face-to-face incivility and weather exposure to that incivility results in lower performance evaluations for third-parties.

Findings

The authors show that being exposed to cyber incivility does decrease performance on a subsequent task. The authors also find that exposure to rudeness, both face-to-face and via e-mail, is contagious and results in lower performance evaluation scores for an uninvolved third party.

Originality/value

This research comprises an empirically grounded study of incivility in the context of e-mail at study, highlights distinctions between it and face-to-face rudeness and reveals the potential risks that cyber incivility poses for employees.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1541-6518

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Coral Ingley, Smita Singh and Alanah Malkani

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to reflect on the value of e-mails for recruiting and interviewing in a specific context in qualitative research, and second…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to reflect on the value of e-mails for recruiting and interviewing in a specific context in qualitative research, and second, to reflect on the benefits of the reflexive practice in sharing the research experience for gaining a deeper understanding of the field. The purpose is to raise points for consideration in research design for the e-mail method in this type of study.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on reflexivity and integrates fieldwork experiences to present the shared reflections and insights into the enabling and constraining aspects of using e-mail interviews with hard-to-access participants such as senior executives of international businesses.

Findings

Closer consideration needs to be given to the use of e-mail interviewing in the research design for such studies, especially regarding culturally held preconceptions about the research environment and how the inevitable challenges in engaging in cross-border research may be resolved.

Originality/value

The paper yields unanticipated insights into the potential of e-mail interviewing for studies that require responses from key informants who are otherwise unlikely to participate in the research. The paper brings greater transparency to researchers regarding the realities of using the method in this context, and thus, it expands the hitherto small repertoire of such studies in qualitative international business research. The contribution also lies in the value of deliberately creating a space for reflexive conversations that open the possibility of more profound understandings in qualitative research.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Aaron David Waller and Gillian Ragsdell

This paper aims to illustrate how a company's current 24‐hour e‐mail culture impacts on employees' lives outside of their contracted working hours. There are two…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate how a company's current 24‐hour e‐mail culture impacts on employees' lives outside of their contracted working hours. There are two objectives of the study – first, to calculate the average time spent on work e‐mails by employees per day outside of working hours and, second, to identify what impact e‐mail had on employees' work‐life balance by addressing three research questions. These questions aims to focus on the relationships between: employees' thoughts about company culture and their belief that their work is dependent on them checking their e‐mails outside of working hours; employees' urges to check e‐mails out of working hours and their belief that spending time on e‐mails outside of work means they are neglecting their social life; and employees sending e‐mails out of office hours and their expectation of a quick reply or action.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was taken. Employees from a multinational service organisation were invited to complete an online questionnaire and a seven‐day diary so as to collect qualitative and quantitative data about their use of e‐mail.

Findings

Data were analysed with respect to respondents' gender, role and length of service in the organisation and discussed with respect to the current literature.

Research limitations/implications

Although the limitations of exploring a single organisation are recognised, it is likely that some of the insights and lessons generated by the study will be transferable to other organisational settings.

Practical implications

This study identified some short‐term recommendations as to how a particular company could limit the negative impact that e‐mails have on its employees' lives outside of contracted working hours. In addition, this study will also raise awareness of the pervasion of work‐related communications into employees' personal lives and, hopefully, trigger further research into the long‐term psychological and sociological effects of a 24/7 communication culture.

Originality/value

There are two novel aspects to this study: the use of diaries as a method of data collection and the notion of exploring e‐mail use “out of hours”.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 64 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Thouraya Gherissi‐Labben, Roland Schegg and Jamie Murphy

This research replicates and extends Frey et al. (2003), using a typical e‐mail query to investigate e‐mail customer service by 260 Tunisian hotels. Based on the hotel…

Abstract

This research replicates and extends Frey et al. (2003), using a typical e‐mail query to investigate e‐mail customer service by 260 Tunisian hotels. Based on the hotel responses, this study found that guests had one chance in ten of receiving a reply within a day and even less chance that hotels answered the inquiry professionally, promptly, politely and personally. Diffusion of innovations failed to explain differences in responsiveness by Tunisian hoteliers but did help explain the quality of e‐mail replies. The results suggest that reply quality differs across hotel size and hotel affiliation. Hotel affiliation as well as hotel category and website presence showed no significant differences in responsiveness. Differences aside, the results highlight that Tunisian hotels can gain an immediate competitive advantage by analysing common e‐mail queries and implementing basic e‐mail procedures.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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