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Book part
Publication date: 11 January 2012

Su Jin Jez

African American females make up two-thirds of African American postsecondary enrollments and 60% of all African Americans with at least a bachelor's degree. How do…

Abstract

African American females make up two-thirds of African American postsecondary enrollments and 60% of all African Americans with at least a bachelor's degree. How do brothers and sisters with shared experiences have such markedly different outcomes? I find that African American females are more likely than African American males to apply to college, to attend college, and to attend two-year colleges, four-year colleges, and selective colleges. Students' backgrounds, academic achievement, and Catholic school attendance explains the differences in the type of colleges African American females and males attend, but fail to explain differences in college application and attendance rates.

Details

Black Female Undergraduates on Campus: Successes and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-503-7

Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2012

Tanom Intarakumnerd

This practitioner's chapter presents a “how-to” approach to establishing a college system that is decentralized and rooted in local communities, using the Thai system as…

Abstract

This practitioner's chapter presents a “how-to” approach to establishing a college system that is decentralized and rooted in local communities, using the Thai system as an example. The Thai system “borrowed” programs from US community colleges – offering associate degrees, certificate programs, continuing education programs, and remedial education. While the author presents clear challenges that these institutions face, he is optimistic that the community college system is a positive aspect of the Thai higher education system.

Details

Community Colleges Worldwide: Investigating the Global Phenomenon
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-230-1

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

MARGARET WAITERS

In 1946 the Fyfe Report on Technical Education first recognised the need for libraries in Further Education colleges in Scotland, and suggested certain specifications for…

Abstract

In 1946 the Fyfe Report on Technical Education first recognised the need for libraries in Further Education colleges in Scotland, and suggested certain specifications for this type of library. Two later reports, on Technical Education in 1956 and on Libraries in Technical Colleges in 1957, progressed from the Fyfe Report and laid down recommendations and guidelines concerning the provision of library services in technical colleges. Since that time, there have been other reports and publications concerning the standards to be followed by these libraries. By the end of the 1960s it was accepted that Further Education colleges should provide a library and should appoint a qualified librarian to administer that library.

Details

Library Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Elizabeth Nelson

This literature review aims to look at the unique role of community colleges as they address the information literacy needs of their students, who are by nature…

1127

Abstract

Purpose

This literature review aims to look at the unique role of community colleges as they address the information literacy needs of their students, who are by nature continuously in transition to and from the institution.

Design/methodology/approach

Library science databases and online sources were reviewed for relevant information.

Findings

Community colleges are addressing the needs of their various student populations in a variety of ways.

Originality/value

The role of the community college library is underrepresented in the literature. This review provides more information about the unique role that community colleges fill in the higher education ecosystem.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Helen Connor

The second in a series of four articles that seek to answer questions about where and where not action learning is most applicable. Aims to identify the kinds of people…

397

Abstract

The second in a series of four articles that seek to answer questions about where and where not action learning is most applicable. Aims to identify the kinds of people who benefit most from action learning and the most appropriate times in their lives to undertake an action learning programme. The authors reflect on their own experience as action learning participants and set advisers to identify those who have got most and least out of action learning. Concludes that action learning has worked best with people who are willing and able to take action, are skilled at reflection and want to take responsibility for their own learning. Such people are likely to be mature adults who want to learn about themselves, as well as the world they inhabit, with a view to changing both themselves and their worlds.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Renard Y.J. Siew

– This paper aims to share the success story of a residential college based in Australia through a case study approach.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to share the success story of a residential college based in Australia through a case study approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the setup of the college in terms of its management structure, demographics of residents, sustainability initiatives and the resident life programs which run every semester. A survey was conducted to gather feedback from the residents and identify areas for future improvement.

Findings

Generally, residents are satisfied with the living conditions. Affordability, the collegiate experience and the convenience of living on campus are primary factors affecting the decision of residents to move into a residential college.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into the management of a residential college which has not been discussed in the literature.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1965

JOHN WELLENS

The technical college is a unique institution. Within Britain itself it is unique as an educational instrument; in the world at large the technical college, as it works…

Abstract

The technical college is a unique institution. Within Britain itself it is unique as an educational instrument; in the world at large the technical college, as it works out in practice, is uniquely British.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 7 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Deborah Goodall

Academic franchising has provided opportunities for many thousands of students who would otherwise have been excluded from higher education. Yet, despite the continued…

856

Abstract

Academic franchising has provided opportunities for many thousands of students who would otherwise have been excluded from higher education. Yet, despite the continued presence of franchised courses, the approach has been, as far as possible, to make them fit in alongside traditional courses. Reports some of the work carried out by CERLIM at the University of Central Lancashire during the two‐year Library Support for Franchised Courses in Higher Education project, which was part‐funded by the British Library. Notes the differences in provision between college and university libraries and examines the student experience within this context. Identifies weakness in provision and describes the students’ coping strategies. Presents the practical implications of this work as suggestions to library managers for improving practice in the college and university libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Toni King and Sara Meddings

The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary outline of the international presence, commonality and differences between Recovery Colleges.

1322

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary outline of the international presence, commonality and differences between Recovery Colleges.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a short e-mailed survey to create a map of Recovery Colleges internationally and review Recovery Colleges outside the UK. Questions gathered descriptive and qualitative data to gain an overview of the mode of delivery and aspects respondents felt were noteworthy.

Findings

This paper identifies Recovery Colleges in 22 countries in five continents (including the UK). Participants described wide variance in their context. Despite adaptations, the operational models and inherent principles of each were closely aligned to those developed in the UK.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first baseline of Recovery Colleges on an international scale. It provides evidence of a high degree of commonality despite variance in setting and highlights the internationally valued transformational power of this model.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1973

FJ Speckeen

Community colleges are distinctive types of institutions and should not be looked upon as an extension of the high school nor as the lower years of a university. They are…

Abstract

Community colleges are distinctive types of institutions and should not be looked upon as an extension of the high school nor as the lower years of a university. They are institutions in their own right with a special sensitivity to local needs. Local autonomy is critical to the development of the community colleges. A special emphasis is placed on practical experience in employing faculty members. The emphasis in these colleges is on teaching, not on research. Technical‐vocational programmes are recommended, supported and evaluated, by Advisory Committees of knowledgeable and highly interested laymen. University transfer courses are offered after close consultation with the universities. Adult Education (Extension) is a major emphasis of community colleges, with colleges operating at all hours of the day and week in order to meet local needs and interests. The community colleges stress the open door policy whereby mature students are given opportunities to prove themselves, although lacking formal educational requirements. The enrolment of part‐time students is increasing dramatically. Community colleges function in and out of warehouses, store fronts, playgrounds, old military, bases, etc. Community colleges have not provided educational programmes to any great extent via correspondence courses; however, the television medium is gaining in popularity. Community colleges are generally commuter colleges. Most colleges do not have student residences. Community colleges are more flexible and imaginative, less obstructed by, or interested in, traditional ways of doing things. Community colleges are faced with a shortage of funds as they attempt to meet their objectives.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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