Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Jacqueline M. Torres, Annie Ro and May Sudhinaraset

Age at migration is commonly utilized as a proxy measure for assimilation in health behavior research. We reconsider this approach by examining the role of continued…

Abstract

Age at migration is commonly utilized as a proxy measure for assimilation in health behavior research. We reconsider this approach by examining the role of continued connection with places of origin on alcohol use, an important marker of health behavior and overall population health. Cross-border connections may buffer the association between earlier age at migration and alcohol use by providing an alternative channel of influence for behavioral norms. Alternatively, a stress and coping perspective on cross-border ties suggests potentially countervailing adverse impacts of these connections on alcohol use. We used data from the 2002/2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) (n = 1,641/1,630 Asian and Latino origin respondents, respectively). We first estimated the association between age at migration (child/adolescent versus adult migrant) and any past-year alcohol use. We subsequently tested the interaction between age at migration and two measures of cross-border connections. All models were stratified by region of origin and gender. For Latin American-origin women, cross-border ties were associated with increased risk of past-year alcohol use among those who migrated early in life. In contrast, Asian-origin men and women who migrated as adults and had contact with family and friends abroad had the lowest predicted probabilities of past-year alcohol use. The results among Asians support the idea that cross-border ties may be alternative influences on health behavior outcomes, particularly for adult migrants. Overall, we find qualified support for both transnational and assimilationist perspectives on alcohol use behaviors among US immigrants – as well as the interaction between these two frameworks. The joint influences of cross-border ties and age at migration were observed primarily for immigrant women, and not always in expected directions. We nevertheless urge future research to consider both US and country of origin influences on a wider range of health and health behavior outcomes for immigrants, as well as the potential intersection between US and cross-border connections.

Details

Immigration and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-062-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Rekha Rao-Nicholson and Zaheer Khan

The recent increase in the presence of emerging market firms (EMFs) in global markets requires a closer examination of their international marketing strategies (including…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent increase in the presence of emerging market firms (EMFs) in global markets requires a closer examination of their international marketing strategies (including branding). The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors behind the standardization or adaptation of global marketing strategies adopted by EMFs for their cross-border acquisitions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the determinants of the marketing strategies adopted by Indian and Chinese firms for their cross-border acquisitions. The drivers of the standardization/adaptation of marketing strategies (including branding) are identified using both quantitative data collected in 168 cross-border acquisitions conducted by the EMFs mentioned above and the institutional theory and organizational identity literature.

Findings

Institutional factors have a stronger effect than organizational identities on global marketing strategies, including branding. The standardization of the EMFs’ marketing strategies is driven by the private statuses of the acquirers, legal distances, target countries’ economic development, and the ethnic ties that exist between the home and host countries. The acquirers’ decisions to retain the targets’ brand identities, thus adapting their global marketing strategies, are related to the cultural distances, economic freedom distances, and sizes of the targets.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, two large emerging markets – India and China – are used to gather the empirical data; future works can expand upon this line of research and examine other EMFs.

Practical implications

The acquiring companies have to decide whether to adopt an adaption marketing strategy, with reference to the acquired targets’ local stakeholder requirements, or to incorporate their targets’ brands into their own global marketing strategies.

Originality/value

Typically, previous work on the adaptation vs standardization of global marketing strategies adopted in the wake of cross-border deals has focussed on acquisitions involving companies from developed countries; this paper extends the field of research to the EMFs of two of the most important developing countries: China and India.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Anita Kit-Wa Chan, Lucille Lok-Sun Ngan, Anthony K.W. Wong and W.S. Chan

Cross-border students – children who are permanent residents of Hong Kong but live on the mainland and travel across the border to school every day – have been an…

Abstract

Purpose

Cross-border students – children who are permanent residents of Hong Kong but live on the mainland and travel across the border to school every day – have been an important social, educational and political issue in Hong Kong. Nevertheless, current discussions regarding this issue focus mainly on the group of students whose parents are Chinese residents and seldom examine the wider contribution of social, geo-political, global-economic and policy changes to the phenomenon. These shortcomings have limited the understanding of the role of the state and the varied needs of these child migrants from diverse family backgrounds. This paper aims to address these gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

It proposes to bring changing border and immigration policies in Hong Kong back into the current analysis and offers a case study of border history. It revisits publications on Hong Kong’s immigration and migration policies, official statistics and government policy papers and (re)constructs the border changes that took place during the period from 1950 to 2013, which led to the rise and complexity of cross-border students.

Findings

This critical historical review offers two important findings: First, it reveals how the government, through its restrictive and liberalized border regulations, has constrained and produced different types of cross-border families. Second, it shows that cross-border students come from diverse family configurations, which have adopted cross-border schooling as a family strategy.

Originality/value

These findings underscore the importance of historical perspective, the wider context in migration studies, the centrality of the state in migrant families and a differentiated understanding of child migrants.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2008

Hsi‐Mei Chung

Based on the panel data analysis of Taiwan’s family business groups from 2000 to 2002, this research attempts to investigate the relationships among the types of ownership…

Abstract

Based on the panel data analysis of Taiwan’s family business groups from 2000 to 2002, this research attempts to investigate the relationships among the types of ownership structure, particularistic ties, and the engagements in regional markets from a social capital perspective. The result indicates that a family business group’s use of particularistic ties is contingent on its relative centralization in decision‐making. Consequently, the family business group’s use of particularistic ties in subsidiaries significantly influences its engagements in regional markets. This study highlights the possible role of particularistic ties as a kind of firm‐specific advantage existing within family business groups when expanding internationally. Furthermore, it indicates that the indigenous particularistic ties intrinsic to Great China societies have implications for multinational companies in the context of this region.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

David K. Jesuit and Lawrence Sych

The purpose of this study is to apply a model of regional networks and governance to cross‐border cases for the purpose of identifying determinants that help local…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to apply a model of regional networks and governance to cross‐border cases for the purpose of identifying determinants that help local governments overcome barriers and promote interaction in border areas most susceptible to globalization realities, namely “old economy” manufacturing and industrial centers. It aims to draw together research from a variety of perspectives on regional networks and explore efforts by two local European communities and one local US community to respond to the challenges posed by the global economy by interviewing stakeholders in territories that have experienced significant deindustrialization.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with local, regional and central government officials, as well as private sector actors, in the Italian region of the Marches and in the countries of Luxembourg and the USA.

Findings

The study's preliminary findings show a range of networks across several arenas closely associated with economic development, but fail to show direct associations with economic development alone. The authors attribute this to the centrality of geographic space in development augmented by local competition and presence of the international border.

Originality/value

The authors conclude by identifying a set of determinants that will guide future research into local networking in cross‐border economic development and related arenas.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Expert briefing
Publication date: 4 October 2016

Outlook for India-Pakistan ties.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB214057

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Andreas Steck and Kristian Landegren

The German Banking Act (the Act) sets out the licensing requirements for the provision of cross‐border financial services into Germany. The licensing requirements under…

Abstract

The German Banking Act (the Act) sets out the licensing requirements for the provision of cross‐border financial services into Germany. The licensing requirements under the Act incorporate the old licensing regime as well as subsequent EU regulations. The licensing requirements for non‐European Economic Association (EEA) credit institutions were not sufficiently addressed in the Act. Consequently, controversy surrounds the lawfulness of crossborder financial services by non‐EEA institutions in Germany. While, however, the German Financial Supervisory Authority (Bundesanstalt fürinanzdienstleistungsaufsicht, the BAFin) followed a liberal licensing policy, this dispute was mainly academic. In April, 2002, the BAFin published a letter expressing its intention of changing this liberal policy. Market participants voiced concerns at the proposed changes to the BAFin policy. This paper describes the statutory background of the licensing requirements and discusses the possible consequences for the market of the policy change.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Eva Karayianni, Elias Hadjielias and Loukas Glyptis

The purpose of this paper is to study the way in which family ties influence the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the way in which family ties influence the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were carried out with 15 Cypriot family business owners hosted in various countries. The paper draws on social capital theory and uses an abductive analytical approach.

Findings

The findings of this paper illustrate that family ties coming from the family across borders play a significant role for diaspora family business owners’ entrepreneurial preparedness. Hidden values deriving from the interpersonal relationships within the family across borders drive the diaspora family business owners to learn upon self-reflection and become entrepreneurially prepared, led by both urgency and esteem.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications for the entrepreneurial preparedness of diaspora family business owners and those who wish to become family business owners in a diaspora context.

Originality/value

This study contributes theoretically through the conceptualization of “family across borders social capital” and “diaspora entrepreneurial preparedness”. It also contributes empirically to the fields of diaspora family business, entrepreneurial learning and diaspora entrepreneurship through new knowledge regarding the role of family across borders social capital in the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Nikos Tsakiris, Panos Hatzipanayotou and Michael S. Michael

We examine the allocation of a pre-determined amount of aid from a donor to two recipient countries. The donor suffers from cross-border pollution resulting from…

Abstract

We examine the allocation of a pre-determined amount of aid from a donor to two recipient countries. The donor suffers from cross-border pollution resulting from production activities in the recipient countries. It is shown that the recipient with the higher fraction of aid allocated to public abatement and with the lower emission tax, receives a higher share of the aid when the donor allocates aid so as to maximize its own welfare. Competition for aid reduces cross-border pollution to the donor when recipients use the fraction of aid allocated to pollution abatement as a policy to divert aid from each other. But, it increases cross-border pollution when recipients use the emission tax to divert aid from each other.

Details

Theory and Practice of Foreign Aid
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-52765-3

Content available
Graphic analysis
Publication date: 19 May 2016

With migration reversing, violence falling, infrastructure improving and trade growing, cross-border ties look healthy

1 – 10 of over 3000