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Article

Joakim Hans Kembro and Andreas Norrman

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of adopting a contingency approach to configuring omnichannel warehouses. Nonetheless, research on how various contextual

Abstract

Purpose

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of adopting a contingency approach to configuring omnichannel warehouses. Nonetheless, research on how various contextual factors influence the selection of warehouse configuration is scarce. This study fills this knowledge gap by exploring how and why certain configurations fit in different omnichannel contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is conducted with six leading Swedish omnichannel retailers. Focusing on outbound warehouse configurations, data are collected through interviews, on-site observations, and secondary sources. A multistep analysis is made, including both pattern matching and explanation building.

Findings

The qualitative analysis reveals 16 contextual factors, of which assortment range, requested online order fulfillment times, goods size and total transactions are the most influential. The study shows how contextual factors create different challenges, thereby influencing the choice of the configurations. In addition to market dynamics and task complexity, the study describes four categories of the factors and related challenges that are particularly important in omnichannels: speed, space, economies of scale and tied-up capital.

Research limitations/implications

The findings highlight the importance of understanding context and imply that multiple challenges may require trade-offs when selecting configurations, for example, regarding what storage, processes and resources to integrate or separate. To confirm, extend, challenge and further operationalize the ideas and observations put forward in this paper, an agenda with future research issues is given for this accelerating, contemporary phenomenon.

Practical implications

Managers could leverage the frameworks proposed for the contextual profiling of their current and future positions. The frameworks provide support for understanding the important challenges and potential trade-offs and developing aligned configurations.

Originality/value

This study is original in the way it provides in-depth, case study findings about contextual factors and their influence on omnichannel warehouse configuration.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article

Ka Po Cheuk, Saša Baškarada and Andy Koronios

This paper aims to answer calls for more research on how contextual factors influence the effectiveness of knowledge reuse.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to answer calls for more research on how contextual factors influence the effectiveness of knowledge reuse.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based on an in-depth case study conducted in the sales department of a large white goods company in Australia.

Findings

Six contextual factors identified include purpose, time pressure, language, accessibility, author and date. A mismatch in purpose between knowledge creation and reuse is most likely to reduce knowledge reuse effectiveness. Time pressures may lead to an increase in errors associated with search question definition as well as knowledge search and selection, while unfamiliar language is likely to lead to misinterpretations of content. Knowledge accessibility issues are of particular concern in time-sensitive situations. Authorship and creation date information may facilitate knowledge reuse by allowing consumers to filter unwanted knowledge.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge management theory by providing an exploration of the ways in which contextual factors influence knowledge and reuse effectiveness, and of the possible relationships between those factors. The paper also provides knowledge management practitioners with tangible guidelines on how to increase the effectiveness of organizational knowledge reuse.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article

Angeliki Karagiannaki, Dimitris Papakiriakopoulos and Cleopatra Bardaki

Empowered by the possibility to automatically identify unique instances, radio frequency identification (RFID) is expected to revolutionize warehouse processes. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Empowered by the possibility to automatically identify unique instances, radio frequency identification (RFID) is expected to revolutionize warehouse processes. However, every warehouse differs from each other in several ways. Given such dimensionality, a credible assessment of the true value of RFID requires that the contextual factors that differentiate one warehouse from another are taken into account. The same RFID implementation may generate high productivity in one warehouse but not in another, because the former warehouse may have characteristics that may influence the impact of RFID. As a result, the purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for identifying key contextual factors that appear to be contingent on the link between RFID and warehouse performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework derived from a two‐phase research design. The first phase incorporated two case studies. This was an exploratory study and, therefore, there was a great deal of iteration between the cases studies and the literature. The objective was to identify important contextual factors that may moderate the impact of RFID. The second phase incorporated simulation modelling. This was a confirmatory study. The objective was to develop two simulation models of the cases from the previous phase, and as a result, verify the effects of particular contextual factors on process performance.

Findings

As an outcome of this research, an initial subset of “warehouse contextual factors” is developed that may moderate the impact of RFID on warehouse performance. The framework is not an evaluating technique, but is a useful starting point for examining the value of RFID in the warehouse context.

Research limitations/implications

Further work is required to support the significance of the moderating effects of the proposed contextual factors.

Practical implications

For practicing managers the paper directs attention to key warehouse contextual factors that appear to be contingent on the link between RFID and warehouse performance. It also confirms that the achievement of RFID value is attainable only in combination with the redesign of business processes.

Originality/value

The paper integrates both theoretical and practical considerations regarding formalization of the contextual factors that may moderate the impact of RFID on warehouse performance. Therefore, it represents an initial step in building theory to develop guidelines for understanding the variance in the performance between different RFID‐enabled warehouse settings.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article

Zaza Nadja Lee Hansen, Samuel Brüning Larsen, Anders Paarup Nielsen, Anders Groth, Nicklas Gregers Gregersen and Amartya Ghosh

While forward logistics handles and manages the flow of goods downstream in the supply chain from suppliers to customers, reverse logistics (RL) manages the flow of…

Abstract

Purpose

While forward logistics handles and manages the flow of goods downstream in the supply chain from suppliers to customers, reverse logistics (RL) manages the flow of returned goods upstream. A firm can combine RL with forward logistics, keep the flows separated, or choose a position between the two extremes. The purpose of this paper is to identify the contextual factors that determine the most advantageous position, which the paper refers to as the most advantageous degree of combination.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first develops a scale ranging from 0 percent combination to 100 percent combination (i.e. full separation). Second, using the contingency theory the paper identifies the contextual factors described in RL-literature that determine the most advantageous degree of combination. The set of factors is subsequently tested using a case study, which applies a triangulation approach that combines a qualitative and a quantitative method.

Findings

The results show six distinct contextual factors that determine the most advantageous degree of combination. Examples of factors are technical product complexity, product portfolio variation, and the loss of product value over time.

Practical implications

For practitioners the scale of possible positions and set of contextual factors constitute a decision-making framework. Using the framework practitioners can determine the most advantageous position of the scale for their firm.

Originality/value

Much RL-research addresses intra-RL issues while the relationship between forward and RL is under-researched. This paper contributes to RL theory by identifying the contextual factors that determine the most advantageous relationship between forward and RL, and proposes a novel decision-making framework for practitioners.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article

Ademir Macedo Nascimento, Denis Silva da Silveira, Jairo Simião Dornelas and João Araújo

This paper aims to systematize the contextual factors that influence the intention to use citizens and governments-initiated platforms, presenting them as non-functional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to systematize the contextual factors that influence the intention to use citizens and governments-initiated platforms, presenting them as non-functional requirements (NFRs), to facilitate their understanding to implementers.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic mapping of the literature was done to identify the contextual factors from citizens and governments (C2G) adoption, followed by a survey applied to 938 potential users of this type of technology. The results were analyzed through logistic regression to understand the impact of the contextual factors on the intention to use C2G platforms and then those contextual factors were formalized as NFRs represented by a Softgoal Interdependence Graph.

Findings

Among the results, the most prominent factors were the influence of the “users perceived contribution” and the “citizens concern about the city conditions”. Finally, some strategies are suggested to help public managers and developers to optimize the factors that have shown to be significant.

Practical implications

This study can support e-gov policies in the implementation of C2G platforms because several municipalities need assistance in taking actions to foster greater citizens’ engagement. An example of this type of contribution is the indication of the factors of greatest impact in the adoption of use and the indication of paths to be followed if the manager and developers decide to focus on each of them.

Originality/value

The identification of several contextual factors which influence C2G platforms adoption and their systematization with the purpose of jointly visualizing and evaluating them.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article

Susan P. Douglas and C. Samuel Craig

The choice of which country or countries to enter is a critical decision and needs to be made with considerable care and deliberation. Initial market entry decisions have…

Abstract

Purpose

The choice of which country or countries to enter is a critical decision and needs to be made with considerable care and deliberation. Initial market entry decisions have typically focused on country evaluations based on macro‐economic data. While appropriate in providing an initial screening of countries, other factors, notably contextual factors, can provide important insights in assessing international market opportunities. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of context at four distinct levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature on the influence of context on consumption and purchase behavior is reviewed to provide a framework to understand contextual factors as a means to refine entry strategy and develop effective segmentation strategies.

Findings

A wide range of contextual factors exert influence on consumption choices and contribute to within‐country heterogeneity. These are typically examined at the macro‐level, but also need to be examined at the meso‐level, micro‐level and situational level to fully assess market opportunities and establish viable market segments.

Practical implications

Examination of contextual factors provides a richer and deeper understanding of which international markets to enter and which segments to target. Within‐country cultural diversity, dramatic economic and regional disparities and marked differences in the infrastructure need to be assessed. In particular, examination of contextual factors helps to shed light on heterogeneity within countries not only in customer behavior, but also in the nature of the market infrastructure. This is a key element, not only in formulating entry and segmentation strategies, but also in implementing those strategies.

Originality/value

The effect of context has received little attention to date. The current paper highlights the importance of considering contextual factors and their impact on consumption behavior – an issue which has largely been ignored in previous research.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

William James Wilson, Nihal Jayamaha and Greg Frater

This paper aims to theorise and test a causal model of predominantly lean-driven quality improvement (QI) in the context of health-care clinical microsystems, examining…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to theorise and test a causal model of predominantly lean-driven quality improvement (QI) in the context of health-care clinical microsystems, examining the effects contextual factors in this setting have on improvement activity.

Design/methodology/approach

QI practitioners at a New Zealand District Health Board were surveyed on a range of contextual factors hypothesised to influence improvement outcomes. Survey responses were analysed via partial least squares path modelling to test the causal model that was designed to be consistent with the “model for understanding success in quality” (MUSIQ) model (Kaplan et al., 2012) adopted in health-care QI.

Findings

Defined variables for teamwork, respect for people, lean actions and negative motivating factors all demonstrated significant effects. These findings support the representation of the microsystem layer within the MUSIQ model. The final model predicted and explained perceived success well (adjusted R2 = 0.58).

Research limitations/implications

The sample was a non-probability sample and the sample size was small (n = 105), although power analysis indicated that we exceeded the minimum sample size (97 cases). Even though health-care processes have universality, this study was conducted in only one district in New Zealand.

Practical implications

The results support highly functional teamwork as the critical contextual factor in health-care QI outcomes and suggest lean-driven process improvement can be a valid mediating mechanism. The key recommendation for practitioners is to increase focus on human resource capability when initiating and supporting QI.

Originality/value

The originality is testing the robustness of the MUSIQ model specifically in a lean environment, which provides the context for QI. The paper provides a more detailed specification of contextual factors acting as exogenous variables that moderate the cause (lean actions) and the effect (perceived success).

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article

Paurav Shukla

The consumer culture in recent times has evolved into one of the most powerful ingredients shaping individuals and societies. Although the behavioural intentions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The consumer culture in recent times has evolved into one of the most powerful ingredients shaping individuals and societies. Although the behavioural intentions and purchase decisions related models continue to dominate research and managerial practice, a deeper look indicates that most studies do not take the complete picture in account and study parts of the above mentioned phenomena. Furthermore, consumers operate in a dynamic and ever‐changing environment which in itself demands a re‐examination of their behavioural intentions and purchase decision influences from time to time. This paper aims to focus on these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the context of the young adults market, this study looks into how contextual factors vis‐à‐vis loyalty and switching impact consumer purchase intentions. The study involved both qualitative and quantitative research methodology.

Findings

The findings suggest that contextual factors have the strongest influence on purchase decisions. Furthermore, contextual factors influence the brand loyalty and switching behaviour.

Practical implications

The findings provide important insights with regards to the factors on which practitioners should focus to better tailor their content and approaches.

Originality/value

The study supplies unique learning to managers and researchers alike, through conceptualising and subsequently empirically verifying the issue of purchase decision, brand loyalty and switching with regard to contextual factors.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Franciele Bonatto, Luis Mauricio Martins de Resende and Joseane Pontes

The goal of this research is to establish which contextual factors influence the selection of relational governance instruments in supply chains (SCs) and how these factors

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this research is to establish which contextual factors influence the selection of relational governance instruments in supply chains (SCs) and how these factors impact the expected performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review (SLR) identified 103 conceptual, empirical and analytical studies between 2007 and 2017.

Findings

A conceptual framework is developed from the categorization of contextual factors, relational governance instruments and expected SC performance. The conceptual framework provides three propositions: (1) The choice for relational governance instrument is influenced differently by the contextual factors; (2) the impact that the contextual factors have on the governance instruments and SC performance is mediated by trust; (3) The SC performance is affected differently by the instruments of flexibility, solidarity and information sharing.

Practical implications

The findings of this research can help business managers better govern and know the contextual factors and use different relational governance instruments and trust dimensions to drive the expected results of the SC.

Originality/value

The synthesis reveals contingencies of relational governance instruments in SCs for performance expected in different contexts and proposes a standpoint for further research in the area.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Andreas H. Glas and Florian C. Kleemann

Performance-based contracting (PBC) links pricing with performance objectives in service business relationships. Although interest in PBC has surged recently, there is…

Abstract

Purpose

Performance-based contracting (PBC) links pricing with performance objectives in service business relationships. Although interest in PBC has surged recently, there is still great uncertainty about the risks, opportunities and challenges. This paper aims to provide a deeper understanding of the contextual factors of PBC and how providers assess them.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes conducting a multiple-case study evaluation and analyzes data from 21 cases. Risks, opportunities and contextual factors are identified through interviews, and the case data are analyzed with several methods, including Borda count and cross-tabulation.

Findings

The results show that the most important factors of PBC are clear responsibilities, clear performance indicators, transparent measurement, cooperative culture and a precise utilization profile of core assets. Surprisingly, incentives are of minor perceived relevance. The analysis supports the differentiation of PBC into two subcategories: lean (low integrated) and customized (high integrated) PBC.

Research limitations/implications

While many studies stress the uniqueness of PBC in accordance with the “one-size-does-not-fit-all” mantra, this research differentiates the standardized PBC from a customized one. The findings face the limitations of case study research and qualitative data analysis in general.

Practical implications

Practitioners are provided with guidance to develop either a customized or a standardized PBC.

Originality/value

Previously, broader empirical insights have still been rare; thus, this paper contributes to the PBC literature, as it provides data from multiple cross-industry cases. The findings (e.g. the minor relevance of incentives) stand in contrast to parts of the academic literature and contribute also to the wider service management field.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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