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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Stanley G. Harris and Michael S. Cole

The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of Prochaska and colleagues' “stages of change model,” which has generated substantial support in the therapeutic…

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4655

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of Prochaska and colleagues' “stages of change model,” which has generated substantial support in the therapeutic literature as a useful framework for understanding the dynamics of motivation to change problem behaviors, in a leadership development context.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of over 70 supervisors/managers was studied over a period of nine months as they participated in a company‐sponsored leadership development effort.

Findings

Results provide initial evidence that the stages of change model has the potential for being reliably and validly assessed in a leadership development context. Participants' stage scores related in meaningful ways to relevant criteria such as job attitudes, perceptions of personal leadership areas needing improvement, and evaluations of actual development module content and presentation over a nine‐month period.

Research limitations/implications

Participants were drawn from only one organization and this was the first major leadership development effort undertaken by this organization.

Practical implications

Study results provide support for the appropriateness of applying the stages of change model and its measurement in a leadership development context. Results demonstrate that the stages of change model appears to offer useful and pragmatic insight into motivation to learn and on improving the effectiveness of leadership development activities.

Originality/value

The present study is unique in that makes use of a stages of change model to empirically examine differential patterns of relationships between participants' stages of change and their organizational attitudes, leadership developmental needs, and longitudinal reactions to the development effort.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2017

Mark E. Mendenhall, Todd J. Weber, Audur Arna Arnardottir and Gary R. Oddou

The process of global leadership development remains a challenging theoretical problem in the field of global leadership. To help address this issue, we develop a…

Abstract

The process of global leadership development remains a challenging theoretical problem in the field of global leadership. To help address this issue, we develop a theoretically grounded process model of global leadership competency development that addresses the dynamics involved in the adoption and enhancement of intercultural competencies associated with global leadership. We do this by integrating theoretical constructs associated with competency development from the adult learning and development, cognitive-behavior therapy, global leadership development, leadership development, organizational development, and social learning theory literatures. The resulting model includes testable propositions – a critical feature that existing global leadership development process models currently lack. Our chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications of the model for future research and practice.

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Carrie A. Blair, Charles Allen Gorman, Katherine Helland and Lisa Delise

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between intelligence and behavior during leader development.

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1281

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between intelligence and behavior during leader development.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a leader development program, a variety of measures are collected, including measures of intelligence and measures of performance (e.g. assessment center performance, a 360-degree appraisal). The participants are given performance feedback from a variety of sources then asked to form developmental goals. The goals are examined for goal quality and goal-feedback correspondence, and examined in relation to intelligence.

Findings

Intelligence was positively related to goal-feedback correspondence. Intelligence was also related to goal quality after controlling for variance attributed to professional discipline.

Research limitations/implications

Personality, gender, age, and other variables were not included in this study. Other factors, such as the cultures of the organizations from which the individuals hailed, were also not included. Moreover, the conclusions were based on the behaviors exhibited in one leader development program. Future research should address these limitations.

Practical implications

Leader development is expensive and is becoming more popular. The results of this research could help organizations better determine who is likely to benefit from the investment in leader development.

Originality/value

In addition, a unique method is presented in the study for measuring leader development behavior based on goal quality and goal-feedback correspondence. Generalizability theory is applied in order to determine the reliability of the measures.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Orlando J. Olivares

The primary purpose of this paper is to explore how momentous events may contribute to leadership development. A second purpose is to show how the formative attributes of…

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2022

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this paper is to explore how momentous events may contribute to leadership development. A second purpose is to show how the formative attributes of momentous events are linked to leader traits needed for effective leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The leadership tripod is used as the relational framework for exploring the formative capacity of momentous events. The formative capacity of momentous events, however, is realized through the personal memories of those events, that is, through autobiographical memory. Autobiographical memory, then, will provide an additional more rudimentary framework for exploring momentous events; within this framework, the momentous event will be dissected in order to identify its basic attributes, to explore how these attributes affect the leadership structure, and to show how changes to the leadership structure develop leaders.

Findings

Attributes and formative mechanisms of momentous events were identified, as were leader traits necessary for developmental readiness. Also, six propositions were distilled from this research. These propositions guide the implications about leadership training.

Practical implications

First, this research provides insight for leader‐situation interactions. Second, this research may provide guidance for strategies used in leadership development training.

Originality/value

This research provides three unique contributions to the literature: a focus on the experiential and relational aspects of leadership development; an analysis of the formative attributes and mechanisms of momentous events, along with the leader traits necessary for developmental readiness; and an exploration of momentous events as personal events memories.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2014

Erik M. Hines, Paul C. Harris and Dwayne Ham

In this chapter, the authors discuss how school counselors may create a college-going environment for African American males in middle school. The authors use…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors discuss how school counselors may create a college-going environment for African American males in middle school. The authors use Bronfenbrenner’s (1979) Ecological Systems Theory to explain how environmental influences impact African American males’ college trajectory, both positively and negatively. Moreover, they use Ecological Systems Theory to discuss how multiple stakeholders (e.g., school counselors and parents) and various structured activities that align with the Eight Components of College and Career Readiness (NOSCA, 2010) may promote college preparation among Black male middle school students. The authors also present two case vignettes as examples of how school counselors may assist African American males for postsecondary options. In closing, the chapter concludes with implications for educational policy, research, and practice.

Details

African American Male Students in PreK-12 Schools: Informing Research, Policy, and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-783-2

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Jarle Eid, Bjørn Helge Johnsen, Paul T. Bartone and Odd Arne Nissestad

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of personality hardiness in facilitating change or growth in transformational leadership of Norwegian Navy cadets…

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4422

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of personality hardiness in facilitating change or growth in transformational leadership of Norwegian Navy cadets following a stressful military training exercise.

Design/methodology/approach

Leadership styles were measured in cadets before and after an intensive leadership training exercise, and again six months later. Hardiness was measured near the end of the first academic year. Leader performance was measured with first year leader development grades.

Findings

Repeated measures ANOVAS showed a sustained increase in transformational and transactional leadership following the exercise, and a decrease in the passive‐avoidant style (management by exception – passive and laissez‐faire).

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted with a relatively small group and findings may not generalize readily to other populations.

Practical implications

These results suggest high hardy individuals have a greater readiness to make use of stressful training experiences as opportunities for developmental growth as leaders.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to explore the role of a key personality variable – hardiness – to facilitate positive benefit from a real‐world training experience designed to develop better leadership capabilities. Further, it is one of few studies to identify factors contributing to the growth transformational leadership style. A strength of the study is that it was conducted in the context of a real‐world leadership training activity.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Peter Halliwell, Rebecca Mitchell and Brendan Boyle

The purpose of this paper is to investigate interrelations between enhanced emotional intelligence, leadership self-efficacy and task-oriented leadership behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate interrelations between enhanced emotional intelligence, leadership self-efficacy and task-oriented leadership behaviour following participation in leadership coaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Organisational leaders (coachees) (N = 70) and their subordinates (N = 175) completed online questionnaires pre- and post-coaching. To account for pre-coaching scores, construct latent change scores were assessed using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

Results indicate a positive association between enhanced emotional intelligence and leadership self-efficacy, however, little support was found for leadership self-efficacy as a mediator explaining an association between enhanced emotional intelligence and task-oriented leadership behaviour.

Practical implications

Organisations aiming to improve leader performance through enhancing emotional intelligence and leadership self-efficacy may find value in leadership coaching due to the intervention's positive effect on these constructs, and the positive association observed between developmental changes in these constructs.

Originality/value

Research on the interrelation between emotional intelligence and leadership self-efficacy is scarce. This study extends the literature by investigating the interrelation between developmental changes between these constructs brought about by leadership coaching using latent change scores and PLS-SEM. The study also assesses whether enhanced leadership self-efficacy mediates an association between enhanced emotional intelligence and task-oriented leadership behaviour building on the literature explaining coaching's effect mechanisms.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Elizabeth P. Karam, William L. Gardner, Daniel P. Gullifor, Lori L. Tribble and Mingwei Li

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the…

Abstract

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the past decade. Consideration of the implications of these constructs for high-performance human resource practices (HPHRP) is limited, however. In this monograph, we present a conceptual model that integrates authentic leadership/followership theory with theory and research on HPHRP. Then, we apply this model to systematically consider the implications of skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing HR practices in combination with authentic leadership for authentic followership, follower work engagement, and follower performance. We contend that authentic leadership, through various influences processes, promotes HPHRP, and vice versa, to help foster enhanced work engagement. By cultivating greater work engagement, individuals are motivated to bring their best, most authentic selves to the workplace and are more likely to achieve higher levels of both well-being and performance.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2017

Boy van Droffelaar and Maarten Jacobs

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of leaders’ wilderness experiences on intentions to transform leadership behaviors toward authentic leadership.

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1086

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of leaders’ wilderness experiences on intentions to transform leadership behaviors toward authentic leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis was used on trail reports made by participants of a wilderness-based leadership program. Participants (n=97) were leaders working in business and institutional settings, both males and females. Participants were asked to write personal reports within two weeks after the training program about their wilderness experiences, and related behavioral intentions.

Findings

The analyses revealed four categories of leaders’ peak experiences: heightened sense of self, awareness of one’s core values, deep connected attention, and being in full presence. These peak experiences triggered intentions to change future leadership behaviors: to be more aware of self, to live by the inner compass, to improve careful listening, and to become more transparent. These intentions closely resonate with the core components of authentic leadership.

Research limitations/implications

The authors’ sample is characterized by developmental readiness: people who are already willing to change. However, developmental ready leaders are the subset of leaders that is particularly relevant studying change toward authentic leadership. Another limitation is intentions are assessed, and hence knowledge about actual changes in leadership style requires additional research.

Practical implications

The attributes of the transformation program that foster change as revealed here – being in another world, facing unfamiliar challenges, peer-to-peer learning – can be flexibly adopted and implemented in a wide range of leadership transformation programs.

Originality/value

By demonstrating that being immersed in nature can act as a significant life event that has the potential to foster authentic leadership, this study provides an original contribution to the literature on strategies for intra-personal leadership development.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Heinrich Oosthuizen, Paul De Lange, Trevor Wilmshurst and Nicola Beatson

The purpose of this study is to explore the reasons why international accounting students in higher education in Australia do not accept leadership roles in academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the reasons why international accounting students in higher education in Australia do not accept leadership roles in academic teams, considering the importance employers attach to leadership and teamwork graduate attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the Keating et al. (2014) ready, willing and able (RWA) leadership framework, this qualitative study uses a narrative textual approach to analyse the data from responses to open-ended questions recorded in interviews with a sample of Master of Professional Accounting (MPA) students (N = 12) undertaking leadership-in-team roles in a management and cost Accounting unit (N = 110) within an Australian higher education accounting program.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that a lack of past work experience disadvantages accounting students in being ‘ready’ to adopt leadership roles in teams. Self-interested behaviour results in students not being ‘willing’ to adopt leadership roles. Students perceive business simulation and work-integrated learning activities to hold the potential to improve their ‘ability’ to lead.

Practical implications

The study offers a conceptual schema for student leadership development, suggesting that accounting curricula in higher education should include the assessment of scaffolded leadership development activities. Mentorship roles in academic teams should also be explored.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first application of the RWA framework to explore accounting students’ predisposition to accepting leadership roles in teams. Informed by the student narrative, the authors offer a future focused RWA schema as a practical guide for educators to embed leadership development in the accounting curriculum.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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