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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Leib Leventhal

The purpose of this paper is to argue that understanding and exceeding customer expectations in the aged care services is more complex than other health services and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that understanding and exceeding customer expectations in the aged care services is more complex than other health services and general services because of the multiple stakeholders and additional intimacies that exist.

Design/method/approach

The author first explores expectation theory and how it links to customer behaviour and then discusses confirmation/disconfirmation theory.

Findings

The author builds an argument that aged care service providers must understand consumer needs and expectations so that customer satisfaction is generated.

Originality/value

Exploring patient and relative expectation and satisfaction in different theoretical contexts.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Jackie L.M. Tam

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effects of brand familiarity on satisfaction evaluations and behavioral intentions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effects of brand familiarity on satisfaction evaluations and behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal survey involving pre‐purchase measures and post‐purchase measures was conducted with consumers in a restaurant setting. The hypotheses were assessed through LISREL methodology.

Findings

The results showed that there are some similarities and differences among customers with different levels of brand familiarity regarding satisfaction formation and behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

A self‐reported item was used to measure brand familiarity. Although there was some evidence to support that the measure captured what it was intended to measure, it would be desirable to develop a multi‐item scale for this construct. There is also a need to extend the findings to other service industries.

Practical implications

Marketers should familiarize customers with a service while capturing opportunities to create a positive experience to gain customers' future purchases.

Originality/value

The study offers some insights into the effects of brand familiarity on satisfaction evaluations and behavioral intentions. It is particularly relevant for marketing services that are high in experience qualities.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Mahesh S. Bhandari, Yelena Tsarenko and Michael Jay Polonsky

The purpose of this paper is to extend thinking on service recovery processes and satisfaction with service recovery, using multi‐dimensional consumer outcomes. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend thinking on service recovery processes and satisfaction with service recovery, using multi‐dimensional consumer outcomes. The objective of the work was to propose that satisfaction with service recovery should be based on customers' expectations of the recovery encounter, which would be shaped by their expectations of “non‐failed” encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a theoretical approach. Using the existing service recovery literature as well as the traditional services literature, the conceptual framework and associated research propositions are developed.

Findings

The proposed framework suggests that service recovery is a service encounter it its own right. The effectiveness of recovery encounters will be based on how encounters operate relative to customer expectations and experiences with regard to the recovery activity.

Research limitations/implications

The research propositions and proposed framework need further empirical investigation.

Practical implications

The proposed framework suggests that managing service recovery should be undertaken in a similar fashion to managing any service, and thus managers need to understand customers' recovery expectations. Organisations also need to consider how a recovery action impacts on a range of customer outcomes, as focusing on one aspect will not capture consumers' full set of behaviours.

Originality/value

The proposed model identifies that service recovery should be evaluated with regard to consumers' recovery expectations and satisfaction is not based on expectations with regard to non‐failed encounters.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2014

Andrea Pérez and Ignacio Rodríguez del Bosque

The purpose of this paper is to examine customer corporate social responsibility (CSR) expectations in the crisis context of the Spanish banking industry. The paper also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine customer corporate social responsibility (CSR) expectations in the crisis context of the Spanish banking industry. The paper also takes into consideration the role that corporate governance structure plays in customer CSR expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysing 648 customers of savings banks and 476 customers of commercial banks, several univariate statistics and two cluster analyses are implemented.

Findings

The authors identify significantly consistent patterns in the CSR expectations of savings banks and commercial banks customers. The customers of both types of banking companies have similar high expectations concerning the CSR oriented to customers, shareholders and supervising boards, employees, the community and legal and ethical CSR. Also customers of both types of banking companies can be consistently classified as customer oriented, legally (customer)-oriented and CSR-oriented customers depending on their CSR expectations.

Practical implications

These results have interesting implications for managers because it allows them to develop optimal CSR based on their customersexpectations. In this regard, it is observed that the CSR expectations of savings banks and commercial banks customers are quite homogeneous in such a way that the traditional differentiation in the CSR implemented by savings banks and commercial banks may be no longer justified.

Originality/value

Previous scholars who have analysed customer CSR expectations have not studied them in a crisis context. This paper contributes to literature by proposing new managerial strategies for companies facing a product or corporate crisis. Scholars studying customer CSR expectations in the banking industry have not considered the role of corporate governance structure either. This paper provides detailed information about the CSR expectations of savings banks customers and commercial banks customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Alison M. Dean

Reported studies on call centers emphasize efficiency and control, with possible implications for service priorities, customer orientation and service quality. However…

Abstract

Reported studies on call centers emphasize efficiency and control, with possible implications for service priorities, customer orientation and service quality. However, there is little empirical research to test assumptions from the customer’s perspective. This study aimed to establish whether customers expected (predicted) low levels of service from a call center, how this level compared to the minimum level they considered adequate, and whether the perceived customer orientation of the call center was related to service quality expectations. Data were collected in Australia from two sources: end consumers (n = 289) of an insurance provider, and business customers (n = 325) of a bank. Key findings were similar for both samples. First, customers had very high levels of adequate (minimum) expectations, and adequate expectations behaved independently from predicted (forecast) expectations. Second, customer orientation was associated with predicted expectations but not adequate expectations. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research and managerial implications.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Ibrahim Giritlioglu, Eleri Jones and Cevdet Avcikurt

The aim of this study was three-fold: first, to develop an instrument to evaluate food and beverage service quality in spa hotels; second, to identify aspects of food and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was three-fold: first, to develop an instrument to evaluate food and beverage service quality in spa hotels; second, to identify aspects of food and beverage service quality of which customers had the highest expectations, i.e. the key dimensions of food and beverage service quality in spa hotels; third, to measure customer perceptions of the spa hotels in this study and to identify those dimensions with the largest gap between customer expectations and perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to 331 customers at four different spa hotels in Balikesir, Turkey. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was used to identify service quality dimensions. Cronbach Alpha indicated the reliability of the factors identified. Customer expectations, perceptions and gaps between expectations and perceptions for each dimension were measured.

Findings

Factor analysis revealed six quality dimensions: “assurance and employee knowledge”; “healthy and attractive food”; “empathy”; “tangibles”; “responsiveness of service delivery”; “reliability”. Customer expectations were highest for “tangibles” and “assurance and employee knowledge”. The largest gaps between perceptions and expectations were for “healthy and attractive food” and “tangibles”.

Practical implications

Key dimensions for food and beverage service quality in spa hotels were identified and a reliable instrument for measuring provision was developed. This should be applied by managers on an ongoing basis to evaluate their performance and give them a better understanding of food and beverage service quality in spa hotels. The study provides specific information on the performance of Turkish spa hotels in relation to food and beverage service quality.

Originality/value

This research addresses the paucity of research on customer perspectives of food and beverage provision in spa hotels and contributes to enhanced understanding of spa tourists and their expectations and perceptions of the service quality of food and beverage service quality.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Chinho Lin and Watcharee Lekhawipat

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of online shopping experience and habit in relation to adjusted expectations for enhancing online repurchase intention.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of online shopping experience and habit in relation to adjusted expectations for enhancing online repurchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed partial least square (PLS) as a technique used to analyze the measurement and structural models. Data for this research were collected from 240 Taiwanese online shoppers who had experienced online shopping at least four times.

Findings

The result of this study indicates that online shopping habit acts as a moderator of both customer satisfaction and adjusted expectations, whereas online shopping experience can be considered a key driver for customer satisfaction. Furthermore, the research findings confirm that customer satisfaction is a vital driver of adjusted expectations and online repurchase intention. Adjusted expectations do mediate the impact of online repurchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This paper highlights the effect of online shopping experience and online shopping habit on enhancing repurchase intention. The result implies that the acquisition of usage experience and spontaneous purchases not only leads to higher customer satisfaction and customer expectations, but also strengthens online repurchase intention. The use of self-report scales suggests the possibility of a common method bias. Future studies may further test the robustness of this study in the interplay of experience and habit to shed more light on their relative importance in explaining online repurchase intention.

Originality/value

This study extends expectancy-disconfirmation paradigm, especially in the context of online shopping, by emphasizing cognitive, affective, and behavioral change on the attitude-intention behavior of online shoppers.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Jukka Ojasalo

This article is based on an empirical study and describes an approach for managing customer expectations to achieve long‐term quality and customer satisfaction in…

Abstract

This article is based on an empirical study and describes an approach for managing customer expectations to achieve long‐term quality and customer satisfaction in professional services. Professional services are somewhat different from other types of services, and often so are customer expectations. This article describes three types of expectations typical in the professional services context: fuzzy, implicit, and unrealistic. These types of expectations may represent a dangerous pitfall for long‐lasting customer satisfaction. Managing expectations is important since service quality and satisfaction result from how well the actual service performance, in other words the service process and outcome, matches the expectations. Much can be done to achieve long‐lasting satisfaction with sophisticated expectations management. This article suggests that making fuzzy expectations precise, implicit expectations explicit, and unrealistic expectations realistic, facilitates long‐term quality and customer satisfaction. The expectations‐management approach introduced in this article is particularly important when the goal is to create long‐term customer relationships.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Beibei Dong

This paper aims to conceptually and empirically differentiate between two types of customer participation (CP): CP as “producers” (CPP), when customers primarily…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conceptually and empirically differentiate between two types of customer participation (CP): CP as “producers” (CPP), when customers primarily contribute physical labor to produce a service (e.g. assembling a frame), and CP as “designers” (CPD), when customers primarily share information to design a service (e.g. designing a frame). The study examines whether CPD and CPP influence customers’ perceptions of value creation and choice of participation differently. Furthermore, it investigates the moderating effect of customer expectation on the effect of CPD/CPP on customers’ participation responses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses two scenario-based experiments. Study 1 examines the main effect of CPP and CPD on perceived value of participation and participation choice, and Study 2 investigates the moderator of customer expectation.

Findings

Study 1 indicates that CPD creates greater value and is a more preferred participation choice than CPP. Study 2 further suggests that the differential advantage of CPD over CPP becomes weakened with a CPP expectation and amplified with a CPD expectation.

Research limitations/implications

This research helps reconcile current mixed empirical findings in the literature and opens up a new stream to enrich the theoretical understanding of CP. Its use of consumer psychology theories also adds a consumer psychological perspective to CP research.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates that not all CPs are equal, offers guidelines to design and manage CP and suggests managing customer expectations so as to enhance the appeal of CPP in light of its productivity implications.

Originality/value

This study represents a pioneering work to empirically differentiate two types of CP and offers a new perspective for understanding the complexity of CP.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Mengnan Qu, Sara Quach, Park Thaichon, Lorelle Frazer, Meredith Lawley, Denni Arli, Scott Weaven and Robin E. Roberts

This study aims to examine the effect of country of origin (COO) on customers' value expectation and willingness to pay by employing signalling theory and cue utilisation.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of country of origin (COO) on customers' value expectation and willingness to pay by employing signalling theory and cue utilisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 386 customers via an online survey in the context of Australian food retail franchise stores in China.

Findings

The findings indicate that COO origin is an important determinant of customer expectations including service quality, social value, emotional value, monetary price, behavioural price and reputation. Furthermore, the only social value was a significant predictor of willingness to pay. Although the direct effect of COO on willingness to purchase was not significant, the COO had a significant indirect effect on willingness to pay via social value. Finally, the COO has a stronger effect on monetary price expectation among customers who were aware of the country brands than those who were unaware.

Originality/value

The study extends the body of knowledge related to the effect of COO during the pre-purchase process and provides important implications for retailers who are looking to enter an overseas market such as China.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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