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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Philip Mendes, Rachel Standfield, Bernadette Saunders, Samone McCurdy, Jacinta Walsh and Lena Turnbull

This paper aims to report on the findings of a qualitative study that explored the views of 53 service providers assisting Indigenous young people (known in Australia as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the findings of a qualitative study that explored the views of 53 service providers assisting Indigenous young people (known in Australia as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth) transitioning from out-of-home care (OOHC) in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups with 53 representatives of state and territory government departments, non-government organisation service providers and Aboriginal community-controlled organisations (ACCOs) across Australia. The project was designed to gain the perspectives of those working within the system and their views on how it interacts with Indigenous care leavers. Interview questions aimed to ascertain the strengths and weaknesses of the leaving care support systems available to this cohort, as well as the key challenges facing service providers in supporting them. Finally, the study aimed to make recommendations for policy development in this area and identify potential best practice service responses.

Findings

The study found that the OOHC service systems continue to fail Indigenous care leavers, their families and communities. Study findings revealed that Indigenous care-leavers face substantial challenges and that the support systems for those leaving OOHC are often culturally insensitive and ineffective. Many Indigenous OOHC leavers lacked the supports they needed to develop safe and ongoing relationships with their traditional Country, family and communities. To promote more positive transitions and outcomes, effective practice responses were identified, including culturally safe programmes and proportional funding for ACCOs to advance greater self-determination.

Originality/value

This research is the first national study in Australia to examine the specific transition from care pathways and experiences of Indigenous young people. The findings add to the limited existing knowledge on Indigenous care leavers globally and should inform practice and policy innovations with this cohort in Australia and beyond.

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2019

Cathy Atkinson and Rebekah Hyde

Considerable attention has been given to the vulnerability of young people leaving care in the UK in their transition to adulthood. To date, however, there has been…

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Abstract

Purpose

Considerable attention has been given to the vulnerability of young people leaving care in the UK in their transition to adulthood. To date, however, there has been limited focus on the perceptions of care leavers about what factors enable and inhibit effective practice. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This systematic literature review sought to elicit the views of UK care leavers in identifying barriers and facilitators to the process of transition to adulthood. Qualitative studies in the care-leaving field were identified, of which seven met inclusion criteria and were included in the final synthesis.

Findings

The findings yielded a range of facilitators, including authentic and consistent relationships with those acting in the role of corporate parent; and flexible systems, which accommodated personal readiness for leaving care. Barriers included insufficient recognition of, and a lack of support for, the psychological dimensions of transition, exacerbated by insufficient support networks.

Research limitations/implications

This literature search yielded seven qualitative papers, some with small sample sizes, meaning that the findings may not be representative of a wider population or directly relevant to international contexts.

Practical implications

Suggestions for enhancing the transition process are posited. In particular, the potential usefulness of an “interdependence” transition approach for UK care leavers is proposed.

Originality/value

This study analyses qualitative data, thus constituting a response to policy calls for care leaver views to be central to transition processes.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Jon Dow

This article takes a fresh look at the duties to care leavers, focusing on the overlap with adult services in relation to young care leavers over the age of 18.

Abstract

This article takes a fresh look at the duties to care leavers, focusing on the overlap with adult services in relation to young care leavers over the age of 18.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2022

Adrian D. Van Breda, Anduamlak Molla Takele and Messay Gebremariam Kotecho

Research on caregivers’ experiences of and perspectives on preparing young people to leave care in Africa is lacking. A clearer understanding of caregivers’ practice and…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on caregivers’ experiences of and perspectives on preparing young people to leave care in Africa is lacking. A clearer understanding of caregivers’ practice and experience is important for developing improved care-leaving services. The aim of this study is to describe the experiences and perceptions of caregivers providing care-leaving services at one residential care institution in Addis Abba, Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative description research design was used to examine the perspectives of seven caregivers and three key informants concerning the preparation of female care-leavers for leaving care and their readiness to lead an adult life in Ethiopia. Participants were purposively selected and data were collected through focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. The generated data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Caregivers are passionate about their work, seeing it more as a calling than as a job, and think of themselves as parents to the children. Most reported receiving at least some training, albeit informal or ad hoc, and faced challenges because of lack of resources. Regarding their preparation of the girls for leaving care, caregivers reported inadequate success in financial literacy and savings, continued schooling, cooking, cultural literacy and aftercare support.

Originality/value

This study thus underscores the absence of a preparation for leaving care practice guideline and an independent policy that guides care-leaving in Ethiopia. Policy improvement on caregiving that recognises and values the complexity of the job of caregiving, and thus the need for greater education, is highly needed. This paper sheds light on the issue of supporting caregivers’ attempt to mentor female care-leavers in Ethiopia.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2010

Roger Morgan

This article sets out the views and experience of children and young people on selected major aspects of their lives which are governed by provisions in the Children Act…

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Abstract

This article sets out the views and experience of children and young people on selected major aspects of their lives which are governed by provisions in the Children Act 1989. It draws on extensive statutory consultations with children in care, receiving children's social care services, or otherwise living away from home, carried out over the past eight years by the Children's Rights Director for England. Two key themes from children are featured in particular: the extent to which the intentions of the Act are actually experienced by children in practice, and the extent to which delivery of the intentions of the Act is individualised according to each child's needs, wishes and feelings. Children's views, experiences and, in some cases, proposals for the future are explored in relation to ascertaining and taking into account children's wishes and concerns in decision‐making, selection of placements, support to care leavers, family contact, care planning and reviews, and complaints and representations. The issues of private fostering and the intentions and development of the role of the Independent Reviewing Officer are discussed from the child's perspective and in the light of the subsequent Children and Young Persons Act 2008.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Penelope Welbourne and Caroline Leeson

This paper seeks to explore three key aspects of the education of children in care: the composition of that population of children and the extent to which they differ from…

2272

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore three key aspects of the education of children in care: the composition of that population of children and the extent to which they differ from the general population of children due to difficulties most of them have experienced prior to as well as after entering care; issues relating to the identification of causal relationships and the extent of “underachievement” by children in care; and any evidence that care may provide more positive opportunities than is often supposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's approach is an extensive literature review of existing published research into social policy and practice of caring for looked after children.

Findings

The significant factors that contribute to better achievement for children in care are: placement stability and support at school but for some children therapeutic help and specialist assessments are necessary to improve outcomes. Different analyses produce different results and the scrutiny of children's trajectories indicates better outcomes than one‐off comparisons with children not in care.

Originality/value

Extensive research has established that children in care achieve less educationally than their peers not in care, but does not explain why. This paper helps to fill this gap.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2019

Stella McKnight, Sarah-Louise Collins, David Way and Pam Iannotti

The government’s ambition is to have three million more apprentices by 2020. The newness of degree apprenticeships and insufficient data make it difficult to assess their…

Abstract

Purpose

The government’s ambition is to have three million more apprentices by 2020. The newness of degree apprenticeships and insufficient data make it difficult to assess their relative importance in boosting the UK economy, meeting higher skills needs of employers, closing educational attainment gaps, increasing social mobility and supporting under-represented groups into professional employment. The purpose of this paper, led by the University of Winchester and delivered by a new collaboration of private and public sector partners, is to build a pipeline between those currently failing to progress to, or engage with, degree apprenticeships and employers seeking higher skills and a broader pool of applicants.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an analysis of collaborative initiatives and related research in England as the context for university involvement in degree apprenticeships. The case study illustrates the benefits of collaboration in targeted outreach initiatives within the local region to address gaps in progression to degree apprenticeships.

Findings

This paper illustrates how establishing a regional picture of degree apprenticeship provision, access and participation can inform effective partnerships and build capacity locally to deliver the higher skills employers need, further demonstrating the potential benefits of university involvement in degree apprenticeship provision in contributing to local and national policy ambition. It also shows how effective targeted interventions can help under-achieving groups, including those in social care and women in digital enterprises.

Originality/value

The authors believe this paper is the only academic analysis of the impact of Degree Apprenticeship Development Fund activity in the region.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

John Harding and Fil Stocker

The authors give a view from the Probation Service in Inner London about the potential impact of the Government's Supporting People proposals on the care of offenders in…

Abstract

The authors give a view from the Probation Service in Inner London about the potential impact of the Government's Supporting People proposals on the care of offenders in the community.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Article
Publication date: 18 March 2022

Philip Mullan

This paper aims to explore the outcomes experienced by young people leaving care in Ireland today through the theoretical lens of social capital.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the outcomes experienced by young people leaving care in Ireland today through the theoretical lens of social capital.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents selected qualitative data and its analysis that was gathered through a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews with three key informants (care leavers). In gathering interview data, the Biographic-Narrative Interpretive Method (BNIM) was selected, as it allowed the research participants a great deal of autonomy in recounting significant events from their own lives.

Findings

In drawing upon the lived experience of these care leavers, this work will discuss how their in-care and post-care experiences shaped their exposure to and development of sources of social capital, which in turn proved to be a significant factor in shaping their in-care and post-care outcomes.

Social implications

Care leavers remain systemically disadvantaged in comparison to young people who have not been in care. Research has shown that children in care and care leavers are often disadvantaged educationally and experience higher rates of homelessness, unemployment and social isolation. This paper discusses the role of “social capital”, i.e. relationships that provide access to social and material resources and opportunities, in shaping care leavers exposure to and experience of these disadvantages.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this work is the first in the Irish context to draw on the concept of social capital to explore its role in shaping the in-care and post-care experiences of care leavers in Ireland.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Berni Kelly, Colm Walsh, John Pinkerton and Alicia Toal

This paper aims to report on the findings of a qualitative study that explored the views and experiences of young people leaving care during the first phase of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the findings of a qualitative study that explored the views and experiences of young people leaving care during the first phase of the Covid-19 pandemic in Northern Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted involving semi-structured interviews with 24 care leavers 18–25 years old from across the region. Interviews were conducted remotely online or by telephone and explored young people’s lived experiences during the pandemic including their views on the formal support services and how best to provide ongoing for support care leavers during the pandemic.

Findings

Study findings highlight how known adversities for care leavers are exacerbated during the pandemic, having a detrimental impact, particularly on their emotional well-being. The response of the state as a corporate parent in mitigating the impact of the pandemic was found to be inadequate; with a need for much clearer communication, transparent and prompt decision-making and targeted specialist mental health services. The account given by the young people also highlighted the importance of participation and relationship-based practice to build on the young people’s resilience in the context of high levels of social isolation and limited access to informal support systems.

Originality/value

This research, based on the views of care experienced young people themselves, is the first study in Northern Ireland to report on the impact of the Covid 19 pandemic on care leaving. As such it makes a contribution to this emerging international field of study and, given the persistence of the pandemic, provides empirical findings and a social justice perspective of ongoing relevance to policy and practice with young people leaving care.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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