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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Wietze A. de Vries and Robert A. Fleck

Conversion to client/server systems from host‐centric systems can be accomplished with careful attention to planning and development procedures. A key component in a…

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1176

Abstract

Conversion to client/server systems from host‐centric systems can be accomplished with careful attention to planning and development procedures. A key component in a successful conversion is a customized definition of client/server which complements the organization’s mission. Another key component is the development of an infrastructure which includes hardware, software and people. The training of users and design personnel is crucial to successful conversion. Discusses definitions, strategies, hardware, software, and the pitfalls to be avoided.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 97 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

C. Bruce Kavan, Margaret T. O’Hara, Edward C. Patterson and Robert P. Bostrom

This paper uses the Socio‐Technical Systems (STS) model as a conceptual framework to explore client/server information system implementations, and demonstrates the logical…

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1167

Abstract

This paper uses the Socio‐Technical Systems (STS) model as a conceptual framework to explore client/server information system implementations, and demonstrates the logical disconnect between traditionally developed mainframe systems and the flexibility required to meet rapidly changing environments. Such flexibility can be afforded by client/server and web enabled technologies; however, to exploit these technologies, managers must improve the interaction between the technical and social systems of the organization during the information systems development process. In this paper, conditions for successful implementations are presented along with a technology migration model based upon the characteristics of and flexibility afforded by these newer technologies.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Louise Bugg

This article presents ten issues in migrating a multi‐type library consortium to a shared client/server library system. The issues have been selected as especially…

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1000

Abstract

This article presents ten issues in migrating a multi‐type library consortium to a shared client/server library system. The issues have been selected as especially pertinent to a consortium and describe the migration experiences of the Detroit Area Library Network (DALNET), a consortium of 20 academic, public and special libraries in the Metropolitan Detroit area. The issues are: (1) more control to member libraries; (2) pre‐migration decisions; (3) Web interface design; (4) training; (5) consortium staffing; (6) communication; (7) system maintenance; (8) security issues; (9) telecommunications network; and (10) commitment of member libraries. The capabilities of the client/server system will enable the consortium to provide new information and new information services not possible before, and will help consortium staff to meet the challenges of such a complex migration.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

David J. Greene

While most automation suppliers are willing to follow the technology trend and build products in order to stay current with market demand, the truly innovative and…

Abstract

While most automation suppliers are willing to follow the technology trend and build products in order to stay current with market demand, the truly innovative and entrepreneurial company is setting expectations and providing forward‐thinking solutions for its customers. Blindly shifting all development resources into a client/server solution without fully understanding the longevity and future implications of the technology will ultimately lead to accelerated obsolescence, a short‐term customer base, and, finally, failure to forge long‐term partnerships with customers. Having almost 20 years of experience providing long‐term solutions and strong partnerships with its customers, the author believes that Innovative Interfaces has been able to look beyond the current technology and anticipate the needs of the future. A current example of the foresight and evolutionary approach to the introduction of new technology is demonstrated through Innovative's client/server architecture. To ensure that every INNOPAC customer has a system that can continue to grow and remain current into the next century, Innovative has introduced INNOPAC Millennium and is redefining client/server expectations.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Brian McWilliams

Discusses the measurement of client server payback. suggests that companies should not be using return on investment because financial yardsticks cannot measure directly…

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334

Abstract

Discusses the measurement of client server payback. suggests that companies should not be using return on investment because financial yardsticks cannot measure directly the long‐term competitive advantage given by increased productivity and communication related to information systems.

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Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Geoff Fellows

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137

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Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Charles Farley, Susan Beck and Julia Miller

Geac Computers, Inc. is now in its twenty‐fourth year as a library system supplier. For the past year and a half, Geac has been combining the resources of recently…

Abstract

Geac Computers, Inc. is now in its twenty‐fourth year as a library system supplier. For the past year and a half, Geac has been combining the resources of recently acquired CLSI with its own to create a “new” Geac, a company focused on developing advanced information systems and superior service programs to meet the needs of libraries for the future. Geac's sole product development and design goal is to provide libraries with the most advanced technology available to enable them to manage and deliver information from a variety of sources worldwide. The measured transition to client/server architecture from the current centralized character‐based design is an example of Geac's adaptation of the latest technology to meet the needs of libraries. Networking is an important component of Geac's systems for the future. As more information becomes available in electronic formats via a variety of networks, it is important that Geac systems provide fast, easy, transparent access to it. The ultimate objective of Geac's client/server and network development is to provide fast, easy access to all types of data, wherever it resides.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Parag C. Pendharkar and James A. Rodger

client/server(C/S) systems have revolutionized the systems development approach. Among the drivers of the C/S systems is the lower price/performance ratio compared to the…

Abstract

client/server(C/S) systems have revolutionized the systems development approach. Among the drivers of the C/S systems is the lower price/performance ratio compared to the mainframe‐based transaction processing systems. Data mining is a process of identifying patterns in corporate transactional and operational databases (also called data warehouses). As most Fortune 500 companies are moving quickly towards the client server systems, it is increasingly becoming important that a data mining approaches should be adapted for C/S systems. In the current paper, we describe different data mining approaches that are used in the C/S systems.

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Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

H. Joseph Wen

An intranet puts a new layer into a client/server (C/S) architecture, the Web server, which acts as the gateway to the application logic and data. It is three‐tier…

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1282

Abstract

An intranet puts a new layer into a client/server (C/S) architecture, the Web server, which acts as the gateway to the application logic and data. It is three‐tier computing, where these functions are performed on separate servers. The servers store everything and perform the bulk of the querying and the data presentation. Although there is great potential using an intranet to develop applications, there are certain challenges, including: security, privacy, currency, and performance. There is progress with security but performance with high volume transaction processing is still unproved. There have been a lot of mistakes with C/S and the danger here is to go down the same road with the intranet. To avoid this, this study explores the managerial and technical issues involved in developing a corporate intranet. Inspired with the success of Internet, intranet is proved to be an extension of and an enhancement to C/S. Client/server is not dead just as the mainframe is not dead; but the C/S model is being changed by the intranet.

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Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Mary Ross and Dan Marmion

In an article published in the May 1997 issue of College and Research Libraries Merri Beth Lavagnino traced the history of the systems librarian and systems department in…

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1480

Abstract

In an article published in the May 1997 issue of College and Research Libraries Merri Beth Lavagnino traced the history of the systems librarian and systems department in academic libraries. She identified four evolutionary stages, where Stage One was no automation and Stage Four was characterized by the effects of networking and distributed computing. Lavagnino ended her article by predicting the emergence of a fifth stage. However, she pointed out it was too early to describe that stage. This paper examines the growth of automation at two university libraries, with particular attention to the four stages described by Lavagnino. The authors then attempt to provide a more complete description of Stage Five. It seems to be an outgrowth of the distributed computing and networking components of Stage Four. New factors include a growth in digitized resources, integration of systems, and developments in client/server technology, especially as they relate to the World Wide Web. Finally, Stage Five libraries seem to have made changes in the organizational structure, reflecting a need for a technical person at the upper management level.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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