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Article
Publication date: 26 May 2021

Charles Carvalho, Fallan Kirby Carvalho and Sheldon Carvalho

In this paper, we provide a brief understanding of the field of managerial coaching, specifically, offering insights on what has been studied and ideas on where the field…

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219

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, we provide a brief understanding of the field of managerial coaching, specifically, offering insights on what has been studied and ideas on where the field can move forward.

Design/methodology/approach

We review managerial coaching research, focusing in particular on its consequences and determinants. Based on the review, we uncover three areas that will help advance the development of managerial coaching research.

Findings

Our review indicates that both individual and contextual factors influence managerial coaching. Managerial coaching is beneficial not only for employees but also for managers who engage in coaching and the teams they manage. Despite the overwhelmingly positive view of managerial coaching, emerging research addresses the detrimental effects of coaching on managers who engage in coaching. We call on researchers to undertake more work on the factors that reduce managers’ inclination to coach, dark side outcomes of coaching, and role of individual and contextual factors in influencing the effects of coaching.

Originality/value

By reviewing extant managerial coaching research as well as suggesting fruitful avenues for researchers to explore, this paper serves as a useful guide for scholars interested in contributing to the emerging body of research on managerial coaching.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2019

Lydia Loizides

Talentedly is a startup focused on delivering accessible, actionable, and affordable one-on-one professional coaching virtually and at scale. By leveraging technology to…

Abstract

Talentedly is a startup focused on delivering accessible, actionable, and affordable one-on-one professional coaching virtually and at scale. By leveraging technology to deliver every aspect of the experience, Talentedly is able to ensure the quality and consistency of service and measure the impact that professional and career coaching has on individual and business outcomes. This case study explores three areas of professional coaching in the digital age: market size and overall state of coaching in the US market, a review of meta-analyses that measure the impact of coaching on the individual and company, and the outcomes, potentially predictive, of self-assessment criteria on the completion of virtual one-on-one professional coaching.

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Udo Richard Averweg

This paper has the aim of exploring whether virtual coaching in an organisation may be facilitated and enabled by intranet technology for the creative dialogue of e‐coaching.

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1354

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has the aim of exploring whether virtual coaching in an organisation may be facilitated and enabled by intranet technology for the creative dialogue of e‐coaching.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the e‐coaching, the enabling role of technology, and intranet technology and intranets literature is undertaken. It is then argued that by adopting an autopoietic view of an intranet, virtual coaching may be facilitated and enabled by intranet technologies for the creative dialogue of e‐coaching in an organisation.

Findings

Rather than intranet technology and intranets being simply an add‐on to established processes in an organisation, technology and coaching are synthesised into something new and exciting in the e‐coaching domain.

Research limitations/implications

The six implications for organisations suggested in the paper are not inclusive, but may provide an avenue for research in the evolving e‐coaching domain. A research entry point may be the development and validation of a theoretical framework for e‐coaching.

Practical implications

In order that e‐coaching may be seen as a development partnership, six implications for organisations are suggested.

Originality/value

E‐coaching can be seen as a developmental partnership in which much learning can take place using e‐mail but will be augmented by the enabling role of an intranet.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Coral Ingleton

The purpose of this paper is to share the author's viewpoint on coaching and its benefits. It also aims to cover using coaching as a development tool and how reciprocal

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2225

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the author's viewpoint on coaching and its benefits. It also aims to cover using coaching as a development tool and how reciprocal coaching can be of benefit to organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The author's approach to this paper is to consider how she became involved in coaching and the developments that evolved.

Findings

The paper provides insights into coaching as a development tool and how to “grow” coaches within organisations.

Practical implications

The paper includes development of a coach as manager strategy, as well as the development of a coaching and mentoring network.

Originality/value

The paper describes the value of coaching within organisations.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Peter Bluckert

In this article the author, Managing Director of the leading coaching and coach training company, Peter Bluckert Coaching, and founder member of the European Mentoring and…

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3720

Abstract

In this article the author, Managing Director of the leading coaching and coach training company, Peter Bluckert Coaching, and founder member of the European Mentoring and Coaching Council, sets out a personal view on the current state of the coaching market. That market, and, indeed, the profession of coaching, is fairly young, but it is one that he expects will undergo significant changes in the next few years, spurred by the demands of an increasingly discerning client base. Clients will look to employ coaches who are truly adding value and coaches will need to differentiate themselves in the market place through the quality of their initial training, the extent to which they are committed to ongoing personal development and supervision and their ability to operate at a deeper level with individuals. The author welcomes the greater professionalisation of coaching and looks to a lead body to take forward that process of change.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Lorna J. Stewart and Stephen Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to raise organization's and practitioner's awareness of how to maximise coaching investment via enhancing coaching transfer.

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2005

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise organization's and practitioner's awareness of how to maximise coaching investment via enhancing coaching transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a research project that comprised two sub‐studies. The first employed used semi‐structured interviews and qualitative analysis techniques to explore coachees' (N=25), coaches' (N=9) and organizational stakeholders' (N=5) perceptions of a successful coaching outcome and the facilitators and barriers to transfer. The second study administered a self‐report questionnaire developed from the results of Study one to coachees (N=110) to explore possible relationships between transfer and coachee motivation, work environment psychosocial factors and situational factors.

Findings

Coachees, coaches and organizational stakeholders described coaching outcomes as comprising intra‐personal development, personal and performance outcomes. Further, they described transfer as associated with a pro‐development organizational climate, psychosocial support and the coachee having a pro‐development attitude. Correlational analyses of questionnaire data supported these findings.

Research limitations/implications

The findings were based on self‐report. Despite the limitations of self‐report data, they provide a useful indication of the factors which likely impact on coaching transfer.

Practical implications

The findings are valuable in that they provide practical guidance to assist organizations and practitioners maximise coaching investment.

Originality/value

Although this study drew on training transfer research, it was original in the field of coaching.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Carol Wilson

The aim of this paper is to focus on how to create a coaching culture in organizations through coach training and external coaches.

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7803

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to focus on how to create a coaching culture in organizations through coach training and external coaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The writer draws on her experience in corporations as a board director and as a consultant to organizations in the field of coaching.

Findings

Conclusions are drawn about the effectiveness of coach training over external coaches and the best ways of implementing a coaching culture.

Practical implications

Advice is given regarding: the principles of a coaching culture; how to launch a coaching program; a ten point plan for implementing a coaching culture; how to choose external coaches; how to choose coaching skills training; challenges of coaching in the workplace; informal coaching in the workplace; and uses for coaching skills in the workplace.

Originality/value

The writer's broad experience of designing and delivering cross cultural coaching programs, and as a board level director, enable her to challenge existing concepts, to offer original solutions and to describe the pitfalls inherent in implementing any coaching program.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Peter Bluckert

The paper aims to examine the coaching relationship as a critical success factor in executive coaching. It also aims to set out the characteristics of a successful coaching

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9346

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the coaching relationship as a critical success factor in executive coaching. It also aims to set out the characteristics of a successful coaching relationship and how to establish it.

Design/methodology/approach

The basic proposition of this article is set out in the introduction – that the coaching relationship is not just a critical success factor, but arguably the critical success factor in successful coaching outcomes. From there, the characteristics of a successful coaching relationship are explored. The link is made to client‐centred counselling and to the influence of “Rogerian” thinking. Key characteristics of the coaching relationship such as rapport, trust, support and challenge are critically examined. Finally, the implications for coach training are set out.

Findings

The arguments presented here point to a need to shift the emphasis of coach training more strongly towards the coaching relationship.

Originality/value

A great deal of current literature about executive coaching is focused on models and techniques: this article challenges that approach and reminds the reader of the importance of the coaching relationship as a critical success factor in executive coaching.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Laura Ashley‐Timms

This paper aims to demonstrate how commercially effective business coaching can and should be implemented.

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1510

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how commercially effective business coaching can and should be implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on both external sources and personal experience both as a coach herself and as the Director of Coaching for a specialist coaching company, the author discusses the main obstacles to successful coaching and how they should be overcome to maximise the return on investment for the sponsoring organization.

Findings

The piece delivers accessible suggestions for increasing the return on investment of coaching programmes.

Practical implications

With these suggestions in mind, the common pitfalls can be avoided, allowing companies access to the best, and most profitable, coaching.

Originality/value

Where other authors examine the benefits of coaching in terms of productivity and personal benefit for employees, the author brings into play the often‐forgotten commercial element, explaining how to ensure that the coaching implemented is a success in every sense.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

David Rock and Ruth Donde

The purpose of this two part paper is to outline a new way of utilizing coaching to drive wide scale organizational change.

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5956

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this two part paper is to outline a new way of utilizing coaching to drive wide scale organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors illustrate the various benefits to using internal coaches, flesh out the cost benefits, and highlight a range of ways that organizations can integrate coaching into their people, performance and culture frameworks. It covers training, design and implementation issues as well as looking at aligning coaching models with the organization's strategic approach. The paper draws on extensive case studies and posits some best practice principles, then addresses some of the key questions around this topic. This paper draws on interviews with over 50 internal coaches over two years, and several other research papers on this topic.

Findings

It illustrates how training leaders to be internal coaches is a more scalable, sustainable and robust approach to driving change and improving performance than hiring external coaches. Early indicators are showing significant increases in retention, engagement, productivity and performance, as well as ROI (17x), across organizations that have developed internal coaching.

Research limitations/implications

Data is critical to understanding coaching impacts within organizational contexts. Thanks to those organizations using measurement, impacts to the business can be determined.

Originality/value

This positive data is significant for organizations making decisions about introducing coaching initiatives, driving organizational change or adopting a coaching culture.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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