Search results

1 – 10 of over 122000
Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

Diane E. Davis

In addition to their desire to address the gaps in my own essay, one possible explanation rests in a deeper and more nuanced appreciation of the role of ideology in middle…

Abstract

In addition to their desire to address the gaps in my own essay, one possible explanation rests in a deeper and more nuanced appreciation of the role of ideology in middle-class identity formation, an issue that I ignored almost completely. The importance of understanding the ideological underpinnings of “middle-classness” is a point directly taken up by several of the commentators, but it is best articulated and most convincingly argued by Raka Ray in her nuanced historical examination of the national political projects that sustained the idea of a middle class as moral vanguard and repository of universal values and aspirations. She shows how the “ideological work that middle-class identity performs” sustains unity among disparate middle-class forces, at times achieving such cultural resonance that it will engage even non-middle classes in a common political project. That is, Ray argues that the idea of the middle class as a social category has become so culturally appealing and ideologically hegemonic in modern India that it has even enabled political unity behind the class projects of the elite.

Details

Political Power and Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-326-3

Abstract

Details

The Law and Economics of Class Actions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-951-5

Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

Raka Ray

Questions about the role and composition of the middle class have been examined and debated in the academy and in the political sphere for more than 100 years. In analyses…

Abstract

Questions about the role and composition of the middle class have been examined and debated in the academy and in the political sphere for more than 100 years. In analyses of the Indian middle class specifically, two questions, both addressed by Diane Davis, seem to excite the most attention. The first has to do with the definition of a middle class, a term that has its origins in a very different social formation as well as its potentially mediating function in democracy. The second and more recent question has to do with what is variously called the “new” or “emerging” middle classes – in short, the middle classes of a liberalizing India.

Details

Political Power and Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-326-3

Abstract

Details

Left-Wing Populism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-203-9

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Sameeullah Khan, Asif Iqbal Fazili and Irfan Bashir

This study aims to examine whether counterfeit luxury buyers’ tendency to impress others overrides their anticipation of embarrassment or whether the anticipation of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether counterfeit luxury buyers’ tendency to impress others overrides their anticipation of embarrassment or whether the anticipation of embarrassment delimits their self-presentational goals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on three studies – a survey and two experiments that test the predictions. This study adopts a mix of moderation and mediation analyses to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal a greater counterfeit purchase likelihood and embarrassment aversion among publicly (vs privately) self-conscious consumers. Furthermore, a higher (vs a lower) audience class and a conspicuous (vs an inconspicuous) brand lead to lower counterfeit purchase intention, and anticipated embarrassment mediates both these effects. To mitigate the threat of embarrassment, publicly self-conscious consumers are more likely to buy counterfeits among a higher-class audience when the brand is inconspicuous (vs conspicuous). They, however, are indifferent to brand conspicuousness among a lower-class audience.

Practical implications

To deter counterfeit consumption, anti-counterfeiting campaigns must invoke consumers’ tendency to overestimate the degree of public attention. Ad appeals must accentuate the anticipation of embarrassment by enhancing self-consciousness through a higher-class audience involving a conspicuous brand.

Originality/value

This paper makes a novel contribution to counterfeiting literature by demonstrating that counterfeit luxury consumption is driven by countervailing motives of gaining approval and avoiding disapproval. The paper departs from mainstream theorizing by demonstrating that counterfeit luxury buyers engage in a protective self-presentation style by choosing inconspicuous counterfeits.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2022

Manjuma Akhtar Mousumi

The study explores government primary school students' remote learning experience during school closures due to COVID-19.

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores government primary school students' remote learning experience during school closures due to COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach and semi-structured interviews were employed for data collection. The study used a snowball sampling procedure to select 24 participants.

Findings

This study shows that students experienced setbacks in learning due to not having access to resources. Besides, online classes were expensive as they were not able to buy devices, internet package and other resources to participate in the remote classes. Since many students were unable to access digital media and get parental and teacher support for education, students' engagement in learning was very low. Moreover, the paucity of learning due to school closures has lowered students' motivation for learning. The study also contributed to understanding children's emotional attachment with the schools and how the closure affected their well-being. The results indicate that the students, teachers and parents did not have a positive experience with remote teaching–learning and the modalities did not contribute to continuing with meaningful learning.

Originality/value

The remote learning experience shared in this study can be used to inform policymakers, educators and stakeholders exploring remote learning solutions in low-resource contexts. This study contributes to understanding the skills and competencies teachers require to support children's learning during any crisis.

Details

Journal of International Cooperation in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2755-029X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Dustin K. Grabsch, Alexander Jennings-Rentz, Robert M. Kunovich, Sakshi Hinduja and Dedeepya Chinnam

This research study set out to answer the following question: How does social class relate to social connectedness in college?

Abstract

Purpose

This research study set out to answer the following question: How does social class relate to social connectedness in college?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors operationalized a nonexperimental, cross-sectional and analytical study design to analyze 271 survey responses.

Findings

This study illustrates that discretionary income has the most dramatic practical significance on the social connectedness of undergraduate students at the research site. As the body of knowledge regarding effective measures of social class for collegians increases, institutions should consider more innovative measures like discretionary spending, perceived social class and others during this unique transitional period of life.

Originality/value

A widened perspective of social class in college could aid in supporting the university and college goals of student success and social well-being.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2022

Noriyuki Inoue and Daniel Light

What does it take to successfully implement new educational innovation in schools, and what roles does lesson study play there? In order to answer this question, this…

Abstract

Purpose

What does it take to successfully implement new educational innovation in schools, and what roles does lesson study play there? In order to answer this question, this study investigated the implementation of Sesame Street's Dream–Save–Do (DSD) curriculum that was designed to help children in a Japanese elementary school learn to pursue their own dreams.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first reviewed available documents on the DSD curriculum in the district, and then conducted DSD class observations. The authors also interviewed the students, teachers, the principal, the lead teacher at the school, the school district staff in charge of the operation as well as the Sesame Japan staff in order to collect the data for the study.

Findings

The study found that students were highly engaged in open-ended discussions about their future dreams and how to achieve them in observed DSD classes. The implementation of the new curriculum benefited from utilizing lesson study as the main arena for curricular innovation. A further analysis of the data suggests that the success of the curricular innovation owed much to an inside-out implementation process that situated the iterative lesson study cycle of the teachers as the key driver of change while external actors supported the lesson study process in an inside-out fashion.

Research limitations/implications

The study implies that guiding an educational innovation to success requires not only institutionalized lesson study, but also cross-institutional collaborative dialogues to support the lesson study process with mutually established trust among key players of the innovation. Further studies are needed to investigate how this model sustains as principals and how this model works (or do not work) in other pilot schools and beyond.

Practical implications

This study implies that what matters most is that the school embodies a vision shared among teachers, school leaders and external curriculum developers, all working together across institutions in a spirit of collaboration. This type of inside-out implementation would be a path to ensure and sustain the success for those who plan any new educational innovation.

Social implications

What matters most was found to be that the school embodies a vision shared among educators, school leaders and external curriculum developers working together across institutions in a spirit of collaboration.

Originality/value

Guiding an educational innovation to success requires not only new ideas and effective curriculum plans but also a social structure that allows teachers to engage in effective implementations of the desired curriculum. Lesson study is often considered to be a within-school or school-to-school collaborative process. It is rarely connected to outside agents that bring in new ideas for educational innovation. This study found how inside- and outside-school actors can work together to actualize educational innovation, and what roles lesson study play there.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Md. Khaled Saifullah, Nuzhat Sharmeen and Zaima Ahmed

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) remains a global public health emergency as declared by the World Health Organization (WHO). The COVID-19 impacted educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) remains a global public health emergency as declared by the World Health Organization (WHO). The COVID-19 impacted educational institutions around the world, and they were shut down to minimize the fatalities and spread of the infection. Educational institutions around the world, including Bangladesh, started to conduct online classes as an alternative to physical classes. Therefore, this study assesses the effectiveness of online classes in terms of information and communications technology (ICT) readiness, online class assessment, online class participation, and convenience and flexibility for the educational institutions of Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

To fulfill the objective of the study, data were collected from 817 teachers and students. Additionally, the partial least squares (PLS) regression method was adopted as a quantitative technique.

Findings

The study shows that online class participation, online class assessment, and convenience and flexibility have positive relationships with ICT readiness and the effectiveness of online classes. At the same time, the challenges of online classes have negative relationships with ICT readiness and the effectiveness of online classes.

Practical implications

The study suggests that the government should ensure stable internet connectivity access across the country so that both students and teachers can participate in online classes effectively. Moreover, educational institutional authorities should extend support to the institutions for developing proper ICT infrastructure.

Originality/value

ICT infrastructure readiness is the backbone for effective online education; however, before the COVID-19 pandemic, online education was almost non-existent at the educational institutional level in Bangladesh. The country started developing the ICT infrastructure only when online classes were scheduled to start, and the development is still ongoing. Hence, this study used ICT readiness as a mediator factor. Moreover, primary data are used in this study. The findings of the study will help academicians and policymakers to better understand the effectiveness of online classes.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Ghazi Ghaith and Hassan Diab

The purpose of this paper is to determine the degree of interrelatedness and the role of a number of context‐specific factors in the English language proficiency…

664

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the degree of interrelatedness and the role of a number of context‐specific factors in the English language proficiency development of Arab college‐bound learners. These factors include: language class risk‐taking, sociability, discomfort, motivation, and attitude toward class.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a one‐group pretest‐posttest experimental design. In total, 67 (n=67) male English as a foreign language college‐bound learners participated in the study. All participants took general English language proficiency pretests and posttests in order to determine the effect size of improvement in their language proficiency after an intensive treatment of 200 contact hours. The calculated effect sizes of improvement were correlated with learners' scores on the factors under study as measured by a modified version of the Ely classroom climate measure. In addition, Pearson product‐moment correlation coefficients were computed and a step‐wise multiple regression analysis was run in order to determine the degree of interrelatedness among the variables under study and to determine their extent of their role in the effect size of the proficiency gains of the participants.

Findings

The findings indicated that language class sociability is positively related to students' motivation to learn and to a positive class attitude. Conversely, language class risk‐taking was found to be negatively related to class discomfort which in turn was negatively related to student motivation to learn. The findings also indicated that none of the affective variables under study predicted the effect size of the proficiency gains realized by learners.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study suggest that language acquisition is a complex process determined by interaction among a number of learner‐related and contextual factors. Furthermore, the findings suggest that motivation for learning is related to learners' affective feelings and may impact their class participation. A limitation of the study is that it employed a one‐group experimental design and, as such, there was no control or comparison group.

Practical implications

Using humanistic/affective methods of teaching could decrease students' feelings of class discomfort and increase their motivation and class sociability.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into the language acquisition process of Arab college‐bound learners based on empirical evidence.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 122000