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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Matthias Kruehler, Ulrich Pidun and Harald Rubner

The major purpose of this paper is the development of a theoretical framework that can be used by corporate practitioners to understand the implicit parenting strategy of

Abstract

Purpose

The major purpose of this paper is the development of a theoretical framework that can be used by corporate practitioners to understand the implicit parenting strategy of their company, assess its performance, and adjust it for improving the net corporate value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a three‐dimensional framework is developed that accounts for corporate‐to‐business and business‐to‐business interactions, value‐adding and value‐destroying activities, and strategic and operational levers. The framework is operationalized by assigning a broad set of individual activities to these levers.

Findings

The paper delivers a robust, systematic, and operational framework to assess the net benefits to a given business of being part of a corporate portfolio, and to identify and evaluate implicit parenting strategies in corporate practice. While previous studies mainly focused on broad parenting approaches with low granularity this framework now allows earlier observations to be substantiated, finer distinctions between the applied strategies to be drawn, and the core of superior value added approaches to be investigated.

Practical implications

The introduced framework can be used to analyze the origin and underlying drivers of conglomerate discounts and premia and thus enhance understanding of capital market valuation of multi‐business companies. The developed framework can also be the basis for the derivation of a typology of corporate parenting strategies. In this way, it can support practitioners in portfolio management – which was also the explicit motivation for the development of the original parenting advantage concept.

Originality/value

The outlined framework will facilitate the investigation of structural, strategic, and organizational roots of superior parenting strategies in corporate practice. It may be used to analyze performance differences of multi‐business companies that go beyond the degree of diversification and may finally contribute to solving the puzzle of the conglomerate discount.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Richard R. Dolphin

This paper reviews an empirical study into corporate reputation strategies in large UK organizations. It considers what is meant by corporate reputation and its role in…

Abstract

This paper reviews an empirical study into corporate reputation strategies in large UK organizations. It considers what is meant by corporate reputation and its role in the strategic marketing communications mix. The findings confirm not only that over the past decade planning and implementation of reputation strategies has become a dominant focus of those concerned with corporate governance but also that the organizational communicator now perceives his or her role as one of guardian of that reputation. It notes further, that between academics and practitioners alike there remains much confusion over the terms reputation and image; are the two one and the same? The findings have implications not only for senior management but also for the development of communication strategies aimed at enabling an organization to gain a competitive advantage in an increasingly overcrowded market place. Evidentially corporate reputation has developed more and more in the UK context – and is now recognized by enlightened management as a key weapon in organizational strategy formulations.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Chengzhi Long and Jing Lin

Though enormous research studies were conducted on corporate environmental responsibility (CER), few of them could empirically justify how CER helps to improve firm’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Though enormous research studies were conducted on corporate environmental responsibility (CER), few of them could empirically justify how CER helps to improve firm’s competitive advantage and firms are still hesitant to incorporate CER with their business strategy at present. The purpose of this paper is to theoretically and empirically explore how the CER strategy could help the firm to gain competitive advantage in Chinese context, particularly in terms of achieving brand sustainability (BS).

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, 310 listed companies in China were chosen as research sample. First, the CER strategies were classified into developing eco-friendly products, adopting EMAS or other eco-management, enhancing the impact of CER through value chain and charitable CER. Second, BS is constructed as two dimensions, i.e. resource-acquisition and consumer impact. Accordingly, this paper analyzed the relationship between CER and BS with regression model analysis, taking account of several moderating and control variables.

Findings

The results indicate that CER strategies have positive effect on BS. Among all CER strategies, developing eco-friendly products and charitable CER undertakings are the most effective ones to promote BS performance. Also, the paper found that the length of time in adopting CER strategy moderates the effect of CER on BS. The empirical evidence proves that CER strategies could enhance the brand value in terms of BS and help the company to gain competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

First, most of our samples are of the state-owned enterprises, so our assumption might not be applicable to other types of business. Second, corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication is an important factor in the relation between CSR and corporate performance, but it is not taken into account in this study. Third, the difference in industries and ownership in this research is out of concern.

Practical implications

As this paper has provided empirical evidence to reveal the effectiveness of different CER strategies, firms in China could be more motivated to undertake CER not only for the sake of environment but also for their brand value and competitive advantage. More importantly, this paper could be a valuable reference for the firms in China to choose suitable and effective CER strategies, as proved in this study, to gain competitive advantage in the market.

Originality/value

At first, while public environmental awareness has improved gradually, we introduce the BS concept to explain how the CER strategies affect CCA. This approach gives us another perspective to highlight the relationship between these two constructs. Second, we conducted our research from practical perspective to explore how to apply the CER undertakings as the company’s strategy. Third, we conducted our empirical research in Chinese context, which will enrich the theoretical CER and CSR literature.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Heike Proff

This paper presents a model of resources refinement for systematically and comprehensively deriving competence-based competitive advantages. Competence-based competitive…

Abstract

This paper presents a model of resources refinement for systematically and comprehensively deriving competence-based competitive advantages. Competence-based competitive advantages support market-based strategies. They reinforce the overall market-based advantages of low costs, product differentiation and minimal cost differentiation at the business unit level and of carrying out tasks jointly in a performance compound at the corporate level. Competence-based competitive advantages also support resource-based strategies by reinforcing the advantages of product innovation skills at the business unit level and transfer of core competences in a performance compound at the corporate level.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

John M.T. Balmer and Edmund R. Gray

Recent environmental trends are forcing senior managers to give greater import to corporate identity and corporate communications. They are discovering that conventional…

Abstract

Recent environmental trends are forcing senior managers to give greater import to corporate identity and corporate communications. They are discovering that conventional methods of redressing identity problems are becoming progressively less effective because, in our opinion, the traditional focus has viewed corporate identity and corporate communication as functional rather than as strategic. We suggest a much broadened view that looks at corporate communication as a three‐part system process – primary, secondary and tertiary. In many companies these three are out of balance. Primary communication should present a positive image of the company and set the stage for a strong reputation. Secondary communication should be designed to support and reinforce primary communication. Tertiary communication should be positive and result in a superior reputation if the other two stages of corporate communication are properly conceived. The authors postulate that senior managers who implement this can invest their organisation with a competitive advantage.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

John M.T. Balmer and Edmund R. Gray

Recent environmental trends are forcing senior managers to give greater import to corporate identity and corporate communications. They are discovering that conventional…

Abstract

Recent environmental trends are forcing senior managers to give greater import to corporate identity and corporate communications. They are discovering that conventional methods of redressing identity problems are becoming progressively less effective because, in our opinion, the traditional focus has viewed corporate identity and corporate communications as functional rather than as strategic. We suggest a much broadened view that looks at corporate communications as a three‐part system process – primary, secondary, and tertiary. In many companies these three are out of balance. Primary communication should present a positive image of the company and set the stage for a strong reputation. Secondary communication should be designed to support and reinforce primary communication. Tertiary communications should be positive and result in a superior reputation if the other two stages of corporate communication are properly conceived. The authors postulate that senior managers who implement this can invest their organisation with a competitive advantage.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Louis Rhéaume and Mickaël Gardoni

This paper aims to illustrate the quick rise in the popularity of corporate universities since the 1990s. Because knowledge management is becoming imperative to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the quick rise in the popularity of corporate universities since the 1990s. Because knowledge management is becoming imperative to the survival and growth of firms in most industries, better management of corporate universities is becoming more and more critical. The purpose of this paper is to analyze three objectives: Why invest in corporate universities? Which model to adopt? and What are the key challenges facing corporate universities in dealing with the adoption of an open innovation approach?

Design/methodology/approach

The article provides a general review of corporate universities dealing with open innovation by using a creative synthesis.

Findings

This paper analyzes the challenges involved in the development of corporate universities and examines how they can deal with open innovation. While few corporate universities have a real strategic role, several initiatives have failed or have been seriously compromised. To create competitive advantages through a corporate university, upper management must dedicate significant resources and have a plan for building the corporate curriculum in order to deal with innovation management.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the lack of scientific articles on the topic, most of the published articles made by practitioners was used. Further studies are needed to test the recommendations and models.

Practical implications

This paper identifies some development models and growth avenues for corporate universities. It helps provide an understanding of the challenges associated with open innovation as well as their limits.

Originality/value

It is among the first papers to link the development of corporate universities with the open innovation approach. It also provides practical advice for managers and academics.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

T.C. Melewar and Abhijit Navalekar

The emergence of the Internet has completely revolutionised industries and has restructured their value chains. Traditional “bricks and mortar” businesses are facing the…

Abstract

The emergence of the Internet has completely revolutionised industries and has restructured their value chains. Traditional “bricks and mortar” businesses are facing the prospects of losing their competitive advantage owing to the emergence of new competitors in the “new economy”. The regulatory changes in the financial services industry and the explosion in the use of the Internet for e‐commerce have given rise to unforeseen competitors in the banking industry – the “non‐bank” financial services providers and the “pure” Internet banks. These competitors are not restrained by the high costs of the branch infrastructure and as a result are able to differentiate on the basis of offering high interest rates. These players are fast and flexible. In spite of being newcomers, they have the potential to grow and recast the rules of the banking industry. Yet, incumbent banks still have the strongest sustainable competitive advantage: their corporate identity. Managers in the “new and old economy” must realise that corporate identity is an important strategic element that should be considered in the need to differentiate.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Ling-Foon Chan, Bany-Ariffin AN and Annual Bin Md Nasir

Corporate diversification is a strategy that enables corporations to expand their core business into other businesses. In Malaysia, corporate diversification continues to…

Abstract

Corporate diversification is a strategy that enables corporations to expand their core business into other businesses. In Malaysia, corporate diversification continues to represent a fundamental organizational structure. Some two-thirds of Malaysian firms are diversified. However, when compared to developed countries such as the US and the UK, we find that firms are moving toward non-diversification. The study is based on the population framework consisting of all of the public limited companies (PLCs) listed on the Bursa Malaysia stock exchange from 2007 to 2012. A dynamic panel model system generalized method of moments (GMM) was used to analyze the diversification and firm’s performance theories.

The empirical findings demonstrated that diversification is better than non-diversification firms for the curvilinear relationship between diversification and firm’s performance (ROA and Tobin-Q) when using the entropy index and relatedness is taken into consideration. The research further concluded that related and unrelated diversification also has a positive relationship with performance, but diversification must be the dominant (focused) and cannot be too broad in nature. Diversification that is too broad may cause a positive relationship to turn in to a negative relationship toward performance in both related and unrelated instances of diversification.

Details

Asia-Pacific Contemporary Finance and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-273-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Peter J.M.M. Krumm, Geert Dewulf and Hans de Jonge

Up to the 1980s the corporate competitive advantage was primarily focused on adapting the corporation to the (changing) environment. In the last decades corporations have…

Abstract

Up to the 1980s the corporate competitive advantage was primarily focused on adapting the corporation to the (changing) environment. In the last decades corporations have become more aware of their resources and capabilities, and of the benefits of managerial attention towards managing the corporate assets. The transition from a passive, reactive attitude towards a proactive service oriented organisation proves to be a difficult task. This paper analyses the transition and describes an effort to identify products and services contributing to the added value of corporate real estate management to the bottom line of the corporation.

Details

Facilities, vol. 16 no. 12/13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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