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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Diana Saiki and Audrey Robbins

The purpose of this research is to assess trends in information categories featured on costume and textile collection web sites, and to assess differences in the online…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to assess trends in information categories featured on costume and textile collection web sites, and to assess differences in the online capabilities of these features between 1997 and 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

The instrument was a content analysis of costume and textile collection web sites developed from a study completed in 1997. The previous study identified information categories which included hyperlinks to other sites, events calendars and forms to arrange visits, FAQs, online tours, and discussion group links. Information about education programs, contacting staff, volunteering, membership, and museum purchases was also noted. Data were collected from the 60 web sites used in the original study.

Findings

The findings revealed that costume and textile museums were using web sites to stimulate interest in visiting the physical museum. A picture of the artifact does not show all the specific features of an actual costume and textile, and thus the audience needs to actually visit the museum in order to learn about costume and textiles. A comparison of the 1997 and 2006 data revealed an increase in the frequency of features with higher levels of interaction capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to observing web sites and web site information categories documented in the original study.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the information categories that costume and textile museums find most useful to fulfill audience needs and describes trends in the use of information on web sites which can serve as a guideline in developing museum web sites.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2010

Stephen J.J. McGuire, Ellen A. Drost, K. Kern Kwong, David Linnevers, Ryan Tash and Oxana Lavrova

A family business founded by Chinese immigrants grew into a $133 million toy and costume maker by exploiting seasonal niche segments in the highly competitive, global toy…

Abstract

A family business founded by Chinese immigrants grew into a $133 million toy and costume maker by exploiting seasonal niche segments in the highly competitive, global toy industry. Sales of traditional toys stagnated when replaced by game consoles and electronic toys. Unable to compete in high tech toys, MegaToys moved instead toward seasonal products. In 2007, brothers Peter and Charlie Woo were about to pitch what they hoped would be $63 million in Easter basket sales to Wal-Mart. If Wal-Mart took the full order, it would come to represent over half of MegaToys' revenue.

The company was faced with the dilemma of how to grow, and at what pace. Charlie Woo knew that MegaToys could continue to grow as long as it was able to satisfy Wal-Mart's demands. Peter Woo wondered if this was the smartest way to grow the business. “Growth is a good thing as long as you don't sell your shirt to get it,” he noted. Should MegaToys continue to increase its sales to Wal-Mart, or would dependence on Wal-Mart eventually threaten the firm's success? Were there other, untapped opportunities for MegaToys that were well aligned with its strengths, resources, and capabilities?

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Helen J. Waller and David S. Waller

The purpose of this paper is to observe the nature of documentation and the description used in object biographies by an auction house catalogue and an online museum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe the nature of documentation and the description used in object biographies by an auction house catalogue and an online museum collection database in relation opera costumes. This research aims to discuss the issues of cultural and economic value in relation to objects in the art world, and examine examples of object biographies for opera costumes that are sold at an auction and exhibited in a museum.

Design/methodology/approach

The object biographies are compared from an auction house catalogue and the online museum collection database, based on two factors: costumes worn by a famous singer and costumes designed by a famous designer.

Findings

This study identified the valuation methods of auction houses and museums, including accounting for the market value and fair value, as well as social and cultural values. The nature of the documentation also clearly shows the different purpose of the object biographies. For auction houses the biography needs to be short and specific as it provides sufficient information and is read out at the auction, while art catalogues can also be used by experts as part of the conversation to understanding heritage value, and will also be viewed and used by researchers, investors, other auction house specialists and art world professionals.

Research limitations/implications

By comparing two institutions, auction houses and museums, this study has shown that the information that is documented and how it is presented in object biographies is determined by the goals of the institutions. These goals may vary or overlap in providing information, demonstrating cultural importance, to be spoken allowed to an audience and make sales, or to educate, conserve and preserve.

Practical implications

This study shows that to some extent museum online databases display their collection removed from cultural context, with an isolated image of the item, and in an organised, digitally accessible manner. A potential implication is that museums should not only digitally catalogue an item, but also provide discussion and the cultural background and significance of the item.

Social implications

Auction catalogues are written for a specific event (the auction), while the online museum collection database is meant to be a permanent record, which aims to digitally preserve objects and provide access to images and information to a general audience, and further could be edited with amendments or new information when future research or events lead to potential updates.

Originality/value

This study adds to the discourse on approaches to the understanding of costumes as an art object of significance and their potential cultural, economic and heritage value, particularly as represented in the documentation of object biographies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Emily Vardell, Ting Wang and Paul A. Thomas

This study explored the information practices of cosplayers, as well as the social norms, social types and information infrastructure of an online cosplay Facebook group…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the information practices of cosplayers, as well as the social norms, social types and information infrastructure of an online cosplay Facebook group, the Rey Cosplay Community (RCC).

Design/methodology/approach

To better understand individual behavior, the authors made use of ethnographic methods and semi-structured interviews. Observation of the RCC was combined with information gleaned from select participant interviews.

Findings

The results suggest that the RCC can be conceived of as an information community where fans obtain and share information about cosplay costume making. Sufficient and well-organized information and positive community culture greatly help community members make their costumes.

Originality/value

This works serves as a bridge between fan studies and information science research in its exploration of online communities, shared information practices and creating non-toxic virtual environments. It also lends support to the idea that positivity, respect for community rules and a tight-knit connection between members play essential roles in building a non-toxic fan and information community.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Laurentina Vareiro, Bruno Barbosa Sousa and Sónia Sousa Silva

This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Considering the challenges inherent in the efficient…

Abstract

Purpose

This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Considering the challenges inherent in the efficient correlation of these three areas, this study intends to demonstrate the clear benefits resulting from knowledge sharing and effective cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the objectives outlined, the authors conducted a survey of the visitors of the Costume Museum, which was chosen for being one of the unmistakable icons identifying the cultural heritage of Viana do Castelo (Portugal).

Findings

In an increasingly competitive tourist market, with demand resulting from growing specialization, the integration of museological spaces as patrimonial and cultural elements in the supply of tourist destinations is an important factor in differentiation and development.

Research limitations/implications

To enhance the importance of the Costume Museum in the process of the tourist development of the city, it is fundamental to define a clear strategy for attracting and responding to the greatest demand from cultural tourists who are increasingly interested in actively participating in learning experiences. It is believed that a larger sample could strengthen the conclusions, eventually more relevant and closer to the reality.

Practical implications

The results show that visitors to the Costume Museum very positively evaluated the museum with regard to several factors covered in this study. However, there is a great dependence on school visits. On the other hand, lower qualitative evaluations were made by older age groups and those with higher academic degrees, although the evaluations remain positive.

Social implications

The paper presents museums as a possible factor in tourism development and social inclusion, advancing practical measures aimed at social justice through a fairer distribution of tourism revenues and the defence of historic centre residents' way, and quality, of life.

Originality/value

This paper examines the importance of the Costume Museum in the tourist development of Viana do Castelo (Portugal). This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Particular attention is given to visitors' motivations for visiting and their opinions about the quality of service, satisfaction and loyalty regarding this museum.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Jonatan Södergren

Authenticity has emerged as a prevailing purchase criterion that seems to include both real and stylised versions of the truth. The purpose of this paper is to address the…

Abstract

Purpose

Authenticity has emerged as a prevailing purchase criterion that seems to include both real and stylised versions of the truth. The purpose of this paper is to address the negotiation of authenticity by examining the means by which costume designers draw on cues such as historical correctness and imagination to authenticate re-enactments of historical epochs in cinematic artwork.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand and analyse how different epochs were re-enacted required interviewing costume designers who have brought reimagined epochs into being. The questions were aimed towards acknowledging the socio-cultural circulation of images that practitioners draw from in order to project authenticity. This study was conducted during a seven-week internship at a costume store called Independent Costume in Stockholm as part of a doctoral course in cultural production.

Findings

Authenticity could be found in citations that neither had nor resembled something with an indexical link to the original referent as long as the audience could make a connection to the historical epoch sought to re-enact. As such, it would seem that imagination and historical correctness interplay in impressions of authenticity. Findings suggest that performances of authentication are influenced by socially instituted discursive practices (i.e. jargons) and collective imagination.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on social and performative aspects of authentication as well as its implications for brands in the arts and culture sector.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2018

Marcella Martin and Federica Vacca

By considering the role of technology in museum archives and exhibitions, as well as company archives and production, this paper aims to present that digital technologies…

Abstract

Purpose

By considering the role of technology in museum archives and exhibitions, as well as company archives and production, this paper aims to present that digital technologies offer new approaches and tools to consider fashion know-how, traditions and memories.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an extensive literature review and a close consideration of multiple sources, this paper analyzes fashion, tradition and knowledge creation through the lens of museum and company archives. A section on museum archives analyzes the role of fashion in the museum and the use of technology in cataloging, online resources and exhibitions for knowledge transfer of fashion history. The second half of the paper considers the relationship between heritage, company archives and technology in branding and consumer engagement.

Findings

The paper summarizes recent scholarship in the fields of fashion archives and demonstrates the still current importance of heritage in generating new design and exhibition practices. Despite having its roots in the past, heritage demonstrates continuity with the present and looks to the future with the same devotion and commitment, thus guaranteeing quality and authenticity for both museum collections and company productions.

Originality/value

Through a case study methodology, this paper presents how digital technologies can offer new approaches and tools in museum archives and exhibitions, as well as in company archives and collection development, to reconsider and translate fashion know-how, traditions and memories in the digital era.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Hounaida El Jurdi, Mona Moufahim and Ofer Dekel

This research is positioned at the intersection of youth subculture consumption and religious affiliation, through the study of observant Muslim women involved in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research is positioned at the intersection of youth subculture consumption and religious affiliation, through the study of observant Muslim women involved in the highly engaging and codified activity of cosplay. Given authenticity is central to the cosplay visual impact and performance, this study aims to understand the way hijab cosplayers negotiate tensions between authentic body performativity and the observance of religious dressing codes.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative interpretive approach was used to address the research questions. In-depth semi-structured online interviews were conducted with 25 members of a hijab cosplayers from South East Asia.

Findings

The concept of authenticity emerged as multifaceted for hijab cosplayers, where they manage three different aspect of the authentic cosplay performance as follows: authenticity as a cosplayer (social dimension of authenticity), authenticity to the character (personal dimension of authenticity) and authenticity to their religious identity (religious dimension of authenticity). The subsequent malleable authenticity is used to legitimate cosplay as an acceptable performative practice from a religious and from subcultural view.

Originality/value

The research highlights how tensions between identity and performativity of the body are negotiated. More specifically, the study contributes to the understanding of the way hijab cosplayers reconcile tensions between religious identity and the performativity of the body. Given the role of the body as a site for negotiating identity, this study provides important insights in the tensions and strategies at the intersection of authenticity, embodiment and religious identity in youth cultures.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Seoha Min and Helen Koo

This study aims to provide insights to designers for seeking innovative ways to design sustainable clothes and appeal to consumers by enhancing sustainability.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights to designers for seeking innovative ways to design sustainable clothes and appeal to consumers by enhancing sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the research purpose, the researchers went through a design process and designed three prototypes. The experts’ evaluation on the prototypes was positive.

Findings

Various design strategies derived from the Korean traditional costume were explored. Based on the strategies, three prototypes were developed, and the design experts’ evaluation on the prototypes was positive.

Originality/value

The research has implications as follows. The sustainable design process and methods used in this research for developing designs inspired from cultural costumes will provide insights to designers who want to create sustainable garments inspired by a certain culture. In addition, the design and sustainable design strategies, derived from the Chosun Dynasty, will guide apparel designers to create sustainable designs and broaden their perspectives. Furthermore, the research will provide guidance to following researchers who are interested in the topic of sustainability in apparel design. The researchers explored sustainable design strategies from the Korean culture, applied them in their design process and evaluated the design outcomes. By doing so, merits and limitations of the design strategies were more clearly understood.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2016

Xuyun Zhu, Xuming Wen, Jianping Wang and Hang Zhang

Beautiful and simple curves are most commonly employed in apparel design since they can not only simplify the manufacture process, but also significantly beautify the…

Abstract

Purpose

Beautiful and simple curves are most commonly employed in apparel design since they can not only simplify the manufacture process, but also significantly beautify the breast profile of customers. However, it is regularly difficult to choose the most suitable curve when producing the strip costume; this is due to the fact that the curve is a kind of aesthetics without any laws. The quantification and standardization to curves are necessary for fashion design. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the stripe of costumes and the breast profiles of wearers.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven curves drawn derived from the Hogarth theory (Hogarth curves) were firstly diagrammatized by the central line technology using CorelDraw, and the format of bitmaps and quadratic functions of these selected curves were obtained respectively. Simulating formulas were subsequently used to interpret these curves. The standard of curves for apparel design was finally established after being evaluated by comparison between the different types of female breasts and the curves on the costumes.

Findings

The established models indicated that the fourth Hogarth curves was the most attractive one that combining the static state and the dynamic beauty, which could also help females to highlight the beautiful breast shapes.

Originality/value

This work provided the fundamentally understanding of the application of Hogarth curves in fashion design and the improvement on the effectiveness of the garment industry.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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