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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Michael Truong and Anne Zanzucchi

In this chapter, we explore how new technologies, namely, video essays, audio-based feedback, and electronic portfolios, can transform traditional composition curriculum…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore how new technologies, namely, video essays, audio-based feedback, and electronic portfolios, can transform traditional composition curriculum and deepen student learning. We begin by discussing how new technologies connect and enhance learning experiences, especially within writing-intensive courses. For each of the three technologies, we provide a brief literature review, give a local case study, and conclude with suggested applications and related resources.

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Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Social Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-239-4

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Stéphane Jaumier and Thibault Daudigeos

Past research on collectivist-democratic organizations has attributed their distinctiveness to their socio-political goals and democratic decision-making and largely…

Abstract

Past research on collectivist-democratic organizations has attributed their distinctiveness to their socio-political goals and democratic decision-making and largely ignored their work processes. This ethnographic study examines how such organizations resist alienating forms of work even in the face of direct competition with for-profit companies. It focuses on Scopix, a French cooperative sheet-metal factory where the first author spent one year as a shop-floor worker. Cooperators there developed various practices to retain an emancipatory dimension to their work, regularly putting forward “craft ethics” as a counterweight to the sheet-metal industry’s drive to rationalize work processes. Drawing on the sociology of worth, the authors analyze how these practices emerged from the arrangements that workers made between the industrial world on the one side and the domestic and inspired worlds on the other. This study contributes to the literature into two main ways. First, the authors refine the sociology-of-worth framework by conceptualizing the emancipatory dimension of work as the result of ad hoc arrangements between different worlds. Second, the authors highlight the need for the literature on collectivist-democratic organizations to increase its focus on work, introducing the concept of work degeneration as a step in that direction.

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Organizational Imaginaries: Tempering Capitalism and Tending to Communities through Cooperatives and Collectivist Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-989-7

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Leanne Morris and Greg Wood

This paper aims to propose a model of ethics education for corporate organizations framed as an holistic approach to the problem of how to teach ethics.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a model of ethics education for corporate organizations framed as an holistic approach to the problem of how to teach ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

As a conceptual/viewpoint piece, this paper recognizes that for ethics education to be successful, individuals and corporations must have an appreciation of their role in the society at large. In addition, there needs to be preparedness on the part of the corporation to engage in an ethical manner with the marketplace with which it interacts.

Findings

Ethics education should not exist in a vacuum, that is just within the organization, but it should reflect the values of the organization as they impact upon and are impacted upon by society in general.

Research/limitations/ implications

This model is predicated on a belief that organizations must craft their ethics education program with as much care and enthusiasm as they craft their strategic plan. The employees are the organization's representatives and they need to be made as clear as one can make them as to the ethical philosophy of the company and what is expected of them. Adults have a capacity for greater reasoning and reflection on their life experiences than children and thus the concept of “andragogy” provides a more satisfactory method to fashion education programs for adults than some more traditional methods that focus on training and not education.

Practical implications

When considering the ethics education of its employees, corporations need to place that education in context as it relates to the organization and the wider society as a whole. It is suggested that an ethics education program needs to provide a framework for understanding the concepts of ethics and moral development. Using this framework as the basis for the education offered, the education program is then expanded into an examination of a range of ethical issues presented in a variety of ways.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an integrated way to approach ethics education that ensures that the antecedents of the program are considered in the context of the ethics of individuals, the society and in turn the organization, hence the holistic approach.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Sean Valentine, David Hollingworth and Bradley Eidsness

There is reason to believe that an ethically minded approach to hiring and the development of an ethical context should be associated with incremental decreases in…

Abstract

Purpose

There is reason to believe that an ethically minded approach to hiring and the development of an ethical context should be associated with incremental decreases in employees’ perceptions of ethical conflict. It is also likely that the selection of ethical employees, and the reduced ethical conflict that follows, are positively related to employees’ positive work attitudes. The purpose of this paper is to test these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a self-report questionnaire, information was collected from 187 employees working for a medium-sized financial services organization with offices located primarily in the Midwestern USA.

Findings

Results of structural equation modeling indicated that employees’ perceptions of ethics-related selection were negatively related to perceived ethical conflict, and that reduced ethical conflict and enhanced ethics-related selection were associated with an increased positive work attitude, which was comprised of job satisfaction, an intention to stay, and organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The results cannot prove causal association between the constructs, and the use of one focal firm limits generalizability.

Practical implications

Organizational leaders and HR professionals should develop ethics-based hiring practices to reduce ethical conflict and strengthen a company's ethical context.

Originality/value

This investigation is relevant because strong relationships among ethics-related hiring, ethical conflict, and positive work attitudes would suggest that companies must use ethical selection criteria and maintain an ethical culture/climate that meets or exceeds employees’ expectations about ethics. Furthermore, this study adds to the relatively few published works exploring the relationship between ethical conflict and work attitudes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

K.T. Connor

Ethics in organizations has become a critical issue, one which requires an accurate assessment of ethical vision and of the alignment among various elements of the

Abstract

Purpose

Ethics in organizations has become a critical issue, one which requires an accurate assessment of ethical vision and of the alignment among various elements of the organization. Moreover, the sensitive nature of the concept requires a measurement methodology which counteracts the bias potential of self‐report assessment. This article proposes a way to address these requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

It reviews the importance of addressing the ethics issue and delineates a methodology based on the logic of decision making rather than on taxonomies, codes, and self‐report. The basic understandings of axiology and axiometrics are described, as well as an axiological ethics model. Preliminary organizational analysis yields data addressing the issues of the relative importance afforded to key components of ethics by management and employees, and perceptions of the degree to which an ethical climate exists.

Findings

The data collected indicate that the organization studied had uneven alignment. Management misjudged the level of congruence between management's vision and employees' vision, and there were often wide gaps in both groups between vision and perceived reality. Moreover, some issues that were primary among employees received little attention by management.

Originality/value

The article proposes that this new axiometric methodology transcends the limits of both conventional self‐report and observation measures of sensitive issues, and provides an ideal resource for understanding an organization's targets for ethical training and transformation.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Melissa Dark, Nathan Harter, Gram Ludlow and Courtney Falk

There is an ongoing concern about workplace ethics. Many voices say that our educational system ought to do something about it, but they do not agree about how to do this…

Abstract

There is an ongoing concern about workplace ethics. Many voices say that our educational system ought to do something about it, but they do not agree about how to do this. By the time students reach post‐secondary education, they will have already developed a general moral sense. The concern is whether their moral sense is sufficient for ethical situations in the workplace. If not, post‐secondary education is expected to close the gap. In order to do this, educators need information about what is missing. Educators can set clear, work‐related objectives and use classroom activities to reach those objectives based on an identification of these gaps.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Taoyong Su, Junzhe Ji, Qingan Huang and Lei Chen

The study of business ethics has seldom shed light on small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) despite their theoretical and practical significance. Drawing from strain…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of business ethics has seldom shed light on small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) despite their theoretical and practical significance. Drawing from strain perspective, the purpose of this paper is to address this insufficiency and investigate SME owners’ ethical attitudes toward money-related deviances.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a large sample of 741 Chinese SMEs, an OLS regression analysis was employed to test associated hypotheses. The robustness of results was additionally checked.

Findings

The results suggest that for stratification variables, education level is positively related to ethical attitudes, whereas household income level is surprisingly negatively associated with ethical attitudes; for materialism facets, success and happiness exert a negative impact on ethical attitudes as hypothesized, but centrality has no associated impact.

Research limitations/implications

This study has examined both structural and motivational sources of personal strains on the ethical attitude of SME owners, while the characteristics of these strains could be explored in the future studies.

Originality/value

This study advances and complements the dominant behavior approach that emphasizes cognitive and other psychological processes in explaining individual ethical attitudes. It is also seemingly the first study to examine the influence of three materialism facets on entrepreneurial ethical attitudes.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Peter Hornbæk Frostholm and Steve Walker

From a both theoretical and practical outset, this chapter discusses how the research methodology behind MaCE, The Indirect Approach is realised and applied. This chapter…

Abstract

From a both theoretical and practical outset, this chapter discusses how the research methodology behind MaCE, The Indirect Approach is realised and applied. This chapter also touches upon some of the ethical implications of applying the approach in research. The aim of this chapter is to add some empirical experiences to the initial framework of the approach, by exploring the practical craftsmanship behind the idea of getting answers to questions that you in fact do not ask.

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Combatting Marginalisation by Co-creating Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-451-6

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Tarapuhi Vaeau and Catherine Trundle

In this chapter, we explore the ethics of developing and maintaining meaningful and equitable relationships between Māori and Pākehā scholars and researchers. We begin by…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the ethics of developing and maintaining meaningful and equitable relationships between Māori and Pākehā scholars and researchers. We begin by asking if it is even desirable, viable, or sustainable to pursue decolonising research in disciplines and relationships that are so deeply entrenched in settler-colonialism. We consider the challenges involved in managing an equitable distribution of decolonising labour in settings with few Indigenous scholars, particularly around the constant work of educating and pointing out ignorance, as well as the emotional labour of dealing with Pākehā vulnerability, inaction, and resistance to change. Building on the Kaupapa Māori principles of whanaungatanga and manaakitanga, we suggest a tangible set of seven strategies or ‘collaborative ethics’ to address these challenges in working together and in actively dismantling while privilege and white supremacy within the Academy and wider world of research.

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Indigenous Research Ethics: Claiming Research Sovereignty Beyond Deficit and the Colonial Legacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-390-6

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Linda Brennan and Theresa Savage

The purpose of this paper is to propose guidelines for business enterprises engaging with indigenous communities to protect their intellectual property rights…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose guidelines for business enterprises engaging with indigenous communities to protect their intellectual property rights, particularly indigenous art works produced for the souvenir industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature on indigenous art and souvenirs demonstrating exploitation of indigenous communities’ intellectual property was facilitated by a lack of knowledge of how to otherwise behave. The proposed guidelines for commercial entities wishing to engage ethically with indigenous communities draws on international exemplars.

Findings

A twelve‐point framework for ethical commerce in indigenous souvenirs between indigenous communities and businesses is proposed to ensure populations lacking economic and social power are not disenfranchised by limited experience in a market society.

Social implications

The proposed guidelines contribute to achieving reconciliation between mainstream and indigenous people in various countries throughout the world.

Originality/value

This paper assists development of guidelines enabling ethical decision‐making in the souvenir industry applying a critical approach to the principles of corporate responsibility.

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