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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Rahim Ajao Ganiyu

Western management philosophy and thought have been around for millennia; however, the supremacy of its concepts and writings has become a subject of criticisms in Africa…

Abstract

Western management philosophy and thought have been around for millennia; however, the supremacy of its concepts and writings has become a subject of criticisms in Africa. There is a huge gap in African management education which calls for redesigning of management curriculum to affirm African social orientation and self-determination that will enable new forms of learning and knowledge required to tackle complex global challenges. The objective of this chapter is to review Western management thought and practice vis-à-vis the existing management philosophy in Africa prior to her colonisation and advocate the need to redesign management curricula. To accomplish the aforementioned objective, this chapter took a historical, reflective and systematic approach of literature review to advance renewal of management curricula in Africa. The analysis began with a review of pre-colonial management philosophy and thought in Africa, followed by a discussion of how colonialism obstructed and promoted the universality of management. This was followed by a review of African traditional society and indigenous management philosophies. The chapter discussed topics that should feature in an African-oriented management curriculum and highlighted fundamental constructs that can be fused into management curriculum of business schools/teaching in Africa. The chapter also made a case for a flexible management curriculum structure that is broader than the conventional transmission-of-knowledge building which views students as passive learners’ by adopting suitable pedagogical tools that will be relevant for knowledge transmission and assessment and also enhance learning and management practices that is culturally fit and relevant to global practice.

Details

Indigenous Management Practices in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-849-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Irina A. Chernikova and Evangeline Marlos Varonis

In a time that could be described as a “perfect storm” in higher education, faculty and administration have been exploring all possible tools to attract students and help…

Abstract

Purpose

In a time that could be described as a “perfect storm” in higher education, faculty and administration have been exploring all possible tools to attract students and help them stay on a curriculum path so they can graduate within a reasonable time. The purpose of this paper is to explore three strategies for riding the storm in a large mid-western USA university.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify three strategies for increasing student retention and course completion, including: increased choices in scheduling; redesigning the curriculum; and offering multiple options for mode of delivery. In addition, the pilot of these strategies in a Technical Data Analysis class will be described and evaluated.

Findings

Providing choices in scheduling courses (strategy 1), redesigning the curriculum to offer flexible pathways to graduation (strategy 2), and offering students options in delivery modes (strategy 3) increase the likelihood of student success, allowing them to find a way out of and therefore escape the “perfect storm” that higher education finds itself in today.

Practical implications

Flexibility in scheduling courses by offering multiple delivery modes increases student access while maintaining the same learning objectives and outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a known challenge in higher education and offers three strategies to improve retention and completion.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Nienke Nieveen and Wilmad Kuiper

This chapter addresses the balancing act between curriculum guidance and curriculum space, against the backdrop of an integral curriculum review at the national/macro…

Abstract

This chapter addresses the balancing act between curriculum guidance and curriculum space, against the backdrop of an integral curriculum review at the national/macro level in the Netherlands, labelled ‘Curriculum.nu’. As part of this review initiative, many choices have to be made, reflecting answers to the following two questions: What balance is needed between curriculum regulation at the macro level and the provision of curricular space for schools at the meso and the micro level? And, what are the related responsibilities of all involved in the educational system web in order to make the curriculum change successful? Before getting to tentative answers, the chapter will provide an introduction to curriculum policy in the Netherlands and will offer an overview of the motives, aims, approaches and preliminary results of Curriculum.nu. The provisional answers include a set of research-informed principles for making the curriculum review efforts a success, including a call for dovetailing the various curriculum layers and for a strategic curriculum mix of room for school-specific decision-making, substantive guidance, support by exemplification and firm investments in professional development.

Details

Curriculum Making in Europe: Policy and Practice within and Across Diverse Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-735-0

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Michael K. McCuddy, Musa Pinar and Elizabeth F.R. Gingerich

The whole process of reviewing and redesigning curricula is an exercise in managing change. Given the multiple stakeholders in the educational enterprise, the many forces…

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Abstract

Purpose

The whole process of reviewing and redesigning curricula is an exercise in managing change. Given the multiple stakeholders in the educational enterprise, the many forces that impact upon those enterprises, and the organized and complicated activities in which those enterprises engage, the management of curricular change can be a daunting challenge. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that this challenge can be met by adapting and applying knowledge and techniques from the discipline of organizational development and change (ODC) and by including student feedback as an important source of diagnostic input in the change process.

Design/methodology/approach

A process used in one American school of business for incorporating meaningful student input into the curriculum review and planning process is described. The paper reports on the use of a student survey and student focus group to generate feedback in two areas of the college's curricular concerns: the structure, operation, and impact of an introductory business course offered in the first year of the undergraduate experience; and second, the potential addition of majors, minors, and a course requirement in the business school's curriculum. The paper explains how the survey and focus group were used, summarizes the results provided by each diagnostic venue, and discusses how the diagnostic information is currently being used in the college's curricular design process.

Findings

It was recognized that there are many drivers of curriculum development, most importantly the needs and desires of employers for educated people who have the skills and competencies that can help their organizations survive and succeed. Employers constitute the ultimate marketplace for the output of educational institutions.

Originality/value

It is hoped that this example application of ODC techniques for diagnosing the need for curricular change will stimulate others to embrace ODC as they think about the broader issues of change in educational institutions, and in responding to needs for curricular change.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Christopher Bajada and Rowan Trayler

– To introduce to the special issues on threshold concepts in business education.

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697

Abstract

Purpose

To introduce to the special issues on threshold concepts in business education.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an overview of the various papers comprising this special issue.

Findings

There are no specific findings in this paper as its purpose is to introduce the selected papers in this special issue.

Originality/value

Editorial.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Lynne Eagle, David Low, Peter Case and Lisa Vandommele

This paper aims to report on findings from the first phase of a longitudinal study of undergraduate business students’ attitudes, beliefs and perceptions concerning…

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2054

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on findings from the first phase of a longitudinal study of undergraduate business students’ attitudes, beliefs and perceptions concerning sustainability issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To improve understanding of the potential effects of changes in the curriculum, business students enrolled during the academic year prior to a redesigned, sustainability-informed, curriculum were surveyed. Familiarity with key sustainability terms was tested using a semi-structured questionnaire applied across two campuses of James Cook University, Australia. Quantitative data were complemented by use of open-ended questions that yielded qualitative insight into a range of student knowledge, attitudes, behaviours and normative influences relating to sustainability and climate change.

Findings

Findings reflect naïve awareness of the potential impact of individual contributions to sustainability and environmental challenges. They reveal a tendency to regard major issues as beyond personal control and to view solutions as being the responsibility of others. This is coupled with reluctance to consider major lifestyle changes.

Social implications

Universities are increasing their focus on sustainability-related issues and the ways in which these can be effectively communicated via curricula. This paper carries implications for this societal agenda, particularly in relation to the need to address disconnections between awareness of issues, personal relevance and effective strategies for addressing sustainability issues.

Originality/value

The findings shed fresh light on the attitudes and behavioural dispositions of undergraduate business students and could help guide the development and delivery of curriculum content.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Amy Brown

The purpose of this paper is to review a year-long project entitled SaP@Parsons, which aims to bridge the gap between our current foundation degree curriculum and a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review a year-long project entitled SaP@Parsons, which aims to bridge the gap between our current foundation degree curriculum and a revised curriculum where research and enterprise education were interwoven throughout, helping to better equip our graduates with the enhanced capacity to generate ideas and the skills to make them happen QAA (2012). The project used Student as Producer as a theoretical framework to embed research and enterprise into the curriculum. It was originally led by Professor Mike Neary at the University of Lincoln.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects on the process of embedding research and enterprise education into the curriculum, including the experiences of the author and students.

Findings

It was found that reorientation of the curriculum is possible, without integrating enterprise specific learning aims into the programme to embed enterprise and research, can have a positive impact on both staff and student experience.

Practical implications

The paper provides a summary of strategies and examples of the effective use of Student as Producer as a framework for helping to embed research, enterprise and employability into a foundation degree curriculum and the resultant positive outcomes. The setting for this was HE provision within an FE college.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the innovative nature of the project in seeking to engage students in research and enterprise from level 4, rather than levels 6 or 7 within College-based Higher Education, through working with local social enterprises.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Anh Tuan Nguyen and Nguyen Vang-Phuc Nguyen

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best practices of industrial engineering (IE) programs that could be learnt and used at other educational institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the best practices of industrial engineering (IE) programs that could be learnt and used at other educational institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine IE programs in the USA are benchmarked using a conceptual framework that considers an educational program as a system consisting of a purpose, a curriculum, resources, and quality processes. The information used in benchmarking is collected from the program self-study reports, course catalogs, and websites which are available on the internet.

Findings

It is found that in spite of their diversity in history, missions, sizes, and reputations, the studied programs are rather unified in terms of purpose definition, curriculum formation, resource selection, and quality process usage. From the analysis, a template of IE curriculum is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

As the selection of the studied programs is based on the availability of the information, the findings may not be representative for IE programs in the USA. Future work can aim at comparing IE programs from various countries.

Practical implications

The findings could be used as benchmarks by IE schools interested in the improvement of operations.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework for benchmarking is proposed and proves useful for comparing educational programs. The findings represent the current best practices at IE schools in the USA.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2022

Anne Magro, Lisa Marie Gring-Pemble and Charish R. Bishop

In College Learning for the New Global Century, the National Leadership Council of Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) argue for a liberal education for all…

Abstract

Purpose

In College Learning for the New Global Century, the National Leadership Council of Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) argue for a liberal education for all students because “(i)n an economy fueled by innovation, the capabilities developed through a liberal education have become America’s most valuable economic asset.” (LEAP, 2007). The Business for a Better World Center and the School of Business at George Mason University endorse this view and have applied the liberal education approach to the study of business. This paper aims to explore the current environment of business education, the role of liberal education and the school’s programs and their benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relies on a case-study approach.

Findings

In this paper, the authors explore how George Mason University’s School of Business brings a liberal education approach to business education and draws on a combination of high impact practices, such as first-year seminars, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, collaborative assignments, undergraduate research, community-based learning, internships, capstone courses and projects and diversity and global learning (Kuh, 2008). Mason’s experience demonstrates the feasibility and benefits of this integration.

Originality/value

This case study provides unique insight into how business schools can integrate a liberal education approach into business education with successful results. As such, the paper contributes to the growing body of research on the benefits of liberal arts and business education models as a means of addressing global goals and provides a valuable case study to understand better the necessity of integrative, interdisciplinary learning.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Kevin Moloney

Examines undergraduate corporate communications, and argues that the division into marketing and non‐marketing components is only partial. Students' curriculum choices…

Abstract

Examines undergraduate corporate communications, and argues that the division into marketing and non‐marketing components is only partial. Students' curriculum choices often reflect society's rejection of political activity, but involvement in marketing communications can lead to conflictual activity. Presents the case for redesign of the curriculum to reflect the unity of communications, and provides a short, political economy analysis of UK organizations.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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