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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Wendy C. Doucette and Rebecca L. Tolley

This chapter investigates ways in which civility and mindful speech within the library workplace can improve the quality of employees’ interactions with each other. While…

Abstract

This chapter investigates ways in which civility and mindful speech within the library workplace can improve the quality of employees’ interactions with each other. While most examinations of communication within libraries focus on the exchange between patrons and providers, this case study focuses on the vehicle of communication among co-workers and examines how civil discourse coupled with mindful speech reinforced by mindful actions can foster an atmosphere of cooperation, leading ultimately to empathy. We highlight common points within national and local civility initiatives which allow institutions to preserve their own unique culture while adhering to accepted benchmarks of civil dialogue. Although we present a mix of suggested strategies for cultivating mindful words and actions, based on empirical research limited to our own institution, we recommend civility and mindful speech leading to mindful action as gateways toward the adaptation of healthy shared values. Emphasizing civility, one of the cornerstones of civilization and peaceful coexistence, has widespread practical and social implications for countering the detrimental effects of poor communication. This effective, affordable, and attainable practice can repair the underdeveloped, fractured, and even dysfunctional relationships which lead to low workplace morale.

Details

Emotion in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-083-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2022

Achmadi Achmadi, Hendryadi Hendryadi, Amelia Oktrivina Siregar and Ambo Sakka Hadmar

This study aimed to examine the relationship between leader humility, civility climate and employee voice and uncover the moderating effect of competitive climate on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine the relationship between leader humility, civility climate and employee voice and uncover the moderating effect of competitive climate on the relationship between leader humility, civility climate and employee voice.

Design/methodology/approach

Three hundred seventy-nine respondents from various sectors in Indonesia participated in this study. All hypotheses were examined using hierarchical multiple regression analysis using the Hayes' macro PROCESS.

Findings

Leader humility positively and significantly impacts civility climate and employee voice. Competitive climate was confirmed as a moderator in the relationship between leader humility and civility climate and employee voice. The effect of team humility and civility climate on employee voice was strongest in a highly competitive climate.

Practical implications

By encouraging the adoption of leader humility, organizations can develop a civility climate and promote employee voice in the workplace. Leader humility is congruent with leadership practices in Asian countries, which are more strongly influenced by the virtues of certain religions. Leaders should demonstrate humble behaviors to generate a civility climate and employee voice. Authoritarian leadership and the high power distance inherent in Asian countries pose a challenge to the prioritization of humble behavior.

Originality/value

This study adds to the extant literature by revealing that leader humility fosters a civility climate and civility climate has positive consequences on employee voice; it is the first study to examine these relationships. Drawing on the social exchange theory, new insights explain the psychological mechanism underlying the relationship between leader humility, civility climate and employee voice while proposing a competitive climate as the boundary condition.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2022

Genta Kulari, Luísa Ribeiro, Tito Laneiro, Katerine Osatuke and Inês Mouta

This paper aims to propose a model studying the relationship of authentic leadership (AL), structural empowerment (SE) and civility in the palliative care sector. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a model studying the relationship of authentic leadership (AL), structural empowerment (SE) and civility in the palliative care sector. This model proposes SE as a mediator between AL and civility.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 213 employees working in five major public palliative care hospitals in central Portugal. The study sample was predominantly female (80.3%) and the response rate was 42.6%. Variables were measured using the Authentic Leadership Inventory, Workplace Civility Scale and Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire II scales. Hayes’ PROCESS macro for mediation analysis in SPSS was used to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

Results suggest that AL has a significant positive direct relationship with both SE and civility. Furthermore, SE demonstrated to play a partial mediation effect between AL and civility.

Practical implications

This study may be of use for healthcare administration encouraging the development of AL, suggesting that the more leaders are seen as authentic, the more employees will perceive they have access to workplace empowerment structures and a civil environment.

Originality/value

Considering the mainstream literature in healthcare management, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to date to integrate the relation of AL, SE and civility in the palliative care sector. Further, the research model has not previously been introduced when considering the mediating role structural empowerment can play between AL and civility.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Olga L. Clark and Benjamin M. Walsh

Research has consistently shown that organizational constraints lead to deviant behavioral reactions. Although many studies have investigated personality variables as…

1201

Abstract

Purpose

Research has consistently shown that organizational constraints lead to deviant behavioral reactions. Although many studies have investigated personality variables as moderators of such predictors of deviance, considerably less research has considered cross-level moderators of these effects. The purpose of this paper is to draw on several related theories to test team civility climate as a cross-level moderator of the organizational constraints – interpersonal deviance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using paper-and-pencil surveys from 239 employees nested within 68 work teams. Teams were employed in various industries including healthcare, insurance, manufacturing/engineering, and financial services.

Findings

Results from hierarchical linear modeling analyses demonstrated that the effect of organizational constraints on interpersonal deviance varied significantly across teams. In addition, the positive relationship between organizational constraints and interpersonal deviance was attenuated in teams with a high civility climate.

Practical implications

Organizational constraints may be difficult to eliminate in many workplaces. However, results suggest that by developing a positive civility climate, teams can help prevent deviant behaviors that may be associated with experienced constraints.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to examine civility climate as a shared property of the team and as a cross-level moderator. Findings from this research contribute to theories of deviant organizational behavior by highlighting the critical role of variables emanating from levels of analysis beyond the individual.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Anuj Gupta and Pankaj Singh

The antecedents and consequences of work engagement have been extensively discussed and analyzed in the previous literature; however, identifying cost-effective measures…

Abstract

Purpose

The antecedents and consequences of work engagement have been extensively discussed and analyzed in the previous literature; however, identifying cost-effective measures that can sustain work engagement to boost work outcomes has received sparse attention in the Indian information technology (IT) context. This study aims to provide new insights concerning the associations of job crafting and workplace civility with work engagement and its corresponding outcomes, such as change perception, general life satisfaction and intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling on data obtained from 369 software developers in India using questionnaire surveys.

Findings

Results confirmed that work engagement partially mediated the association of job crafting and workplace civility with the perception of change and general life satisfaction. The negative associations of job crafting and workplace civility with the intention to quit were also partially mediated by work engagement. The findings can be used to inform human resources strategies to boost work engagement and subsequent work outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this empirical work will offer insights to managers who are looking for cost-effective interventions and behaviors aimed at increasing work engagement and, consequently, achieving effective work outcomes.

Originality/value

This study contributes by empirically testing the application of novel employee-driven practices in improving work engagement and work outcomes, particularly in the context of IT companies in India.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Peter Johnson

Working on the assumption that civility is the core value of R.G. Collingwood's political philosophy, the paper aims to examine the capacity of civility to curb economic…

608

Abstract

Purpose

Working on the assumption that civility is the core value of R.G. Collingwood's political philosophy, the paper aims to examine the capacity of civility to curb economic excess in the absence of distributive justice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates the economic and political writings of Collingwood to see if they can be made to yield restraints on economic excess when based on civility alone. Comparisons are drawn between Collingwood and modern liberal philosophers such as John Rawls in order to identify where Collingwood stands on key concepts in the argument. Contrasts are established with Hobbes and Ruskin on the issues at stake, so clarifying what can be drawn from Collingwood on the specific topic under discussion.

Findings

The paper concludes that there is theoretical scope within Collingwood's political writings for a curb on economic excess in the absence of a concept of distributive justice, even though this takes a different form from the approach of modern liberals such as John Rawls.

Originality/value

It is shown that Collingwood's economic writings are relevant to modern discussions of social justice even when it is civility and not justice that is Collingwood's main focus.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2016

Leah P. Hollis

The simultaneous proliferation of developmental education and online computer-based education creates questions about the success and failure of students engaging in…

Abstract

The simultaneous proliferation of developmental education and online computer-based education creates questions about the success and failure of students engaging in remediation without teacher-led instruction. While many studies show minimal difference in student performance between online and face-to-face instruction (Schenker, 2007; Utts et al., 2003; Ward, 2004; Zieffler et al., 2008), other researchers (Bahr, 2012; Bailey, 2009; Crisp & Delgado, 2014) examine the effectiveness of developmental education to assist students in math, English, or both. In addition, Astin’s student development theory (1999) confirms that positive faculty-student interaction helps students persist through the curriculum. Faculty can create those supportive environments that help students. Therefore, within the cross-section of developmental education and computer-based instruction, the purpose of this study is to consider the importance of teacher care and civility for black and Hispanic developmental English students in an open-access, minority-serving institution. The findings show that while a statistically significant relationship was not observed, there is a positive relationship between students’ perception that the professor is caring and civil and the final grade.

Details

The Coercive Community College: Bullying and its Costly Impact on the Mission to Serve Underrepresented Populations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-597-3

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

R. Michael Bokeno

The purpose of this paper is to expose some underlying implications of the term “civility” as a developmental issue for preferred behavior in organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expose some underlying implications of the term “civility” as a developmental issue for preferred behavior in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The terms “civility” and “community” are contrasted with the intent of determining what behaviors we really want at work.

Findings

Civility invokes rules and behavioral codes that might preclude community.

Practical implications

Civility” and “community” require distinct sets of interaction behavior and understanding.

Social implications

Reflection on what we really want in our interaction with others at work should drive organizational policies regarding preferred organizational behavior.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Olga L. Sharp, Yisheng Peng and Steve M. Jex

The purpose of this paper is to expand the research on workplace mistreatment and its effects on individual employees while taking into account the organizational setting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the research on workplace mistreatment and its effects on individual employees while taking into account the organizational setting. This cross-level study explores the interaction between the team Civility climate (CC) and individual experience of exclusion and their combined effect on the target’s organization-based self-esteem (OBSE).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 251 individuals nested in 71 teams (mean team size=4.6) completed surveys. A two-way multi-level interaction model was used to test the moderation hypothesis.

Findings

The cross-level interaction between CC and exclusion was significant, which means that CC influenced the strength of the relationship between exclusion and OBSE. Specifically, it was found that the higher the group-level civility norms, the stronger the negative relationship between exclusion and OBSE.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is its cross-sectional design. All variables were self-reported and collected at one time-point.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to workplace mistreatment literature by using a multi-level design to examine exclusion as a predictor of OBSE and team CC as a cross-level moderator of this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Leslie Armour

The globalisation of the world economy has left governments less powerful and threatened cultures with homogenisation. The Huntington thesis – that the world is now…

2018

Abstract

The globalisation of the world economy has left governments less powerful and threatened cultures with homogenisation. The Huntington thesis – that the world is now divided into rival civilisations and that they are likely to be the source of the next round of world conflicts – may seem weak in the light of this. In fact many people fear that economic efficiency will produce a single culture and, because it will be dominated by hotly competing corporations with little restraint, will threaten civility itself. R.G. Collingwood even argued that economics as a practical science threatens civilisation by its very existence. This paper argues that, if one takes seriously Collingwood’s own distinction between wealth and riches, and if a co‐operative economy can be made to flourish, civilisation can readily survive. Wealth in these terms is a community resource which frees up human possibilities, riches are personal barricades and a source of power, and we can understand how to maximise wealth without creating unnecessary riches. In these terms the three main competing civilisations – that of the West, that of Islam, and the Chinese civilisation which is exemplified, for instance in Taiwan, may well survive and remain distinct. They represent basic human choices. For one can have societies in which the major focus is on individuals, societies in which it is on the community as a whole, and societies in which it is on families, social groups, churches and other institutions which comprise civil society.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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