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Book part
Publication date: 3 February 2015

Ann E. Ebe

This chapter details a cultural relevance of text project in-service K-12 teachers engage in during their graduate literacy methods class. Through this project, teachers…

Abstract

This chapter details a cultural relevance of text project in-service K-12 teachers engage in during their graduate literacy methods class. Through this project, teachers, who work with emergent bilinguals, learn how to select culturally relevant texts using a rubric. They read their selection with a student and reflect on the experience. Four important conclusions came from an analysis of the projects teachers carried out. Teachers found that their students made connections and were more engaged when reading culturally relevant books. Participants found the rubric helpful in identifying what they should look for in a culturally relevant text. In addition, through this project, the teachers discovered that their libraries tended to lack culturally relevant literature. Finally, participant teachers learned more about their emergent bilingual students through the process of finding and reading culturally relevant stories. While this project was carried out by a limited number of teachers in urban environments, it has implications for teachers of emergent bilingual students in other contexts.

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Research on Preparing Inservice Teachers to Work Effectively with Emergent Bilinguals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-494-8

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Jennifer D. Turner and Chrystine Mitchell

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to highlight the gradual release of responsibility (GRR) model as an instructional framework for enacting culturally relevant

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to highlight the gradual release of responsibility (GRR) model as an instructional framework for enacting culturally relevant literacy pedagogy in K-8 classrooms.

Approach – First, the authors frame a discussion on culturally relevant pedagogy via three central tenets and its significance for promoting equity and access in literacy education. Next, culturally relevant pedagogy is linked with the GRR model. Finally, authentic literacy practices that help bridge culturally relevant learning throughout the segments of the GRR model are delineated.

Findings – The authors believe that GRR models infused with culturally relevant pedagogical practices make literacy learning more equitable and accessible to students of Color. Toward that end, the authors provide multiple research-based instructional strategies that illustrate how the GRR model can incorporate culturally relevant pedagogical practices. These practical examples serve as models for the ways in which teachers can connect with students’ cultural backgrounds and understandings while expanding their literacy learning.

Practical implications – By demonstrating how K-8 teachers scaffold and promote literacy learning in ways that leverage diverse students’ cultural experiences, the authors aim to help teachers sustain students’ cultural identities and nurture their socio-critical consciousness.

Details

The Gradual Release of Responsibility in Literacy Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-447-7

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Roxanna Senyshyn and Ann Martinelli

The purpose of this paper is to report on a collaborative project and study implemented by two teacher educators in an elementary education program. To prepare teacher…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a collaborative project and study implemented by two teacher educators in an elementary education program. To prepare teacher candidates for field experiences and practicum in a diverse (bilingual) urban school, the program uses coursework to impart asset-based pedagogies and practices.

Design/methodology/approach

In this mixed-method case study, this paper examined the awareness and perspectives of preservice teachers (n = 26) to cultural and linguistic diversity and relevant teaching and learning practices. In particular, this study gauged their engagement with multicultural children’s literature in a collaborative interclass activity. The data sources included beginning and end of semester survey responses, notes on participant interactions during the mid-semester collaborative interclass activity and participant retrospective reflections about the activity.

Findings

This paper found that teacher candidates showed increased awareness and positive shifts in perspectives. This study also ascertaind that, in learning to become culturally (and linguistically) responsive and sustaining teachers, they benefited from collaborative peer work that focused on learning about multicultural children’s literature, analyzing it and planning to integrate it into their classrooms.

Originality/value

Studies show that culturally relevant literature in schools is beneficial; however, teacher candidates often lack knowledge of such literature and how to use it. This need is especially critical and relevant when learning about and implementing culturally relevant and sustaining practices. The collaborative undertaking discussed in this study fills this gap through co-teaching and interclass activity that brings preservice teachers as a cohort to collaboratively learn about, discuss, reflect on and plan lessons as they prepare to work with students from different backgrounds than their own.

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Nathaniel Bryan and Christopher C. Jett

Much of the extant research literature on the initiatives to attract, inspire and recruit Black males to the teaching profession has focused on middle and high school…

Abstract

Purpose

Much of the extant research literature on the initiatives to attract, inspire and recruit Black males to the teaching profession has focused on middle and high school students. Black boys’ socialization into dominant narratives regarding who can and cannot become teachers occurs as early as in early childhood classrooms; however, little attention has been given to ways to attract, inspire and recruit them to the professional teaching ranks where a paltry 2 per cent are Black men.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the concept of imaginative play experiences with respect to Black boys and unearths possibilities for future Black male teachers through culturally relevant play.

Findings

Based on findings from the literature, this conceptual paper makes connections between the early childhood play literature and the Black male teacher recruitment and retention literature to create possibilities to inspire Black boys to enter the teaching profession.

Originality/value

This paper presents a nuanced integration of imaginative play and culturally relevant pedagogy with specific attention to Black males.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Culturally Responsive Strategies for Reforming STEM Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-405-9

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2015

Beverly J. Klug

There is a long history of school failure for Aboriginals1 in the U.S. educational system. Culturally relevant/responsive pedagogy affords opportunities for Aboriginal…

Abstract

There is a long history of school failure for Aboriginals1 in the U.S. educational system. Culturally relevant/responsive pedagogy affords opportunities for Aboriginal students to achieve academic success through building upon their cultural heritages and Native ways of knowing. School systems adopting this pedagogy empower Indigenous students to connect with essential knowledge for academic success in today’s world. This enhanced pedagogy creates classrooms of involvement that promote Aboriginal students’ achievement. Preservice teachers employing this pedagogy will experience success with their Indigenous students and learn about Aboriginal communities, lifeways, and values. Mutual respect is engendered as long-perpetuated negative stereotypes of Native Americans are undone. Culturally relevant/responsive pedagogy can be tailored to specific populations by incorporating their own Aboriginal knowledge, languages, and practices into teaching praxis.

Details

International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part B)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-669-0

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Abstract

Details

Culturally Responsive Strategies for Reforming STEM Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-405-9

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Velma Johnson, Jan Carpenter, Centae Richards and Kathleen Brennan Vincent

The purpose of this paper is to explore how, and to what degree, culturally responsive field experiences influence the knowledge, beliefs, perspectives and abilities of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how, and to what degree, culturally responsive field experiences influence the knowledge, beliefs, perspectives and abilities of teacher candidates in an educator preparation program (EPP).

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers conducted a mixed methods study using a pre-/post-Likert scale survey regarding pre-service teacher beliefs, reflections, Professional Learning Communities (PLC) meetings and observations by the researchers.

Findings

Teacher candidates expressed greater confidence in their ability to perform culturally responsive tasks by the end of their first field experience, but also indicated ambivalence toward the importance of those tasks.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s limitations include the small number of participants, the short timeframe of the study and it was year one implementation of a new model.

Practical implications

A community mapping experience called the Neighborhood Treasure Hunt (NTH), in conjunction with the other components of the educator preparation program, impacted teacher candidates’ understanding of culturally responsive teaching practices, their perception of their ability to perform them and the importance of culturally responsive teaching. Each program component is necessary to raise awareness and effect change.

Originality/value

Based on the research of Ladson-Billings (1994) and Author 1 (2007), the NTH was intentionally integrated into the field experience component. Author 1 (2007) was involved in this process adding integrity, authenticity and originality to the research study with teacher candidates in an EPP.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Sawaros Thanapornsangsuth and Nathan Holbert

Many initiatives seek to engage children in maker education. However, there is a paucity of research examining children’s engagement in making in low-income formal school…

Abstract

Purpose

Many initiatives seek to engage children in maker education. However, there is a paucity of research examining children’s engagement in making in low-income formal school settings. Likewise, little work has been done to explore the transformative perspectives of both the children and the people around them. This study aims to explore a Culturally Relevant Constructionist Design framework that emphasizes making as a way of building connections to ones’ community. The participants’ shifting perspectives and receptivity in engaging in maker activities that involve making inventions for their community, inspired by the nation’s most beloved figure, King Bhumibol are evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates fourth-grade students, a teacher and community members around a public school in Thailand. Using qualitative research methods, data collection includes interviews, field notes observation, photos and videos of the sessions. This paper presents three case studies that represent the shifting perspectives and receptivity of teachers, community members and students through engaging in making experience. The first case illustrates the ways in which building for others supports the students’ formation of an identity of a creator. The two cases describe a teacher and a community member who developed new-found perceptions of students as valuable contributors to the community.

Findings

The findings highlight making inventions for the community as ways to connect teachers, community members and students together. The study also identifies key perceptions and experiences that empower students’ as contributors to their community. Through the process of making, the teacher and the community members also developed new-found positive perspectives of the students. Particularly, they viewed the students beyond traditional school performance metrics, and considered their other latent abilities.

Practical implications

This study discusses these findings in light of previous research on maker education especially in low-income communities. It also showcases the role of making for the betterment of the community as a tool for engendering change in schools and empowering students to design and make personally and socially meaningful projects. The study also highlights how design-based research carried out in the international context, particularly in Thai locality and classrooms.

Originality/value

This study argues against the deficit lens that assumes a low sense of expectation for what students from lower-income schools can do. Students hold unique worldviews that lead them to create innovations relevant to their local and cultural needs. The study addresses this gap by designing a framework that emphasizes making relevant cultural connections to students’ communities. The study also showcases maker-centered experiences that enable students to express their ideas, to cultivate relationships, to help others and to see themselves in new ways. The perspectives of the participants hold implications beyond the predominant focus of maker education initiatives.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Tonia R. Durden and Stephanie M. Curenton

In this chapter, we dismantle the current educational rhetoric that pervasively characterizes Black children as being at-risk, deficient, or underachievers. Instead, we…

Abstract

In this chapter, we dismantle the current educational rhetoric that pervasively characterizes Black children as being at-risk, deficient, or underachievers. Instead, we replace this deficit-oriented rhetoric with one that encapsulates the cultural and educational excellence that inspires Black children to reach their potential. First, we provide an overview of the current educational landscape for Black children and articulate by whom and how Black children are being educated. Next, we then define educational success and excellence within the context of an African-centric perspective of holistic development and wellness. Then, we highlight programs, schools, and approaches that have been successful in educating Black children. Finally, we identify key principles and guidelines in educating Black children that will have educational, research, and policy implications.

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

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