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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Kajsa G. Åberg

The paper aims to illuminate the discrepancy between the need for knowledge as found in prior research and the requirements formulated by those taking part in destination

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to illuminate the discrepancy between the need for knowledge as found in prior research and the requirements formulated by those taking part in destination development. The results are intended to contribute to further research on the role of knowledge in destination management when performed as a strategy for regional development.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on theories within epistemology and tourism, an interview structure was developed and used in 10 in-depth interviews, with a qualitative approach through open-ended questions. This was complemented by a mapping of specific background factors through enquiries with 23 respondents. The paper follows an explorative approach to illuminate one aspect within the research area of destination development.

Findings

It was found that when recruiting much significance is put on understanding the structures of involved actors and local rooting. In contrast to theoretical findings, specific knowledge was not a prioritized requirement, neither in tourism nor marketing. Hence, there is a gap between what is perceived as needed for destination development according to academia and how it is being performed by practitioners.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in geography and context. Because the research design was showed to be successful in capturing significant aspects, it is proposed for use in further research.

Practical implications

The paper deepens the understanding of factors explaining success and impediments of destination development. It underlines the need for bridging the gap between theory and practice.

Originality/value

This work addresses a vital, but not fully explored, aspect of an extensively implemented strategy for regional development.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2020

Kurtulus Karamustafa, Pembe Ülker and Harun Çalhan

This study provides insights on the perceptions of residents in destinations offering different tourism products at different levels of tourism development.

Abstract

Purpose

This study provides insights on the perceptions of residents in destinations offering different tourism products at different levels of tourism development.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,122 valid responses were gathered through surveys from the residents of three unique destinations, with different levels of tourism development. Non-parametric tests were performed since the data was gathered on an ordinal scale and not distributed normally.

Findings

The tourism perceptions of the residents formed a five-factor structure, namely “socioecological negative”, “socioeconomic positive”, “socioecological development (wellbeing)”, “negative perceptions of tourism” and “tendency to become visitor”. All dimensions except for “socioeconomic positive” differed significantly by destinations in terms of level of tourism development or type of tourism product offered.

Research limitations/implications

Residents' perceptions of tourism differ based on different tourism products and different levels of tourism development of destinations. The residents of the most mature destinations in terms of tourism development have the most negative perceptions of tourism.

Originality/value

Although there are studies investigating how residents' perceptions differ based on the level of tourism development of destinations, this study, with its holistic approach, aims to provide insights on how residents' perceptions of tourism differ based on the tourism products offered by different destinations. The selected destinations differ from each other in both their level of tourism involvement and products they offer, hence the originality of the current study with its unique contribution to the related body of knowledge.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Harald Pechlaner, Daniel Zacher, Christian Eckert and Lukas Petersik

The purpose of this paper is to discuss responsibility in tourism destinations. On the basis of a resilience approach, central aspects of leadership and of responsibility…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss responsibility in tourism destinations. On the basis of a resilience approach, central aspects of leadership and of responsibility in destination networks are introduced and, a contribution to a conceptual analysis of the future viability of tourism destinations is made. This contributes to a better understanding of resilience from a destination management organization (DMO) perspective in the context of shared responsibility.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this goal, a qualitative interview series was conducted with destination managers in urban and rural areas. The interviews were evaluated using the method of GABEK®, in order to reveal and visualize semantic relationships between the specific statements. This method allows the representation of linkages and relationships of keywords from interview transcripts in the form of network graphs.

Findings

A major result is the existence of a network of leaders who take responsibility for tourism development within a tourism destination. Within this network, the destination manager once again plays a key role by developing and formulating visions, goals and strategies. In this context, the relevant employees of the DMO have an important role to play, since they are an important resource of tourism development due to their experience and competences.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a practical view on the development of visions and strategies. It analyzes challenges and possible ways to communicate with the required political and public actors of the destination as well as with the service providers to regard destination development as a collaborative task.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Harald Pechlaner, Daniel Zacher, Elina Gavriljuk and Christian Eckert

The development of tourism can be considered from a tourist and a local perspective. The tourism space functions both as a tourism destination and a living space for local…

Abstract

The development of tourism can be considered from a tourist and a local perspective. The tourism space functions both as a tourism destination and a living space for local residents. Methods of atmospheric design can contribute to consider the guest’s view which can bring dynamism into the development of places and locations. This is seen as an interesting option for the Bavarian small town of Eichstaett in Germany, whose challenges and opportunities in tourism development are the focus of this contribution. Small towns have the potential to achieve tourism visibility and to increase the quality of life of the local population through a stronger engagement with the atmospheric design of their space.

Details

Atmospheric Turn in Culture and Tourism: Place, Design and Process Impacts on Customer Behaviour, Marketing and Branding
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-070-2

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Metin Kozak, Michael Volgger and Harald Pechlaner

This paper aims to provide an original body of work that presents and discusses the theory that destination leadership is about proactively shaping the future development

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an original body of work that presents and discusses the theory that destination leadership is about proactively shaping the future development of destinations and territories. This is the second part of the special issue of Tourism Review on destination leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial introduces the papers included and highlights a few general thoughts about the interplay between destination leadership and territorial development.

Findings

This introduction summarizes how the papers in this special issue contribute to two streams of research: first, the papers reflect on the necessity of adapting the specific form and style of destination leadership to the development status of a destination. Second, papers highlight that local stakeholders, local knowledge and the local context, in general, have a high impact on destination leadership.

Originality/value

By summarizing and condensing the various contributions to this special issue, the editorial introduction highlights that destination leadership is about proactively shaping the future of tourist destinations. Furthermore, it argues that this development needs to respect local networks, territorial characteristics, histories and contexts. Therefore, tailoring destination leadership to their own territories seems to be an essential success factor, and in the future, we may want to define Alpine destination leadership, island destination leadership, city destination leadership, etc.

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Chung Shing Chan, Mike Peters and Birgit Pikkemaat

The purpose of this paper is to understand the perceptions of visitors in terms of multiple aspects of smart cities to allow wise decisions to be made about smart tourist…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the perceptions of visitors in terms of multiple aspects of smart cities to allow wise decisions to be made about smart tourist destinations by municipal governments and tourism authorities.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a sample of inbound visitors (n=205) from Hong Kong as an empirical questionnaire-based survey on visitors’ perceptions of these smart city attributes, which are collected from literature, and framed in Cohen’s Smart City Wheel.

Findings

This paper identifies the distinctive factors for branding Hong Kong as a smart city. The results from the factor analysis identify four factors for determining what a smart city is from the perspective of visitors, namely, the quality of a smart society: energy consumption in an urban environment, smart city governance and smart city livelihood. The first two factors further become the determinants of a successful smart city brand considered by visitors, which contribute to their locational decisions and thus the strategies and policies of smart destination branding.

Research limitations/implications

The results obtained can serve as insights for tourism policy makers and destination marketers when considering significant information and communication technology, or other smart and sustainable attributes for city branding (e.g. Buhalis and Amaranggana, 2014; Marine-Roig and Anton Clavé, 2015), as well as common investment and resource allocation for shared benefits in similar metropolises.

Practical implications

The smartness factors represent important dimensions of urban smartness as prioritized areas for further development, innovation and marketing of tourism industries and enterprises in Hong Kong, as a mature urban destination incorporating the branding of a proposed smart district as a strategy of urban development.

Originality/value

Smart urban development and tourism development have increasingly become inseparable, especially when visitors utilize cities as tourist destinations but share other urban resources and spaces with local citizens. Unlike the development of smart tourist attractions, smart tourist destinations should have a wider scope of smartness. A smart tourist destination may carry similar and overlapping characteristics of smart cities, which may be interpreted by visitors and may eventually affect their perceived image of a city.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Zahra Nadalipour, Mohammad Hossein Imani Khoshkhoo and Abdolreza Roknoddin Eftekhari

This study aims at developing a framework to investigate and analyze sustainable competitiveness in tourism destinations.

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1634

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at developing a framework to investigate and analyze sustainable competitiveness in tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has a qualitative approach, and it has been conducted by use of a comprehensive literature review. First, the key concepts of the study such as destination competitiveness, sustainable development, stakeholders’ attitude and performance and tourist loyalty were identified. Then, an integrative review was conducted on literature regarding the mentioned keywords. More related resources were selected and critically reviewed to explore gaps. For this purpose, a search was conducted at databases such as Emerald, Elsevier and ScienceDirect.

Findings

An appropriate framework for tourism sustainable development and, in particular, for its sustainable competitiveness, requires considering economic, sociocultural and ecological dimensions on the one hand, and considering all stakeholders participating in tourism process on the other hand.

Research limitations/implications

The model suggested in this study can be applied by managers and policymakers in various destinations to investigate true competitiveness situation of their tourist destinations. It also can be theoretically a start point to raise further issues and studies on destination competitiveness by adopting a new sustainability approach.

Originality/value

From reviewing previous studies, it is clear that most models developed on destination competitiveness only consider creation of competitiveness and destination’s characteristics. In addition, a sustainability approach has rarely been considered in these studies. A model or a framework specially designed for evaluating and investigating sustainability of destination competitiveness has not been developed yet. In this sense, the proposed framework in this study is a new one. What differentiates this model with previous ones is the sustainability approach to the competitiveness and taking all stakeholders of the competition process into account.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Ulrike Pröbstl-Haider, Verena Melzer and Alexandra Jiricka

This paper aims to address lack in destination leadership and to propose a new typology of approaches. Frequently, rural tourism is suggested as a remedy that should…

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1946

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address lack in destination leadership and to propose a new typology of approaches. Frequently, rural tourism is suggested as a remedy that should enhance the local economy, create new jobs, strengthen the regional identity and finance the infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study analysis shows that regions, communities, tourism organizations and managers use different strategies to strengthen their tourism offers or to develop new ones. The paper analyzes different development approaches among destinations and discusses their respective leadership structure.

Findings

The typology of tourism development models makes the different development options transparent and easy to understand. This may aid a community to support tourism development with spatial planning and avoid conflicts with other forms of land uses. Overall, leadership for rural tourism development should lead to a strategic cooperation between tourism businesses and other organizations based on a commitment to destination coherence.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen research approach is based on the analysis of Central European case studies. Therefore, researchers of other geographical backgrounds are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

The presented typology illustrated four distinct options of coherent development strategies, which can support communities/regions to find a long-term decision frame.

Originality/value

The presented typology facilitates collaborative planning, helps operationalize rural tourism development policies and provides the foundation for spatial planning, all of which furthers the linkages between tourism and other sectors in the rural economy.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2017

Luisa Errichiello and Alessandra Marasco

The chapter aims at advancing existing knowledge on innovation-oriented public-private partnerships for developing smart tourism services at destination level. Recent…

Abstract

The chapter aims at advancing existing knowledge on innovation-oriented public-private partnerships for developing smart tourism services at destination level. Recent research has emphasized to the importance of collaborative arrangements involving public sector organizations and private companies for the development of new or improved ICT-enabled tourism services towards the smart transformation of destinations. However, knowledge on public-private partnerships specifically set up for realizing smart innovations is still scarce. This chapter develops a framework for understanding the nature and functioning of this type of partnerships at destination level by integrating literature on tourism partnerships, smart tourism, and innovation in services with a case study of a successful partnership in the Italian destination of Siracusa.

Details

Knowledge Transfer to and within Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-405-7

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Adrian Guachalla

This paper aims to identify the factors that foster an interest in opera and Opera Houses as a specific form of cultural capital and how the Opera House tourist constructs…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the factors that foster an interest in opera and Opera Houses as a specific form of cultural capital and how the Opera House tourist constructs images of destinations from the cognitive, affective and conative dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

A social constructivist methodology was adopted, and data was captured through online qualitative questionnaires from 226 Opera House tourists using a simple random sampling approach. These enquired about the development of their interest in opera and Opera Houses and the influence this exerts on their destination image formation process.

Findings

This form of cultural capital is mainly developed by exposure to art forms through family, social and further reference groups. Opera Houses project cognitive images of cosmopolitanism, affective images of social belonging and conative images of further opportunities to experience culture and leisure fostering destination loyalty and place attachment.

Research limitations

Productions of both opera and ballet are staged at Opera Houses, opening avenues for further research on either the opera or ballet tourist markets specifically using case studies across the ample spectrum of Opera Houses around the world.

Practical implications

In addition to the visual appeal and quality of cultural produce, tourism practitioners can use an Opera House’s projected affective images of social cohesion and togetherness to attract the Opera House tourist market. Opera Houses enrich a destination’s visual and cultural landscapes, cementing the need to preserve and promote their contributions to the destination’s cultural identity.

Social implications

This study highlights the need for cultural policy and audience development strategies that cultivate this type of cultural capital resulting in demand for and supply of cultural products that in turn stimulate the development of this niche cultural tourism market segment.

Originality/value

To the best of author’s knowledge, this is the first study that has approached the Opera House tourist from the destination image formation context.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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